Rory Best’s World Cup in doubt

first_imgIreland backs coach Alan Gaffney also admitted that he will looking to tweak his side’s game plan for Saturday night’s match. Against Italy they were direct, taking the ball up through the middle, but they will change their tactics against Wales.“Wales defend in a totally different way to how Italy defend, so we’ll approach Wales a bit differently,” said Gaffney. “Wales have changed their style. They had become a bit predictable, playing an attractive brand of rugby but a predictable one. Full credit to Warren Gatland, Rob Howley and Shaun Edwards, they’ve changed that attack and I believe they are more potent now then they used to be.” Shouldering the burden: Injury could rule Rory Best out of Ireland’s World Cup campaignRORY BEST’S World Cup is in jeopardy after he sprained the AC joint in his right shoulder during the game against Italy on Sunday.Ireland are going to see how the hooker goes in training on Tuesday but admit he’s “definitely doubtful” for the weekend’s quarter-final against Wales and indeed for the remainder of the tournament.It would be a big blow for the Irish. Not only has Best been playing brilliantly at RWC 2011, forming a solid front-row unit with Cian Healy and Mike Ross, but Ireland have already lost Jerry Flannery to injury meaning they could go into the Wales game with the comparably inexperienced Sean Cronin and Damien Varley as their hooking options. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Wales peace deal signed

first_img TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Such has been the acrimony in between the WRU and RRW (Regional Rugby Wales) that there was no joint press conference for the cameras as both sides went their separate ways after signing the Rugby Services Agreement (RSA) which laid out a £60m six-year agreement that would take Welsh rugby into the next decade.What was left, in the wake of an affair that has tested the patience of every Welsh rugby fan, was at least – on the face of it – marked progress.For the avoidance of doubt, the disagreement has always been about money, or the lack of it. The regions felt they were being unfairly starved of the funds that would enable them to compete with English and Irish clubs, while the union was adamant they would not be made bankrupt by the demands of the regions. The regions felt increasingly that a salary cap of £3.5m simply did not give them enough to keep hold of their star players when compared to France –  Toulouse have nearing a £28m annual salary – and this only led to steady flow of international players out of Wales.A rare outing together: Roger Lewis sits with the heads of the regionsNow at least, there seems to be more funds on the table with a sweetener of £500,000 per region on signing the RSA and the WRU guaranteeing £8.7m to the four regions. In that sum £2m has been allocated for dual-contracted players and that will be propped up by £1.3m of money from the Regions. Roughly speaking, dual-contracted players could be picking up a cool £330,000 a year, which should at least allow regions to compete with foreign clubs and keep players in Wales.Elsewhere there is further framework in place to ensure the future of the game. The limit on foreign players has been capped at six per regional squad, plus two time-serving players, in effect, player who serving out their three-year residency rule before becoming eligible for Wales.The responsibility for the Academies is passed back from the WRU to the Regions, where they will be given an annual £600,000 to nurture talent.Further details include the WRU having the right to play up to 13 annual internationals, which will add to the coffers, and a 13-day release window to prepare for Autumn Series and Six Nations fixtures.Another interesting development was the reintroduction of the A side to play a fixture, possibly before the start of the Six Nations, while in the shortened format, the RSA guarantees three players from the regions to be available for Wales Sevens selection. Whether this can work remains to be seen, but a similar law has been in place in England and as with the case of Steffon Armitage, enforced, while Australia, New Zealand and South Africa have loosened their rigid stances.The hard work starts now. Relationships need to be nurtured, trust rebuilt and the common aim of strengthening Welsh rugby as a whole put into force. If that happens, maybe, just maybe, Welsh rugby can prosper in the professional age. Sign on the dotted line: Sam Warburton will be free to play rugby again after a peace deal was signed Peace broke out in Wales early yesterday evening after one of the most protracted, tenuous talks in the history of the professional game. The Group Chief Executive of the WRU, Roger Lewis, who has been heavily criticised during the drawn-out process, said: “The National Dual Contracts represented a radical step forward in our mutual aim of retaining Welsh talent here in Wales.”Chairman of Regional Rugby Wales (RRW) Nigel Short commented: “Following long and detailed negotiations, RRW is satisfied that the new agreement with the WRU creates a fair, progressive and credible foundation to protect and support the best interests of Welsh Rugby into the future; with the core objective of delivering a sustainable and competitive professional game in Wales.“The new agreement is a positive step forward for the long-term benefit of Welsh rugby with plenty of hard work still to be done to ensure that the game in Wales prospers, works in partnership and develops at all levels.”What, perhaps, will be most frustrating to Welsh fans is that British and Irish Lions Leigh Halfpenny, Richard Hibbard and Jonathan Davies may still have been playing in Wales had the agreement had been signed earlier. Wales had already lost Lions George North, Mike Phillips, Jamie Roberts, Dan Lydiate and James Hook who had gone in search of stability and increased riches in the Premiership and Top 14. In effect, the horse has already bolted, and the only hope is that the new agreement will, in time, entice stars back to Wales.One facet that will certainly raise eyebrows is the re-emergence of the fabled ‘Gatland’s law’, where players who choose to play outside Wales will not be available for selection, except for certain exceptional cases – this does not affect existing stars abroad but with come into effect once Warren Gatland picks six dual contract players – targeted players are thought to include Alun Wyn Jones, Taulupe Faletau, Gareth Anscombe, Gethin Jenkins, Alex Cuthbert, Scott Williams, Liam Williams, Ken Owens, Dan Biggar – alongside the only centrally contracted player Sam Warburton who controversially signed up in January.last_img read more

