Deputies Shut Down Last Illegal Pasadena Marijuana Dispensary

first_img Make a comment Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Public Safety Deputies Shut Down Last Illegal Pasadena Marijuana Dispensary Locks changed and Walnut Street property returned to property owner By ANDRÉ COLEMAN, Managing Editor Published on Friday, February 28, 2020 | 1:00 am First Heatwave Expected Next Week Subscribe 11 recommendedShareShareTweetSharePin it Top of the News Community News More Cool Stuff HerbeautyKate Beckinsale Was Shamed For Being “Too Old” To Wear A BikiniHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Bad To Give Your Boyfriend An Ultimatum?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Fashion Tips Are Making Tall Girls The Talk Of The TownHerbeautyHerbeauty Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.center_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Community News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News The final illegal cannabis dispensary in Pasadena was forced to close on Thursday morning.“This morning Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies evicted employees of the illegal cannabis dispensary known as Kush 20 House at 1644 E. Walnut Street and returned lawful occupancy to the property owner,” said Code Commissioner Jon Pollard. “A locksmith was on site to remove the ex-tenant’s locks and install new locks for the property owner.”The operators of Kush 20 House lost a court battle last week after a judge ruled against an ex parte motion that would have stopped the eviction.The city has fought to close illegal dispensaries for several years.“As of this morning Kush 20 House Dispensary is now closed,” said Lisa Derderian. “This was the last illegally operating dispensary that was still in operation. Over the last 17 months, the City’s Marijuana Suppression Detail has now successfully shut down all of the original 19 dispensaries along with 5 other dispensaries that opened up during the last 17 months. The Detail has also closed down a grow facility during that time period as well. There are now no illegally operating dispensaries in the City of Pasadena. This represents an incredibly successful collaboration of a number of City departments and an incredible result for 17 months of work. Code Compliance and The Pasadena Police Department should also be commended for their tireless work on this.”In a 2-1 decision in December, Pasadena’s Code Enforcement Commission formally ordered the closure of Kush 20 House.In 2018, voters passed Measure CC, the city’s highly regulated process which allows only six pot dispensaries — and only one in each of the city’s seven council districts — to operate legally in Pasadena.The measure also requires dispensaries to maintain strict distance limits from schools, libraries, churches and residential neighborhoods. Nearly 200 businesses applied to do business in Pasadena.In June, The Atrium Group, Harvest of Pasadena, Integral Associates Dena, Tony Fong, Sweetwater Pasadena and MME Pasadena Retail were picked from among 122 applicants vying for permission to sell marijuana in the city.So far only Harvey and Integral have received conditional use permits.After Measure CC passed, the City Council banned so-called “nuisance,” or non-permitted dispensaries from applying for business licenses under the city’s cannabis law.“City staff will remain watchful for the presence of any other illegal cannabis dispensaries that may attempt to establish a presence in the city and take enforcement action as necessary,” Pollard said. “The employees of Kush 20 House have been removed from the premises at 1644 E. Walnut, and there is no further cannabis activity being conducted at the location.” Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday last_img read more

More Indonesians tolerant of homosexuality, though vast majority still say no: Pew survey

