Colleges discuss distribution of students

first_imgWith the March 4 deadline to declare a specific college approaching, students wandered up and down aisles of tables at Majors Night in South Dining Hall on Jan. 27. Along the way, they paused to inquire about specific majors in the five colleges that make up the University. Sam Gaglio, assistant dean of the Mendoza College of Business, said he was pleased by how students continued to explore academic opportunities. “Most didn’t have a predetermined track. That was what really demonstrated to me the opportunities of a Notre Dame education,” Gaglio said. Hugh Page, dean of the First Year of Studies, said enrollment numbers for each college are variables. “The first year at Notre Dame is a time of discernment and contemplative exploration,” Page said. “Enrollment numbers speak to the intellectual curiosity of our students and the unfolding of their journeys as they respond to the call of wisdom’s voice.” Page said he anticipates the College of Arts and Letters to enroll the most freshmen, followed closely by the Mendoza College of Business and the College of Science. Page said 28 percent of freshmen plan to enter the College of Arts and Letters, 26 percent the Mendoza College of Business, 18 percent the College of Engineering, 25 percent the College of Science and two percent the School of Architecture.Currently, Arts and Letters consists of 2,500 undergraduates. Mendoza has 1,780; Science 1,189; Engineering 950; and Architecture 250. Page said enrollment in engineering, science and business majors has increased, while the School of Architecture has seen consistent demand. Page said there is a deepening student interest in educational synergies involving coursework between other colleges and the College of Arts and Letters. “Contemporary issues such as sustainability, energy policy, global health, technology and values, ethics and business, peace studies and poverty studies require broad disciplinary exposure,” said Page. “That places students and faculty from all of these Colleges at what might be termed a ‘nexus of creativity,’ where the ideas and innovations that will shape the future are imagined.” Gaglio said students deciding which college to enter should consider their passions and what they wish to gain from their experiences. “To say one program will give you an advantage over another is an incorrect statement. What are you passionate about? Be excited, engaged and throw yourself into it,” he said. “Each is equally impressive and creates an advantage in your next endeavor.” John McGreevy, dean of the College of Arts and Letters, said a college should open significant intellectual and moral questions to students. “College is the perfect time to study and debate these great issues,” he said. “The ability to write, the ability to analyze data, and the ability to speak is of greatest use for any student after leaving Notre Dame.” For freshmen still deciding, Holly Martin, assistant dean of the First Year of Studies, said it is important to remember choosing a college or major is not the same as choosing a career. “The Career Center is happy to work with first-year students about possible career choices,” she said. “But it isn’t necessary to know what you would like to do as a future career when choosing your college or major.” Page said students change their minds often as coursework, conversations and intellectual exploration generate moments that lead to reevaluation. “A decision at or near the end of the first year at Notre Dame need not be seen as irreversible,” he said. It is crucial for students to follow their passions, Gaglio said. “You don’t ‘have’ to do anything except believe in what you study to be a success. The point is, the university education is your grounding, and then you specialize after that,” he said. “Continue your education. We learn our entire lives.”last_img read more

Deer Control

first_imgHome gardeners love adding plants to their landscapes. Deer love eating them. “When it comes to wildlife damage in landscapes and agricultural plantings, the most common problem is deer feeding and browsing damage — especially in the winter and early spring,” said Paul Pugliese, a University of Georgia Extension agent in Bartow County. A hungry deer in the winter will eat just about any vegetation and can easily consume four pounds or more of plant material each day, he said.Plant prickly plantsTo help keep Bambi and his buddies from destroying landscape plants, UGA Extension home vegetable horticulturist Bob Westerfield suggests planting varieties that are harder to swallow, literally.“Tougher plants like hollies and junipers are usually less desirable to deer,” he said. “I’m not saying they won’t eat them, but the prickly leaves make it more difficult.” Westerfield says plants like hostas, pansies and fleshy succulents are “like ice cream” to deer.(A publication with a complete list of deer tolerant ornamental plants can be found on the UGA Extension publication website at www.caes.uga.edu/publications.)Change odor repellents frequentlyOdor repellents can also be used to keep deer at bay, but Pugliese and Westerfield both view them as temporary fixes.“Odor repellents are not very effective because they wear off when it rains,” Pugliese said. “If used, they should be applied at least once a month, or after every rainfall, from early fall until late winter. If you miss a timely application, the end result will be deer damage.”If food is extremely scarce, he has seen deer ignore the repellents despite the taste or odor. “Deer don’t develop resistance to repellents, but they do get use to them,” he said.Preventatives like garlic sticks and sprays will work longer if rotated, Westerfield added. On his farm in Pike County, he hung garlic sticks in his pear tree to keep deer from eating all the fruit. “What I discovered is the deer must like garlic-flavored pears,” he said.Mesh or electric fencesPersonally, Westerfield recommends building a fence to block deer from vegetable gardens. Home garden centers sell what Westerfield calls “a thin version” of deer fencing. He orders 7 ft. tall heavy gauge deer fencing online.Deer recently chewed a hole through this. “The next level for our farm will be an electric fence. Electricity will be the first welcome to our garden from now on,” said a clearly frustrated Westerfield. Todd Hurt, training coordinator for the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture, was so frustrated by deer destroying his landscape that he bought a Scarecrow Sprinkler. The device’s manufacturer claims a blast of water from the motion activated sprinkler will “scare animals away, teaching them to avoid the area in the future.” “It seemed to work. It got me every time I would forget about it,” Hurt said. “It needs a constant supply of water pressure so I had to connect it to PVC pipe instead of a water hose because the hose will swell or burst. And, it was pretty strong and would move on the stake so the stake needs extra support.”For more information on deer control in home landscapes, contact your local UGA Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

Taxed and tested

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PM Skerrit suggests a competition to name the Windsor Park Stadium

first_img Share 11 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! Share LocalNews PM Skerrit suggests a competition to name the Windsor Park Stadium by: – July 12, 2011center_img Tweet Share Hon. Prime Minister Roosevelt SkerritPrime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit says a name for the National Stadium should become a matter for national debate.The national stadium which hosted its first test match last week in the 3rd Digicel Series, West Indies vs. India however there has been no official name for the facility.“I believe we should look at it, I believe there should be public competition and suggesstion for it. The Windsor Park Stadium, the National Stadium is confusing people. I have heard the debate from the commentators on it so I think we should really look at changing the name so that there will be a consistent name, a name that everyone would embrace. I think it should be a public request, let the public suggest and the committee would look at it and there will be a voting on it…” he said.Prime Minister Skerrit suggests that the official name should be done competition style.Dominica Vibes Newslast_img read more