Suspicious circumstances ruled out following unexplained death

first_img Previous articleDefence Forces members prepare for ‘Pitch Battle’ this St Patrick’s DayNext articleYeats Scholarship Launched by UL on St Patrick’s Day Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie WhatsApp Facebook Linkedin NewsLocal NewsSuspicious circumstances ruled out following unexplained deathBy Staff Reporter – March 16, 2015 894 Emailcenter_img Twitter Advertisement Print Andrew CareySign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up [email protected] have said there will be no further criminal investigation into the death of an East Clare man after he collapsed at a house on Hyde Road on Sunday night last. The 31-year-old man was pronounced dead at the University Hospital Limerick a short time later. The cause of death was unexplained prior to a post mortem examination but Gardai did not believe there to be an suspicious circumstances surrounding the death. Those findings were confirmed this Monday afternoon following an examination carried out by State pathologist Prof Marie Cassidy. The post mortem concluded, that the Clare man did not die as a result of foul play or from violent circumstances, however the cause of death has still to be established.Toxicology tests and tissue samples have been sent to the State laboratory for further analysis.Gardai say that the 31-year-old man had been socialising with friends at the house on Hyde Road when he collapsed at 8pm  Gardaí say the results of the post mortem mean there is no criminal investigation underway and a fileIs being prepared for the office of the coroner. The house which had been sealed off has now been released.last_img read more

EBRD offers $94.2m loan to ETYFA to acquire FSRU

first_img EBRD offers $94.2m loan to ETYFA to acquire FSRU. (Credit: European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.) The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has agreed to provide €80m ($94.2m) funding to Natural Gas Infrastructure Company of Cyprus (ETYFA) to acquire a floating storage and regasification unit (FSRU).The funding will be utilised by ETYFA for the development of the infrastructure relatd to FSRU.Permanently anchored approximately 1.3 km off the coast of Limassol in Vasilikos Bay, the FSRU will be directly connected to the adjacent Vasilikos power station.According to EBRD, the project is a critical component in the energy strategy of Cyprus that will provide significant energy security, environmental and economic impacts.FSRU will replace heavy fuel oil with cleaner natural gas in CyprusIt is said that nearly 90% of the electricity supply in the island depends on the importation of petroleum products. The island’s energy system is isolated, without any interconnections for electricity or gas.The new project is expected to replace expensive and polluting heavy fuel oil with cleaner natural gas in the country.EBRD Energy Europe, the Middle East and Africa head Harry Boyd-Carpenter said: “This is a milestone project for Cyprus and we are proud to support it.“The project will be a major step forward in Cyprus’s decarbonisation trajectory. It will reduce both global and local pollution without compromising the island’s long-term transition to a low-carbon energy sector.”In addition to loan from EBRD, EU is also providing a €101m ($118.9m) of funding for the project under the Connecting Europe Facility.The remaining project costs will be met through  a €150 million loan from the EIB and a €43 million equity contribution from the Electricity Authority of Cyprus (EAC).Recently, ETYFA has awarded a contract to Hill International to provide owner’s engineer services for the Cyprus LNG import terminal project.The project includes a former LNG carrier with a storage capacity of 136,000 cubic meters that will be converted to FSRU in China. The loan from EBRD will be used to acquire a floating storage and regasification unit (FSRU) as well as the development of related infrastructurelast_img read more

Great American Taxi Whisk Listeners Away With “Dr. Feelgood’s Traveling Medicine Show”

first_imgGreat American Taxi transports listeners to the musical intersection of jam band, blues, rock and Americana on their new album, Dr. Feelgood’s Traveling Medicine Show. While it is said that “laughter is the best medicine,” good music is surely comes in a close second. For their latest release, Great American Taxi continue to show that, whoever has their hand on the wheel, the direction and destination stay the same.The twists and turns in the band’s lineup seem to have finally settled into a cohesive unit that is delivering a sound far greater than the sum of its parts. Not to say that newly minted front man Arthur Lee Land, guitarist Jim Lewin, keyboard player Chad Staehly and company ever strayed from the Gram Parsons spirit the band was forged to follow.“We Can Run” opens things up with a blast of honky-tonk blues that serves as a fitting introduction for new vocalist Land. There are similarities to former vocalist Todd Snider in tone, but similarities are just on the surface level. Songs like “Out On The Town” quickly help illuminate the more earnest direction of the band. It’s easy to see a more whimsical take on the tune with previous line-ups but the more heart felt approach presented here is impressive and distinct.The slow burn blues of “Sunshiny Days” shows a understanding of build and release that lets Land and Lewin trade some powerful licks over booming bass and drums. A groovy banjo intro to “All The Angels” is placed perfectly on the track listing, lifting the slowly darkening mood instantly. The religious iconography in the lyrics serve as sparse cover for the universal advice the band is doling out on the track. “Home” keeps the expansive vibe going with jazz brush drumming and banjo counterpointing lilting pedal steel guitar and fiddle that perfectly underscore the melancholy spirit of the tune.The title track, “Dr. Feelgood’s Traveling Medicine Show,” comes on like a fever dream version of old-timey carnival music with a psychedelic twist for good measure. The wry songwriting on the album reaches a peak on “Like There’s No Yesterday” giving Jimmy Buffett some unexpected competition in the “Looking back on a life from a pirate’s perspective” sub-genre. Closing out the album, “Mother Lode” unwinds in a flat spiral, evoking a hopeful but weary look at the future.Over the course of Dr.Feelgood’s Traveling Medicine Show, Great American Taxi shows great comfort in a wide variety of song styles and sonic dimensions. Though past iterations have seemed to focus more on the person at the front of the stage this is the first effort that feels like a true group effort. If GAT can continue with this level sanctified mix of righteous music and insightful lyrical content, then let’s hope this configuration is here to stay.last_img read more

