Yotel to move into Australia with Melbourne property

first_imgOlderWTTC partners with World Economic Forum for seamless travel initiatives Yotel has announced its first hotel in Australia.Yotel Melbourne is slated to open in 2022 and has been signed under a management agreement with Cornerstone Partners Group. Cornerstone is an integrated hospitality asset owner and developer with offices in Malaysia, Taiwan and Australia.The 244-room property will be located on 63-69 City Road in Southbank – within walking distance of Melbourne’s central business district, the Arts Precinct, Federation Square and the Melbourne Cricket Ground.Yotel Melbourne will be a flagship property for Yotel in Australia, featuring the brand’s latest generation of cabins (Yotel speak for rooms). “Over the past two years, we have been actively searching for the right locations and partners to roll out our brands in Australia, a key market for our global expansion and a key feeder market for our hotels in the US, Singapore and the UK. ADVERTISEMENT“With solid market fundamentals and global appeal, Melbourne is the perfect gateway to launch our first property in the country.“Moreover, we are delighted to enter the market with Cornerstone Partners Group, an international leader in hospitality and real estate investments,” said Hubert Viriot, chief executive of Yotel.The property will also feature a 24/7 gym and viewing deck with restaurant and bar.“Our group is focused on finding gaps in the hospitality markets across Asia Pacific.“In Australia, we believe there is an avenue for disruptive brands such as Yotel, which offer something completely new to the market. “We were also impressed by Yotel’s global development pipeline, focused on key gateway markets, which fits perfectly with our strategy, therefore it was only natural to join forces on our first project in Australia in Melbourne, one of the country’s most cosmopolitan and urbanised cities,” said Jason Chong, chief executive, Cornerstone Partners Group. NewerDP World raises capital for further expansionlast_img read more

Addition of CTLA4 targeted therapy to PD1 targeted therapy may benefit patients

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 19 2018An analysis of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-GY003 suggests that adding ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets the protein receptor CTLA-4, to a regimen with the checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab could improve the proportion with tumor response and progression-free survival hazard rates for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. These results were presented as a late-breaking abstract oral presentation at the 17th Biennial Meeting of the International Gynecological Cancer Society (IGCS) in Kyoto, Japan. This trial was sponsored by the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the agents were provided to NCI by Bristol Myers Squibb under the cooperative research and development agreements between Bristol Myers Squibb and NCI for the development of nivolumab and ipilimumab.NRG-GY003 assessed the difference in tumor response proportions in 100 women between two treatment regimens over a period of six months. Participants on this trial were randomly assigned to either the first treatment arm (TA1) which received nivolumab alone, or the second arm (TA2) which received a combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab followed by maintenance nivolumab. Tumor response proportions were evaluated through RECIST 1.1 and secondary analyses included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and adverse events (AEs).Related StoriesTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerWithin six months from randomization, 6 (12.2%) responses occurred in TA1 and 16 (31.4%) responses occurred in TA2 (the odds ratio is 3.28 with 85% confidence that it is greater than 1.90). Following the six-month evaluation period, one additional response appeared on TA2. The platinum-free interval stratified hazard ratio (HR) for progression-free survival was 0.528 (95% CI 0.339 to 0.821) and the respective HR for death was 0.789 (95% CI 0.439-1.418). Adverse events (grade 3 or higher) were more prevalent in TA2, however, there were no new safety signals and no treatment-related deaths.”From my perspective, this is the first evidence that the addition of CTLA4 targeted therapy to PD-1 targeted therapy in patients with ovarian cancer may be more beneficial than PD-1 targeted therapy alone. Future directions could include a trial combining nivolumab and ipilimumab in front line therapy as an adjunct to standard chemotherapy,” stated Robert A. Burger, MD, the abstract Lead Author and Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.The trial was not powered to detect a difference in overall survival, and there was no preliminary evidence to indicate a detrimental effect from TA2.Source: https://www.nrgoncology.org/last_img read more