first_imgIn its 2015 report, Pew Research Center ranked Indonesia in third place among countries that highly regard religion, with 97 percent of people in the country saying religion was very important to them.Although the 2019 study showed a slight improvement for Indonesia, its people’s level of acceptance of homosexuality is the second-lowest among other countries surveyed.The nation of 268 million people shared the same spot with Tunisia, where 9 percent also said homosexuality should be accepted. Nigeria is the country with the lowest level of acceptance of homosexuality at 7 percent.Homosexuality is not illegal in Indonesia — except in conservative Aceh with its strict Islamic laws — however, sentiment against the LGBT community has persisted in the country over the years.The anti-LGBT rhetoric hit a new high in 2016, with an unprecedented flood of inflammatory statements and crackdowns against the minority group. Intimidation and persecution against them still persist to this day.Read also: Recent cases of persecution set back LGBT rights advocacyMeanwhile, in the neighboring country Philippines, 73 percent of respondents agreed that homosexuality should be accepted by society, according to the study.Countries such as the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Spain, France and Germany were also placed in the higher ranks with more than 70 percent acceptance for homosexuality.Although majorities in 16 of the 34 surveyed countries in 2019 said homosexuality should be accepted, the think tank’s report showed that the global divide remains.While 94 percent of respondents in Sweden — the country with the highest level of acceptance on the list — agreed on acceptance of homosexuality, only 7 percent in Nigeria shared the same sentiment.”But even with these sharp divides, views are changing in many of the countries that have been surveyed since 2002, when the Center first began asking the question of whether homosexuality should be accepted by society or not on its international surveys,” the report said.In many of the countries surveyed, there have been double-digit increases in acceptance of homosexuality between the 2002 and 2019 studies, including a 21-point increase in South Africa and a 19-point increase in South Korea.Across the 34 countries surveyed, a median of 52 percent agreed that homosexuality should be accepted with 38 percent saying that it should be discouraged.Topics : Public acceptance of homosexuality in Indonesia has improved slightly in the past few years, a recently published study by Pew Research Center suggests, though the level remains low compared with those of other countries.The report — which polled 38,426 respondents across 34 countries from May to October last year — found that only 9 percent of Indonesians agreed that homosexuality should be accepted by society, an increase from only 3 percent in 2013.Most respondents in the world’s largest Muslim-majority country disagreed, with 80 percent of them saying homosexuality should be discouraged. The US-based think tank said it found that public opinion on the acceptance of homosexuality in each society remained sharply divided by country, region and economic development, despite major changes in laws and norms in many countries regarding same-sex marriage and the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people.Read also: Of coming out and acceptance: LGBT youth seek peace in conservative IndonesiaThe report also suggested that attitudes on the acceptance of homosexuality were shaped by the country where the polled respondents lived, as it found that people in wealthier and more developed economies are “generally more accepting of homosexuality” than those in poorer and less-developed economies.”Religion and its importance in people’s lives also shape opinions in many countries. For example, in some countries, those who are affiliated with a religious group tend to be less accepting of homosexuality than those who are unaffiliated,” Pew Research Center said in its 2019 report,” Political ideology also plays a role in the acceptance of homosexuality.”last_img read more

PH cyclists Aquino, Salamat fall short

first_imgBut it was Vietnam’s Thi Tat Nguyen, who took the gold, Ju Pha Som of Malaysia silver and Julatip Maneephan — the rider on Salamat’s crosshairs — bronze. Salamat was fourth.“The Thai rider is a very good sprinter,” Salamat said. “Unfortunately, my tactic of closely guarding her didn’t work as other riders saw it as an opportunity to attack.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’She will still see action in the individual mass start on Wednesday. There is no ITT this SEA Games.Filipino rider Jerry Aquino also bombed out in the men’s action. MOST READ Mangrobang can finally get good night’s sleep after gold medal win National Historical team rescues Amorsolos, artifacts from Taal 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano LATEST STORIES View comments Albay to send off disaster response team to Batangas 2 nabbed in Bicol drug stings Teen gunned down in Masbatecenter_img 787 earthquakes recorded in 24 hours due to restive Taal Volcano FILE PHOTO – Cyclist Marella Vania Salamat holds up the flag after winning a gold medal. RAFFY LERMAKUALA LUMPUR — Marella Vania Salamat tried to close in with tough, European-trained Thai rider but it backfired badly as she got pinned down in the mad dash to the finish out of the podium Monday in cycling criterium race.The last Southeast Asian Games champion in individual time trial was part of the 11-woman lead pack that charged to the finishing at Dataran Putrajaya all at the same time, one hour, two minutes and nine seconds.ADVERTISEMENT Vilma Santos, Luis Manzano warn public of fake account posing as her Aquino fell short to finish fourth in the men’s side, behind Mohd Harrif Saleh of Malaysia (59:34.77), Tanawut Sanikwhati of Thailand (59:34.79) and Mohd Zamri Saleh of Malaysia (59:34.88).Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles02:11SEA GAMES 2019: PH’s Nesthy Petecio boxing featherweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)08:07Athletes treated to a spectacle as SEA Games 2019 officially ends06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold05:02SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball05:21Drama in karate: Tsukii ‘very sad’ over coach’s bullying, cold shoulder03:24PH’s James Palicte boxing light welterweight final (HIGHLIGHTS)last_img read more