Trail Mix: The Barter Theater Jams in January

first_imgBen Sollee plays January Jams in Abingdon’s Barter Theater on Friday.I have been fortunate to attend many wonderful dramatic productions at the venerable Barter Theater in Abingdon. Virginia’s official state theater, the Barter opened in 1933 with a peculiar caveat – if patrons couldn’t afford the 35 cent admission price, they could barter their way in with homegrown produce. It was a win/win situation – locals got to see the plays and the actors were plied with farm fresh vittles. While I have never been lucky enough to trade a few tomatoes or cucumbers for a seat inside, I have happily taken my seat to watch the cast of the Barter Theater perform some incredible plays – To Kill A Mockingbird, Tarzan, and A Christmas Story are but three of the shows I have seen there.Despite my familiarity with the comfortable confines of the Barter Theater, I was unprepared for what I experienced last weekend. For lack of a better term, the Barter was rockin’.For the last three years, a concert series – January Jams – has taken up residency at the Barter when the theater’s cast takes the month off from performing. Promoted by the town’s Convention & Visitor’s Bureau and the Abingdon Main Street program, January Jams has brought some tremendous artists to perform in the theater. Last year, among others, Marty Stuart, Iris Dement, St. Paul & The Broken Bones, and Jason Isbell were on the bill. This year’s line up has been similarly impressive – Jill Andrews, formerly of the everybodyfields, and David Bromberg have already performed, while Mavis Staples and Greensky Bluegrass have shows upcoming.Last Saturday night, it was only fitting that the iconic Barter Theater played host to a collection of icons. The Blind Boys of Alabama, an unparalleled institution in gospel music that has been touring for much of the last seven decades, along with rising blues star Jarkeus Singleton, took the near capacity crowd on a spiritual journey of the music of the Deep South. This was my first time attending a January Jams show and I was much impressed with how this classic theater morphed into a first class music room. Without a doubt, the Barter ranks up there with some of my favorite theaters around the region, which includes the Jefferson Theater in Charlottesville, the Paramount Centre in Bristol, and the Tennessee Theater in Knoxville. The Barter is intimate, bordering on cozy, with just 500 seats, the sound was great, and the theater has already developed a reputation for supplying artists with warm and appreciative audiences.Sara Cardinale, as the town of Abingdon’s Special Events Coordinator, has been instrumental in the development and growth of January Jams. To her, the concert series is a special event that serves dual purposes.“Here at the Convention & Visitor’s Bureau, we believe that a good community event is a good tourist event. An event that makes the community happy will make a tourist happy. The goal is to have more feet on the street.”Cardinale was effusive when talking about getting live music in the Barter Theater.“The Barter Theater puts on over one hundred shows a year, but January is their time to rehearse for next year, so there aren’t any shows going on. We decided to try to keep something happening in the theater, and that is how January Jams was born. Not having to drive to Asheville to hear great live music is pretty excellent, and the caliber of musicians who have come and been delighted by our little town is awesome.”Brent Treash, an Abingdon resident and avid live music fan, echoes these sentiments.“January Jams has quickly become woven into Abingdon’s social fabric. Enthusiastic crowds are able to see legendary musicians perform in a historic theater that rarely hosts live music. Because Abingdon is now embracing live music, I get to see these amazing musicians playing virtually on my back porch.”This weekend, January Jams wraps up its month of shows with two tremendous offerings. On Saturday, the aforementioned jamgrass heavyweights Greensky Bluegrass and Virginia folk rockers The Last Bison will play.On Friday, noted folkie cellist Ben Sollee, along with David Wax Museum and Cereus Bright, will perform.Ben Sollee is a native Kentuckian, having been born in Lexington, and he began playing the cello in high school. His career, much like contemporaries like Bela Fleck and Chris Thile, has been wide and varied, and Sollee’s sound is difficult to pigeonhole. Sollee draws from a vast array of influences, and you are just as likely to hear him accompanying the Charlotte Ballet or find scoring films or riding his bike – while toting his cello on a trailer – like he did on the way to perform at Bonnaroo in 2009. Sollee has been a member of both the Woodsongs Old-Time Radio Hour house band and Abigail Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet, has performed in vaunted concert halls around the world, including Carnegie Hall and the Lincoln Center, and has an impressive collection of releases to his credit.Trail Mix and the January Jams promoters are happy to give you a shot at taking in the show of Friday for free. All it takes is a simple email. Hit me up at [email protected] with an email and put BEN SOLLEE in the subject line. A lucky winner of two passes will be chosen from the emails received by noon on Friday.last_img read more