Bulldogs prepare for unknown at Brookvale

first_imgThe Sea Eagles have a new playmaking and hooking combination, an unrecognisable forward pack from last year and a completely new coaching staff, but Canterbury players say there are still a few givens whenever you take on the Sea Eagles on their home patch.”You know they’re going to turn up, they obviously have a new coach and a few new players but the mentality of Manly’s never changed,” Dogs prop Aiden Tolman said.”You know when you play them you have to be on your game and it’s going to be a good test for us Round 1, over there, away from home, the crowd’s always against you and they’ve got a good side so it’s going to be a tough game but we want to get the season off with a win.”They’ve got a new forward pack but it’s the same faces we’ve played in other teams. It won’t make the job any easier.”Lock Greg Eastwood has played alongside some of Manly’s new faces; like many of his teammates he once wore blue and white with enforcer Marty Taupau, while Eastwood has more recently played Test football for New Zealand with Taupau and another new Manly recruit, Lewis Brown.”They’ve got a new side and a new coach so we don’t know what to expect; we’ve just got to focus on our own game,” Eastwood said.”They’ve recruited real well this year. There was a lot of talk they needed to add size to their pack and they’ve done that. You know what you’re going to get with [Taupau]. He’s going to try and run over you every chance he gets.”Nate Myles has been real consistent over a long period and Lewis Brown is going to do a job for them. We’ve got to limit their metres and help our side get on the front foot.”It’s always a hard game going to Brookvale, even when they’ve got a few injuries here and there, you know what they’re going to do. They don’t want to disappoint their fans, especially at their home ground they’ll come out strong but I’m sure our boys will do the job.”Blues back-rower Josh Jackson suggested his old teammate Taupau would add plenty of energy and physicality to Manly’s middle.”They’ve got a fair few other new players there. I think they’ve done really well with the players they’ve brought in and a new coach as well so it’s a little bit unknown exactly what they’re going to throw up at us,” Jackson said.”They’ve done really well to get those players in, they’re all quality players, they’re all representative players.”He added it was hard for his side to know what to focus on with so many new players and a new coach.”If we can just match their energy early and hang in there for 80 minutes we’ll give ourselves every chance.”The first couple of weeks is always a bit of a trial period to see how those things go and you adjust your game accordingly,” Jackson said.Jackson also backed his side’s big pack to adapt to the reduced interchanges and shot clock as well as any side.”I think we should be all right; we’ve got [props] Aiden Tolman and James Graham who could punch out 80 if they had to and probably do it quite easily, then myself and Tony Williams usually play longer minutes as well so I think we should be all right,” he said.last_img read more

That doesnt mean things are cut and dried by just

first_imgThat doesn’t mean things are cut and dried by just adding support for containers to vSphere, however. VMware, said Adams, deals with IT admins, not with developers directly. As a result, supporting containers doesn’t mean just offering the ability to package and run containers in your infrastructure.“IT admins say, ‘I get you like containers, but you have to give me enterprise capabilities: security, network, data persistence, SLAs, and a consistent level of management,’ ” said Adams. “Since VMworld last year, we’ve been dropping things piece by piece to make all this work.”Today, containers are supported through Project Bonneville, an effort to make vSphere see containers as if they were virtual machines, and vice versa. This means vSphere users can now deploy and manage containers and virtual machines without caring which one is which.VMware is preparing the first update for vSphere, which will arrive later this year. It will include updates to vMotion, which includes cross-data-center syncing, designed to keep ISO files and other info consistent across data centers. This feature also helps to keep virtual machines synced around the globe.Going forward, Adams said that containers will continue to see first-class support from VMware. The end goal is to provide enterprise-grade support, management and services for containers in the enterprise. While he admitted this will be a lot of work, he reiterated that VMware is committed to the task. VMware doesn’t care if you use virtual machines or containers at this point. The company made this abundantly clear as it opened its annual VMworld conference in San Francisco yesterday. It took this opportunity to discuss improvements in vSphere 6.0, which allow containers to become first-class citizens of the data center.Michael Adams, director of vSphere product marketing at VMware, said that vSphere 6.0 can deal with hybrid clouds in a few ways. While it can now handle virtual machines and containers as if they were the same thing, it can also spin those instances up internally or externally, providing what enterprises think of as a more traditional hybrid cloud model.(Related: Other news out of VMworld 2015)Adams said that the interest in containers has fueled VMware to build toward support and the types of enterprise offerings needed to make containers viable. “We’ve been dropping a lot of bread crumbs around what we were going to do with containers,” he said. “A lot of it was about how do we bring together the best of both worlds. Developers like containers because they’re fast and portable.”last_img read more