Insurance companies breaking law by not reporting suspected fraud cases – Doherty

first_imgInsurance companies have been accused of breaking the law by failing to report suspected fraudulent cases to gardaí.Sinn Féin finance spokesman Pearse Doherty told the companies they have a legal obligation to report suspicions of fraud, or they could face up to three years in prison.The accusations were made as representatives of Aviva, Zurich and AIG appeared before the Finance Committee. The companies were asked to detail the percentage of claims they dealt with that were fraudulent.John Farrell, head of claims at Aviva, said: “In terms of the personal injuries that we receive, approximately one in five would give rise to fraudulent claims.”He told the committee that Aviva reported about one in five suspected fraudulent claims to gardaí.Declan O’Rourke, general manager at AIG, said that out of 2,500 personal injury cases, 18% were flagged as suspicious, with 10 reported to gardaí and one leading to a conviction in court. Anthony Brennan, chief executive of Zurich, said his company had 2,700 injury claims last year, and 100 were investigated. He added that only four were reported to gardaí.Mr Brennan added: “Our fraud savings from those cases were roughly €15m, which is 6% or 7% of the total premium income.”Mr Doherty replied: “I don’t understand because you’ve got a situation where an insurance company didn’t pay out on claims that were made because you believe they were fraudulent. Only four of them were reported to the gardaí.“How does that sit with Section 19 of the Criminal Justice Act, where you are under an obligation, personally, and as a company, to report suspicions of fraud to the gardaí, and failure to do so could result in up to three years imprisonment?“There is a legal obligation on insurance companies to report suspicions of fraud. “Your company has determined that there were 100 fraudulent claims made in 2018 and 96% of them you haven’t passed that information to the gardaí.Mr Farrell told the committee that in the last three years, Aviva has reported more than 500 cases to gardaí that were suspected fraudulent cases.He told the committee there is a “very real compo culture” in Ireland.The Government has faced calls to tackle the impact of rising insurance premiums and fraudulent claims. The Judicial Council Bill is expected to allow judges to recalculate damages and produce guidelines on personal injury payouts.The Competition and Consumer Protection Commission – the country’s competition watchdog – is also to carry out a major review into public liability insurance costs.Mr O’Rourke also told the committee that Ireland has had “significantly higher” personal injury awards by its courts than other European jurisdictions, with awards for minor injuries on average 4.4 times higher than the UK.He added: “Claims awards and legal costs make up the majority of insurance premiums and this is a key factor in the cost of insurance in Ireland.“The higher awards arise from a combination of factors, including the relatively high award levels for personal injury claims set out in the ‘Book of Quantum’, inconsistency of awards made by the courts, combined with a time-consuming and costly appeal process.”Aviva chief executive John Quinlan said the problems faced by the insurance market became a consumer issue from 2015.He said this arose from significant increases in customer premiums for certain segments of the market and significantly reduced availability.He added: “The business sector experienced an additional challenge in that Aviva, and indeed most of the domestic insurers, reduced capacity for certain segments of the market, for example leisure, and these were replaced primarily by UK-based insurers.“Business customers face an additional challenge – the excessive award levels have created a ‘compo culture’ that is significantly impacting the liability market in Ireland.”Mr Brennan said: “We believe this continued rise in claims costs and volatility has been the key driver of increased insurance premiums and reduced availability of cover in certain lines across the Irish market.“We cannot get away from the fact that the single biggest input into our calculation of insurance premiums is the cost of claims, insurers transfer the risk and costs of claims and we share it across our portfolio.”Insurance companies breaking law by not reporting suspected fraud cases – Doherty was last modified: October 4th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:claimsdonegalinsurance companieslawPearse Dohertylast_img read more

