Postcode Lottery Green Challenge offers 500,000 euros

first_imgFor the fourth consecutive year, people and organisations around the world are invited to send in their ideas for reducing CO2 emissions to the Postcode Lottery Green Challenge. The best sustainable product or service will win €500,000. Two runners-up will each win €100,000.If your green product or service combats the production of greenhouse gases and scores high on design, user-friendliness and quality, you could win. Each entrant must submit a detailed business plan so that the Challenge’s expert jury can determine whether the idea is viable.In late September, the seven finalists will present their ideas to an international expert jury and an audience of invited guests at the multiday cross-media conference PICNIC’10. The winner will also be introduced to potential customers and business partners.Last year’s winner was from the UK: Dean Gregory runs The Power Collective, which makes all-but-invisible windmills for use on peaked roofs.www.greenchallenge.info/greenchallenge Tagged with: Funding AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Postcode Lottery Green Challenge offers 500,000 euros  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 9 June 2010 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Postgraduate service fair to feature over 70 service organizations

first_imgThe Center for Social Concerns (CSC) will host a fair to introduce students to an array of postgraduate service opportunities Wednesday from 5-8 p.m. at the Joyce Center Concourse.The fair will feature representatives from over 70 service organizations situated across the world. According to the event website, the organizations confront topics such as poverty, immigration and refugee resettlement, environmental justice, healthy food, wellness, housing and homelessness, youth development and elder care.“What’s wonderful is there will be organizations that need people to do all different kinds of work,” Karen Manier, postgraduate service administration lead coordinator at the CSC, said. “No matter what your background is or your interests, you can usually find something that would be of interest to you.”Manier said the goal of the fair never differs: It aims to both educate students about postgraduate service — what it is, what it offers and how powerful it can be — and facilitate the process for students who want to do postgraduate service.“If there’s a passion that you have around a particular social issue, [postgraduate service] allows you to not only do good work and help people but also to learn more about things so you can decide to get involved with something in a different way or level,“ Manier said.According to the CSC’s website, though postgraduate service is “basically a full-time job in a non-profit organization,” service members typically receive a stipend and benefits in exchange for working with individuals and communities in need.Though bringing a resume to the event and wearing business casual attire can be helpful, Manier said, the service fair is different from a regular job search in that such formalities are not necessary and any question students ask service organizations is “fair game.”“Everyone wants the same thing, which is to make the world a better place,” Manier said. “These are folks who prefer to have lengthier conversations with the people they’re talking to because it allows them to get to know you better.”About 7 percent of the class of 2016 participated in postgraduate service, totaling to about 150 students, Manier said. The largest portion of those students came from the College of Arts and Letters, which saw 17 percent of its graduates commit to service.“I hope people take advantage of this opportunity, because Notre Dame students are extremely well-liked by service organizations because they’re so well-prepared,” Manier said. “[Students] come in with so much service experience already, tend to do service while here and are smart, energetic and good leaders. Our students are ideal candidates, so these service organizations really want to meet them.”Manier said she would recommend all students, regardless of grade level, to attend the free event.“Even if [undergraduates] just start with conversations now and get a sense of the landscape, they’ll be in a much better position going into their senior year when they’re trying to make those decisions,” Manier said. “It’ll give them a chance to see what’s out there.”As an alumnus of Notre Dame and now the director and founder of the Ignatiun Service Corps, a service organization that will be at the fair, Tom King said he has worked with many students who found their gifts and life-long passions through service.“You can have great, experienced people who have done all kinds of justice work for four years, and they’re a perfect match,” King said. “But then you can have someone that was not engaged [in service] at all, and they can be a perfect match as well. I think that anybody could do it. Just have an open heart.”King said he considers college graduates to be in a privileged class that is required to help “those on the margins.”“The programs all want the student to find the program that’s best for him or her,” King said. “That’s the beautiful thing about a fair like that. The programs want you to find the right match, so they may even lead you to another program. I never feel a spirit of competition among the programs.”Junior spanish and music major Katie Ward, who helped run the service fair last year, said she felt uplifted seeing the positive impact the service organizations have in different communities and the roles that were available to students through them.“I would highly recommend attending the postgraduate service fair, even if you have not considered doing postgraduate service before,” Ward said. “The postgraduate service fair can help you discern whether you feel called to do postgraduate service and also help you see more specifically what organizations might interest you. It’s a laid-back atmosphere, and everyone just really wants to get to know you and build relationships.”Tags: Center for Social Concerns, CSC, postgraduate service, postgraduate service fairlast_img read more

