Dave Schools Subs For Phil Lesh In Guest-Filled Terrapin Crossroads Celebration [Video]

first_imgIn continuation of their 5th anniversary celebration, Terrapin Crossroads hosted Scott Law & Ross James’ Cosmic Twang for the Wednesday night show. Unfortunately venue founder and Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh fell sick with a cold, but recruited Widespread Panic’s Dave Schools to fill in on bass for the entire show.Scott Law & Ross James’ Cosmic Twang were also joined by keyboardist Jason Crosby, vocalist Nicki Bluhm, Cass McCombs, Barry Sless, and drummers Mark Levy and Alex Koford throughout the evening. Thanks to YouTube User MarkoVision Films, you can watch both guest-filled sets below. Setlist: Scott Law & Ross James’ Cosmic Twang | Terrapin Crossroads | San Rafael, CA | 3/8/17:Set I: Sittin’ on Top of the World (SL), Luxury Liner (NB), West L.A. Fadeaway (RJ, NB, AK), Million Dollar Bash (CM), Across the Great Divide (CM, NB), I Don’t Know You (SL, NB), Big Railroad Blues (RJ), Light Up or Leave Me Alone (AK) > New Speedway Boogie (AK) > The Other One (SL) > New Speedway Boogie (AK) > Light Up or Leave Me Alone (One Way or Another) > Light Up or Leave Me Alone (AK)Set II: China Cat Sunflower > (SL, CM) Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds > (CM) Help on the Way > (SL) Slipknot! > Franklin’s Tower (SL, JC, RJ, CM, NB), Get It While You Can (SL, NB), The Stranger (Two Souls in Communion) (CM), Grievous Angel (SL, NB)E: Sin City (SL, NB)[via JamBase][cover photo via Instagram User @stuartlevinephotography]last_img read more

Vermont hospitals show low infection rate in national report

first_imgThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) has released its “First State-Specific Healthcare-Associated Infections Summary Data Report”, which gives an overview of where the country stands in efforts to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). The report is based on both national and state-specific CLABSI data collected by NHSN.The NHSN report looked at CLABSI data from January – June 2009. During that time, Vermont hospitals reported CLABSI rates that were among the lowest of the seventeen states that were included in the report, and that were significantly lower than the report’s standardized infection ratio baseline of 1.0. Vermont’s ratio for the period reported was 0.27.“This report is good news for Vermonters who depend on Vermont hospitals to provide quality health care services and treatment,” said Paulette J. Thabault, Commissioner of Banking, Insurance, Securities & Health Care Administration. “Vermont’s leadership in this area has been the result of extraordinary collaboration between consumer advocates, the Legislature, hospital infection preventionists, the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, the Vermont Program for Quality in Health Care, and state agencies.”Jill Olson, Vice President of Policy and Operations at the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, echoed Thabault’s sentiment about the dedication and effort responsible for the positive results reported by NHSN. “Vermont’s results are a credit to the physicians and nurses who take care of Vermonters every day, and to the dedicated hospital infection preventionists who help bring medical evidence into practice at the bedside.” “This is real health care reform: quality and safety improvements for patients. Vermont’s excellent performance demonstrates the importance of transparency and public reporting in spurring quality improvement. It’s a proud day for consumer advocates, hospitals and BISHCA here in Vermont,” said Jeanne Keller, who represents a small business association, Business Resource Services, on the Hospital Report Card Advisory Panel.Vermont was the third state in the country to publicly report hospital-specific CLABSI rates, beginning in 2007, as part of health care quality improvement efforts overseen by BISHCA. Vermont hospitals have participated in the NHSN system since 2006, and Vermont was the first state to utilize the system for public reporting. The CLABSI report is part of BISHCA’s annual Hospital Report Card, which can be found on the BISHCA website. A copy of the NHSN report is also available on BISHCA’s site.According to the CDC, an estimated 248,000 bloodstream infections occur in U.S. hospitals each year. It is believed that a large proportion of these are associated with the presence of a central line – a flexible tube inserted near the heart or into one of the large veins or arteries, and used to administer medication or fluids, obtain blood tests, and directly obtain cardiovascular measurements. Because of where central lines are located, they can cause potentially dangerous bloodstream infections. Bloodstream infections can cause longer hospital stays, increased costs and increased risk of mortality. CLABSI can be prevented through proper management of central lines.About BISHCAThe Vermont Department of Banking, Insurance, Securities & Health Care Administration touches most Vermonters in some fashion, through its regulation and monitoring of a broad spectrum of financial and health industry activities. Regulated entities/areas include, for example: banks, licensed lenders, credit unions, insurance companies and their products, agents, securities firms, broker/dealers and investment advisors, HMO’s and hospital finances.Source: BISHCA. 5.27.2010last_img read more

Institutional investors must get better grasp of dealing costs, says CEM

first_imgThe firm said its international study was one of the most detailed ever done on the subject and gave an indication of the overall size of these costs for the first time.John Simmonds, UK principal at CEM Benchmarking, said: “Transaction costs make up a significant part of the investment costs incurred by institutional asset owners.”Where individual asset owners sat in the range of transaction costs revealed in the study depended on asset mix, volumes of trades, estimates of spreads – or simply whether they were paying more or less than others for similar activities.“These criteria are all possible to monitor and manage as part of regular cost assessment, so institutional investors need to better understand these costs and the factors that drive them,” Simmonds said.He added that there had been a push for cost transparency around the world, but getting the data was the first and hardest part of this effort. “What comes next is a comparison with others on a sensible basis to determine if those costs are reasonable,” he said.Data from the regulator in the Netherlands – which places a particular emphasis on cost efficiency – showed that, in 2017, schemes spent an average 38.5bps on asset management costs. However, this ranged from 9bps to 162bps across the 231-fund sample.Similarly, transaction costs averaged 9bps, but ranged from 1bps to 40bps. Asset owners need to understand the material nature of transaction costs to their overall investment bills, according to a new study by CEM Benchmarking.In a report on the impact of transaction costs among large asset owners around the world, the data and analysis company found that transaction-related charges made up an average of 24% of the total cost of investing.Across its sample of 19 pension funds and sovereign wealth funds running more than €2.2trn, asset owners paid an average 86.3 basis points for investments, of which 20.2bps on average went to transaction costs.This was around the same level as performance fees and about half that of base manager fees or internal management costs, CEM Benchmarking said.last_img read more