Heritage agency charts new course

first_imgThe Johannesburg City Hall is a colonial architectural jewel in the heart of the city. It boasts a beautiful pipe organ, which was until a few years ago, the largest in the world. A wooden traveling chest with iron banding and lined with blue marbled paper which can be viewed at Groote Schuur in Cape Town. (Images: Sahris) MEDIA CONTACTS • Nicholas Wiltshire   Sahris Project Manager  +27 21 462 4502 RELATED ARTICLES • Trekker site gets heritage status • Africa takes charge of its heritage • Capturing our heritage on camera • New deal to protect Mapungubwe siteTiisetso TlelimaA first of its kind in the world, Sahris, the South African Heritage Resources Agency’s new online heritage resource, catalogues South African historical sites and offers users a unique platform that displays the diversity and richness of the country’s heritage resources.Sahris is a database of heritage sites that includes archaeological and paleontological sites, shipwrecks, graves and burial grounds, battlefields, buildings, cultural landscapes, meteorites and natural sites. Since its launch on 5 August 2012, 6 550 archive developments dating between the 1980s and 2009 have been uploaded.Over 3 500 declared heritage sites are listed on the portal, including the country’s 24 national heritage sites. Notable listings range from Robben Island in the Western Cape to Mapungubwe in Mpumalanga, Kaditshwene in North West, the Sara Bartmann site in Eastern Cape and the Voortrekker Monument in Gauteng.“Recording our past is an important part of our present as it is an essential key to people’s sense of identity,” explained Nicholas Wiltshire, the project manager of Sahris at the South African Heritage Resources Agency (Sahra). Heritage resources were not renewable and arguably we had a much bigger challenge to record these resources than our natural environment, he added.“Documenting and preserving our heritage makes all of our lives more meaningful and we have a lot to learn from our ancestors. For instance, studies in human evolution would not be possible without proper archives being maintained by heritage custodians.”Integrated management systemApproximately 855 people have registered to use the system thus far, and the site’s traffic has grown from 6 000 page views since launch to just over 36 000 page views in November last year.Sahris is the first system in the world where users can view developments in their area and comment on them online. More than 21 000 heritage sites can be viewed, with thousands more still to be loaded this year. These sites contain detailed research information and over a terabyte of photographs have been uploaded and are shared freely under the Creative Commons Licence.It also lists thousands of heritage objects, moveable cultural heritage, declared as such by Sahra in order to control their export. Thousands of heritage impact assessments, together with the Sahra Records of Decision for each proposal, are now easily available online in PDF format, with descriptions.The site provides a heritage management tool to all heritage bodies and custodians of heritage as well as to local planning authorities and provincial heritage resources authorities. “The system enables efficient and co-ordinated management of our heritage and the maximisation of benefit to be attained from our heritage resources by appropriate promotion and use of these resources,” explained Wiltshire.“Ultimately, we would like every South African to use Sahris in some way to learn about their heritage and to engage in the democratic and transparent planning system established in Sahris.” As an integrated management system, it also allows heritage managers to carry out their duties stipulated under the National Heritage Resources Act (NHRA) of 1999, which replaced the old National Monuments Act.Free open source softwareIt took 10 years for the database to be created because at R50-million (about $5.7m), the initial quote for the software was too high. There were also very few people who had the necessary heritage skills blended with a sufficient knowledge of IT to take the project forward, added Wiltshire.The first phase of Sahris was concluded between 2005 and 2006, after a thorough investigation and public participation formulated the scope of what would need to be included. Unfortunately, the quotes for phase two – the actual development of the database – ranged from R18m to R50m. This significantly increased the risks of failure.Three attempts to establish Sahris failed between 2005 and 2011. To achieve the level of functionality required by the NHRA, it is only the recent software revolution created by the open source community around such platforms as Drupal, Joomla, WordPress and others, that has made Sahris possible.“Over the last five years, free open source content management systems have undergone a revolution, with Wikipedia being a notable example of a major success,” said Wiltshire. “This paved the way for a radically different way of solving the development problem for Sahris.”Drupal, the largest free open source content management system, was chosen and the first version of the portal was completed in a little over three months before debugging and testing. This was possible as most of the coding is handled by the modules provided by the Drupal Community. The developer at Sahra applied the modules in a particular configuration for Sahris rather than wrote code from scratch, explained Wiltshire.The portal also has a fully integrated geographic information system (GIS) making use of two modules, called Open Layers and G-map. These modules allow live mapping and input of spatial information into Sahris.“We are running a dedicated map server called Geoserver, which is also a free open source software, and we use this server to help shape up files and spatial overlays such as the latest development footprints and cadastral information,” said Wiltshire. “Sites and developments are seamlessly overlaid and the GIS modules allow the user to navigate information spatially and visually across the landscape.”Although the portal doesn’t document oral histories unless these are related to the history of sites, landscapes or objects, Wiltshire has high expectations that it will cater for more of these forms of records in the future.last_img read more