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Working on a Movie Musical About an Adventurous Monkey

first_img View Comments Lin-Manuel Miranda(Photo: Emilio Madrid-Kuser) Not only is the man non-stop—he’s also speeding up. Sony Pictures Animation has fast tracked the movie musical Vivo, featuring 11 songs written by Hamilton mastermind Lin-Manuel Miranda. The film, featuring a script by Miranda’s In the Heights collaborator Quiara Alegría Hudes, is slated for a December 18, 2020 release, according to Deadline.For those attempting to keep track of all of Miranda’s screen projects, let’s break this down: Moana just landed at the top of the box office charts; Mary Poppins Returns premieres on Christmas Day, 2018; he’s teaming up with Alan Menken for a new The Little Mermaid; he’s creative producing and the man behind the music for the The Kingkiller Chronicle film and TV series; the Weinstein Company is at work on bringing In the Heights to the big screen.Kirk DeMicco (The Croods) will direct the new movie, which was originally developed by DreamWorks Animation shortly following the success of In the Heights. The story follows a capuchin monkey with a passion for adventure and music who travels from Havana to Miami. This is not to be confused with that Stephen Schwartz animated movie musical from DreamWorks featuring Lea Michele as a Bollywood superstar monkey.last_img read more

Tycoon and a tea-seller’s son: Trump, Modi forge bonhomie

first_imgIn Gujarat’s capital Ahmedabad, large billboards with the words “two dynamic personalities, one momentous occasion” and “two strong nations, one great friendship” have gone up across the city.”There’s a lot that Trump and Modi share in common, and not surprisingly these convergences have translated into a warm chemistry between the two,” Michael Kugelman of the Washington-based Wilson Center told AFP.”Personality politics are a major part of international diplomacy today. The idea of closed-door dialogue between top leaders has often taken a backseat to very public and spectacle-laden summitry.”Since assuming the top political office in their respective countries — Modi in 2014 and Trump in 2017 — the two men have been regularly compared to each other. They hail from vastly different backgrounds — Donald Trump is the son of a property tycoon while Narendra Modi is a descendant of a poor tea-seller.Yet the two teetotallers, loved by right-wing nationalists in their home countries, share striking similarities that have seen them forge a close personal bond, analysts say.Ahead of the American leader’s first official visit to India, which begins in Modi’s home state of Gujarat on Monday, the world’s biggest democracy has gone out of its way to showcase the chemistry between them. Trump, 73, and Modi, 69, both command crowds of adoring flag-waving supporters at rallies. A virtual cult of personality has emerged around them, with their faces and names at the centre of their political parties’ campaigns.Nationalist, protectionist A focus of Trump’s administration has been his crackdown on migrants, including a travel ban that affects several Muslim-majority nations, among others, while critics charge that Modi has sought to differentiate Muslims from other immigrants through a contentious citizenship law that has sparked protests.Both promote their countries’ nationalist and trade protectionist movements — Trump with his “America First” clarion call and Modi with his “Make in India” mantra.And while they head the world’s largest democracies, critics have described the pair as part of a global club of strongmen that includes Russia’s Vladimir Putin and Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro.”There are many qualities that Trump and Modi share — a love for political grandstanding and an unshakable conviction that they can achieve the best solutions or deals,” former Indian diplomat Rakesh Sood told AFP.Modi and Trump have sought to use their friendship to forge closer bonds between the two nations, even as they grapple with ongoing tensions over trade and defence.Despite sharing many similarities in style and substance, analysts say there are some notable differences between the pair.Modi is an insider who rose through the ranks of the Bharatiya Janata Party after starting out as a cadre in the militaristic hardline Hindu group Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh.Trump is a businessman and a political outsider who has in some sense taken over the Republican Party.”Modi is a more conventional leader than is Trump in that he hasn’t sought to revolutionise the office he holds in the way that Trump has,” said Kugelman, a longtime observer of South Asian politics.He added that genuine personal connections between leaders of both countries have helped to grow the partnership. “George Bush and Manmohan Singh, Barack Obama and Singh, Obama and Modi, now Modi and Trump — there has been a strong chemistry in all these pairings that has clearly helped the relationship move forward,” he added.Trump has also stood by the Indian leader during controversial decisions, including his revocation of autonomy for Muslim-majority Kashmir and his order for jets to enter Pakistani territory following a suicide bombing.Analysts said the leaders would use the visit to bolster their image with voters. A mega “Namaste Trump” rally in Ahmedabad on Monday will be modelled after the “Howdy, Modi” Houston extravaganza last year when the Indian leader visited the US and the two leaders appeared before tens of thousands of Indian-Americans at a football stadium.”The success of this visit… will have a positive impact on his (Trump’s) re-election campaign and the people of Indian origin who are voters in the US — a majority of them are from Gujarat,” former Indian diplomat Surendra Kumar told AFP.”On the Indian side, the fact that Prime Minister Modi… (shares) such warmth, bonhomie and informality with the most powerful man on Earth adds to his stature… as well as with hardcore supporters.”Topics :last_img read more