Africa refocused: images of Ghana

first_imgCompiled by Mary AlexanderPopular images of Africa tend to be of two types: beautiful landscapes and exotic wildlife, or distressing poverty, disease and suffering. But Africa is not a country, easily reduced to stereotypes. It’s a vast, diverse continent with 54 separate countries, well over a thousand languages and a range of cultures, histories and religions. People live, work, love and raise families here, just like anywhere else.In the first in a series of photo galleries refocusing the image of African countries, we look at the West African nation of Ghana, on the coast of the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean. With a population of some 27-million, Ghana is rated the seventh-best governed and fifth-most stable country in Africa, with the continent’s sixth-largest economy.Maths teacher Winston Mills-Compton explains a concept to his class at the Mfantsipim Boys School in the coastal city of Cape Coast. Founded in 1876, the school is one of the oldest in the city, which is the academic centre of Ghana. Former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan was a student at Mfantsipim. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst, World Bank)The mausoleum of Kwame Nkrumah, the first president of post-colonial Ghana, in the capital city of Accra. From 1951 Nkrumah served as the leader of the Gold Coast, the colonial name for the country, oversaw independence from Britain in 1957, and was president of the newly free country until 1966. Ghana was the first sub-Saharan African country to achieve independence from colonial rule. Nkrumah was an influential activist for Pan-Africanism, and a founding member of the Organisation of African Unity. (Photo: Walter Callens, Retlaw Snellac Photography)A young woman in front of the Black Star Monument in Independence Square, Accra. The second-largest city square in the world after Tiananmen Square in China, Independence Square was commissioned by Kwame Nkrumah to honour both the country’s independence in 1957 and a visit to Ghana by British Queen Elizabeth II. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A female shopkeeper takes delivery of goods in Accra. Wholesale and retail trade is one of the most common forms of self-employment for women in Ghana’s cities. (Photo: Arne Hoel, The World Bank)A woman works in a small shop in Accra. Women make up 43.1% of economically active population of Ghana, most working in the informal sector and in food crop farming. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A baby lies on a bed protected with a mosquito net, which helps prevent the spread of malaria. Ghana’s attempts to control the disease, a major cause of poverty and low productivity, began in the 1950s. The country’s Roll Back Malaria initiative was launched in 1999. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Young boys train in a boxing club in the Jamestown neighbourhood in eastern Accra. Jamestown and bordering Usshertown are the oldest districts in the city, today home to a fishing community made up largely of the Ga linguistic group. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Young boys train in a boxing club in the Jamestown neighbourhood of Accra. Boxing is Accra’s citywide obsession, and Jamestown the centre of the sport. There are more boxing schools per square mile in Jamestown than anywhere else on earth. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Young boys train in a boxing club in the Jamestown neighbourhood of Accra. Internationally renowned boxers such as Professor Azuma Nelson and Joshua Clottey learned to fight in one of the over 20 boxing clubs in the neighbourhood. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A young boxer and his trainer at a boxing school in the Jamestown neighbourhood of Accra. The trainer’s shirt bears the image of George “Red Tiger” Ashie, an Accra-born international professional fighter who won the African Boxing Union super featherweight title, Universal Boxing Council super featherweight title, and Commonwealth lightweight title. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A student solves a problem in maths class at the Mfantsipim Boys School, one of Ghana’s oldest and best-performing schools, in the city of Cape Coast. The educational centre of Ghana, Cape Coast is home to the University of Ghana, the country’s leading university in teaching and research, as well as Cape Coast Polytechnic, Wesley Girls’ High School, St Augustine College, Adisadel College, Aggrey Memorial Senior High School and Ghana National College. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A Ghanaian girl walking to school. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A billboard advertising mobile phones flanks a cellphone tower in Accra. Ghana is the second-biggest ICT destination in Africa, after South Africa. Mobile phone penetration stands at 27-million, bigger than the national population. A 780-kilometre fibre optic cable is currently being laid across the country. (Photo: Arne Hoel)The grounds of the University of Ghana in the city of Gold Coast, with the entrance to the Balme Library in the distance. The oldest and largest Ghana’s 13 universities and tertiary institutions, it was founded in 1948 as the University College of the Gold Coast. It was originally an affiliate college of the University of London, which supervised its academic programmes and awarded degrees. In 1961 it gained full university status and, today, has some 40 000 students. (Photo: Arne Hoel)The cargo terminal of the port at the city of Tema in southeastern Ghana, on the Gulf of Guinea. Tema harbour is a major export link for goods from land-locked countries to the north of Ghana, such as Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A truck mechanic at the cargo terminal in the port of Tema. The port handles 80% of Ghana’s national exports and imports, including the bulk of the country’s major export product, cocoa. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Relaxing on a four-hour Sunday pleasure cruise on the MV Dodi Princess on Lake Volta, the largest manmade water reservoir by surface area – some 8 502 square kilometres – in the world. Attractions on the Dodi Princess include a highlife band, a wading pool, lunch and an air-conditioned cabin for refuge from the sun. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Traditional Ghanaian fishing boats set out from the ancient settlement of Elmina, once part of a colony Portuguese sea traders built on the coast of Ghana in 1482. Before the Portuguese, the town was called Anomansah, meaning “the perpetual drink”. Elmina was the first European settlement in West Africa, the site of the Africa’s first European colonial war – between Spain and Portugal in 1478 – and for centuries the launch point of the Transatlantic slave trade from West Africa. (Photo: Walter Callens, Retlaw Snellac Photography)Hulls of ships docked at Tema Harbour on the southeastern coast of Ghana. (Photo: Curt Carnemark, World Bank)Boys play on a pirogue, a traditional fishing boat, on a beach in coastal Ghana. Pirogue boats are found all over the world, from Louisiana to Madagascar, but Ghana’s handmade dugouts are possibly the most ornate – carved with motifs, painted in bright colours, and often captioned with biblical quotes and smart sayings. Artisanal fishing in pirogues contributes a great deal to Ghana’s informal economy. (Ghana. Photo: Arne Hoel)A technician supervises the processing of cocoa beans into cocoa liquor at the Golden Tree chocolate plant in the port city of Tema. Cocoa – raw and processed – is Ghana’s main export, even though the cocoa plant is not indigenous to the country. The Golden Tree company produces high-quality cocoa products, including chocolate bars that will not melt in the West African heat. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)The control room at the Takoradi thermal power station in Aboadze, 17 kilometres east of the city of Sekondi-Takoradi on the southwestern coast of Ghana. The country generates electricity from hydropower, fossil fuels, thermal energy and renewable energy sources. Ghana’s power generation infrastructure is so developed it is able to not only meet local needs, but export electricity to neighbouring countries. The country is also committed to carbon-free, renewable energy. A $400-million project to build the largest solar power plant in Africa is likely to go online in 2015. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Traders work on the floor of the Ghana Stock Exchange in Accra. The exchange, established in 1990, is one of the best-performing in Africa. Its composite index rose by 78.8% in 2013. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A trader working the Ghana Stock Exchange in the financial district of Accra. The exchange has 37 listed companies, who saw a 55% increase in value, in US dollar terms, in 2013. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A worker mixes concrete for maintenance of the N1 national road between Accra, the capital of Ghana, and Gold Coast, the country’s centre of education. Roads and highways, the country’s main transport systems, are constantly being upgraded. In 2012 some US$500-million was spent on expanding Ghana’s road network. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)The clock tower of Balme Library reflected in the sunglasses of a student at the University of Ghana in the city of Gold Coast. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A worker feeling the heat at 330 metres underground at the Anglo Ashanti gold mine in Obuasi. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Workers sprayed with sawdust at a lumber factory in Accra. (Photo: Curt Carnemark)A young Ghanaian man holding a child. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A child of Ghana. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Ghanaian girls eat a school-sponsored lunch. (Photo: Arne Hoe)A woman walks through the streets of Accra, Ghana’s capital and major city. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A woman entrepreneur outside her business. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Morning assembly at a rural primary school in Ghana. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A news camera captures proceedings at Ghana’s parliament in Accra. As a former British colony, the country’s lawmaking process is based on the UK parliamentary system. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)The newsroom at the Joy FM radio studios in Accra. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)On air at the Joy FM studios in Accra. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A radio technician at work. (Photo: Arne Hoel)People’s reflections in a water tank in rural Ghana. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Pineapple seedlings being planted in the nursery at Bomart Farms in Nsawam, near Accra. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Traditional Kente cloth on sale at a market in Kumasi, the centre of the Ashanti region of southern Ghana. (Photo: Adam Jones)Air Ghana aircraft on runway at Kotoka International Airport in Accra. The carrier provides cargo and passenger services throughout West and Central Africa. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Buildings in Accra’s financial district. (Photo: JB Dodane, Flickr)last_img read more

Relief package inadequate, says Uddhav

first_imgCalling the ₹10,000-crore relief package announced by Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis for farmers hit by unseasonal rain “grossly inadequate”, Shiv Sena chief Uddhav Thackeray on Sunday demanded that the government provide ₹25,000 per hectare as compensation to farmers without any conditions attached.The Sena chief, who toured parts of Aurangabad district to assess crop damage, parried questions on the tussle between the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and the Sena over government formation, merely saying the people would come to know soon enough if his party would be in power.“The damage to crops is so extensive that the government must immediately give recompense of at least ₹25,000- ₹50,000 per hectare for these farmers… nothing will happen in the ₹10,000 crore package announced,” Mr. Thackeray said, stating that the farmers stared at an existential crisis because of this ‘wet famine.’At a time of fraught relations with ally BJP, the Sena president’s criticism of the relief package chimed in with that of the Nationalist Congress Party’s (NCP), which dismissed the assistance as “a joke.” When asked if his party would form the new government to ensure help to distressed farmers, Mr. Thackeray refrained from giving a direct answer and merely said it was “inappropriate” to speak of government formation at a time when farmers were suffering. Dig at FadnavisThe Sena chief, however, took a swipe at Mr. Fadnavis, remarking: “Despite the monsoon withdrawing, it seems to be saying mi punha yein (I shall return)… now, this has created fear among people.”Mr. Thackeray was referring to Mr. Fadnavis’s oft-repeated assertion of mi punha yein (‘I shall return’) during the Assembly election campaign that he would easily return as chief minister for a second term.Mr. Thackeray also took jibes at the Narendra Modi-led government at the Centre, saying it was New Delhi’s “duty” to help Maharashtra’s farmers in their hour of crisis. “The State has given its wholehearted blessing to the ruling party at the Centre by voting it back to power in the general election. When the Prime Minister had come to Ausa in Latur ahead of the Lok Sabha polls, I had told him the people will give you their blessings if you assure relief during drought. I now expect the Centre to extricate Maharashtra’s farmers from this crisis,” he said.The Sena chief had toured drought-hit parts of the State before a particularly acrimonious run-up to his party sealing the alliance with the BJP before the general election.Warning to banksHe exhorted crop insurance companies do away with cumbersome documentation and not create impediments while giving insurance aid to farmers. “I also urge banks to behave in a humane manner in this grave hour facing farmers,” he said, warning that Shiv Sainiks would take to task any financial institution that created obstacles in disbursing credit to farmers. “There is a need to give succour to farmers and not conduct surveys via helicopters. The farmers’ subsistence crops have been destroyed in one night at many places,” Mr. Thackeray said, remarking that the despair had reached such a point that farmers were contemplating extreme steps.Appealing to farmers not to commit suicide, the Shiv Sena chief said his party stood firmly behind them and would leave no stone unturned to provide them just assistance.last_img read more

Pingris wants to see more from Acox amid subpar showing in semis

first_img“As an import, I’m not satisfied,” Pingris said in Filipino after Star suffered a 98-74 beatdown in Game 2 Tuesday night.Acox is known for his rebounding and that’s also the primary reason why Star opted to replace the prolific scorer Malcolm Hill.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutHe is posting 14 boards a game in the semis. But with the situation that his team is in, he needs to do more than that if the Hotshots would keep their season alive in Game 3 on Thursday.On the other hand, Allen Durham is playing like the reigning Best Import and is showing why he’s tipped to win the award again. Stalzer returns to PSL, jumps ship from Foton to Petron BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City MOST READ LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Read Next PBA IMAGESVeteran Star forward Marc Pingris wants to see more production from import Kris Acox, who has been subpar in the Hotshots’ semifinals series against the Meralco Bolts.Through two games, Acox only has had little to show on offense, averaging just 8 points on 35% shooting from the field.ADVERTISEMENT Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  “It’s going to be hard [to win in Game 3] but we’re going to try. It’s really going to be tough.” Durham has been nothing short but menacing, averaging 22 points, 24 rebounds and 4.5 assists in the semis.But the Hotshots’ woes aren’t just due to Acox’s poor play.Pingris said the locals should also step up.In Game 2, Star only had two players in double-digit scoring with Mark Barroca tallying 16 points. The other was Mon Abundo, the third-string point guard, who got extended playing time with Paul Lee nursing a left knee injury.“We also need to help him (Acox). It shouldn’t be just all him. The locals also need to help out,” said Pingris, who also has his fair share of struggles in the series, averaging 4.5 points and 5.5 rebounds.ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

a month agoMan Utd midfielder Paul Pogba fit to face Rochdale

first_imgMan Utd midfielder Paul Pogba fit to face Rochdaleby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United midfielder Paul Pogba is fit to face Rochdale in the Carabao Cup tomorrow.United host the League One side in the third round of the Carabao Cup and will be boosted by the return of Pogba, who has missed the last three games against Leicester, Astana and West Ham.Solskjaer said: “He’ll probably get some minutes against Rochdale. “But we definitely think he’s ready for Arsenal.”Also returning is 17-year-old striker Mason Greenwood, fresh from his match-winning goal against Astana in the Europa League on Thursday. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Residential school history still mystery to some First Nation youth

first_img(Truth and Reconciliation Commission Chair Murray Sinclair speaks during the opening day of the TRC’s seventh national event in Edmonton. In foreground is the Brentwood Box.)By Jorge Barrera APTN National News EDMONTON–After viewing a black and white photograph of a group of boys from an Indian residential school, Katie Saulteaux split her canvas diagonally, from corner to corner, and painted one side all in red.Saulteaux, 14, said she used red to signify the worry she felt for the boys in the historical photo.“All those little boys are going through harm, being traumatized and abused,” she said.Saulteaux is from Paul First Nation, which sits about 80 kilometres west of Edmonton where the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) is holding its seventh and final national event.She was among several dozen students sitting around tables in the basement of the Shaw Conference Centre Thursday trying to translate what they learned into art. The theme of the opening day of the four-day event was, “Fostering Reconciliation Through Education.”About 2,200 hundred students from across Alberta attended the day’s events which featured panels, throat singing, fiddling, a hip hop performance and other musical acts.Alberta had the highest number of operating residential schools with 25 and is currently home to about 12,000 residential school survivors.Students paints their reactions to historical Indian residential school photos Eyeing her half-painted canvas, Salteaux said she planned to add blue paint to her artwork.“It represents sadness about how the boys had been treated,” she said.Saulteaux said she knew little about residential schools before today. She said she didn’t know why she was never taught about what happened.“I am kind of disappointed I didn’t know about it before,” she said.Megan Russell, 16, also said she didn’t know a lot about residential schools. The Grade 10 student from Lloydminster, Alta., said she know felt a responsibility to tell others about what she learned.“I didn’t know too much about it and it’s really changed my state of mind,” said Russell, who is Gitxsan from British Columbia.Isadore Alexis-Paul, 13, from Alexis Nakota Sioux First Nation, said the TRC event gave him knowledge he lacked.“It’s cool actually hearing about this history,” he said. “I find it interesting learning this because I didn’t know….I think it probably will change the way I see things.”Residential school survivor Satoe, 65, said it didn’t surprise him that children from First Nation communities knew little about such a dark chapter in history.“Some people don’t want to talk about it because they’re too ashamed,” said Satoe, who is from the Blood Tribe and went to the St. Mary’s residential school for five years beginning in 1955.Satoe described his time at residential school as “really awful” and most of what he remembered involved forced labour.“You can’t forgive ever, though people ask for forgiveness,” he said. “I don’t think there will ever be reconciliation.”TRC Chair Murray Sinclair said that while reconciliation is one of the aims of the commission’s work, it will be up to the youth to finish that task.“We will not achieve reconciliation within the term of this commission. We will not achieve reconciliation in our lifetime,” said Sinclair.With one year left in the commission’s mandate, Sinclair said the work will transfer to other hands.“The obligation of all this work goes back to the people of this country, to you,” said Sinclair. “This is not an Aboriginal problem, it’s a Canadian problem.”Throughout the over century-long existence of residential schools, 150,000 Indigenous children were processed through about 130 schools. Thousands never made it home and many died from disease or violence.The TRC was created as a result of a multi-billion dollar, class-action settlement agreement between residential school survivors, Ottawa and the churches which ran the schools.The TRC has already held national events in Winnipeg, Inuvik, NWT, Halifax, Saskatoon, Montreal and Vancouver.The TRC will also be holding a closing ceremony in [email protected]@JorgeBarreralast_img read more