Who is the better All Black: Julian Savea or Jonah Lomu?

first_imgSkillsLomu: The legend was an instinctive player. He had the odd spark of skill, as evidenced with chip-and-chase tries for the Hurricanes or an offload after he’d finished smashing through defenders, but he wasn’t the most deft of athletes. Why? Because he didn’t have to be. The less said about Jonah’s kicking game, the better. Lomu: The big man knew where the try-line was with 37 tries in 63 internationals, and he is still the top scorer in World Cup history with 15 tries in two tournaments. What was impressive about Lomu was the bigger the occasion, the more likely he was to find his way to the try-line.Savea: He has the greatest strike-rate in All Black history with 27 tries in 27 appearances. You could say that one advantage is that he’s in an all-conquering side which has only lost once in two years. Being able to play outside creator-in-chief, Conrad Smith also helps, though Lomu played alongside the likes of Frank Bunce and Tana Umaga who weren’t too shabby!DefenceLomu: For head-on tackles Jonah could destroy opposition attackers, but on the turn Lomu was not the most nimble on his feet, with some joking that he’d need to three-point turn when a kick was put over the top of the defence. Jonah’s workrate around the pitch was also not always the most industriousSavea: He has a very good defensive game – he can mark further infield and chase better, he can turn briskly and he is comfortable under a high ball. His front on tackles, notably against Rob Kearney and Robbie Fruean brought audible gasps from the watching crowds. He can hit. And hit very, very hard. He can also execute a text-book cover tackle, as seen with Marland Yarde’s wrap up this summer.  The master at work: Jonah Lomu scoring at his happy hunting ground of TwickenhamAll Blacks coach Steve Hansen opened the proverbial can of worms last night when he said that, for him, Julian Savea probably offered more as a player than New Zealand great, Jonah Lomu.Like the Ali v Tyson, Pele v Maradona and Bradman v Tendulkar arguments that run and run, this is another discussion that will fire up rugby fans. So, who is the better all-round player? We look at the tale of the tape for these two colossal Kiwis.PowerLomu: Jonah Lomu is arguably the most explosive player ever to grace the field of play. In his pomp, he was virtually unstoppable. In the Rugby World Cup quarter-finals in 1999, such was his menace, that France fullback Xavier Garbosjosa, just politely invited him through the defensive line allowing the 6ft 5in, 18st 10lbs behemoth crash over the line. Then there’s the infamous demolition of the England backline in 1995, when just 19, of which Tony Underwood and Mike Catt need no reminding. How about the hat-trick against Scotland in Dunedin, in 2000? We could go on…Savea: Some would suggest Savea is Lomu-lite, tipping the weighing scales tip at 16st 4lbs and 6ft 3in, but the Hurricane is also extremely powerful. When he dips his shoulder he has the strength to bounce opposition defenders on their backsides, as he did with Israel Dagg to brutal effect against the Crusaders in 2013, the Springboks Zane Kirchner, or more recently against three Pumas in New Zealand’s recent 23-10 victory over Argentina. Try to defend the Savea ‘bump’ at your perilSpeedLomu: Will Carling famously labelled Lomu a ‘freak’ after his four-try show in 1995, and for a man of such bulkk, it’s remarkable he was clocked at 10.7 sec 100m time. Lomu could ‘gas’ opponents as much as steamroller them and his first of two tries against France in the 1999 World Cup semi, and many of his Counties Manukau scores showed he had more than enough top-end pace for a wide-man.Savea: Savea is no slouch in the speed stakes. When he makes a break in the open-field he takes some catching, but he is not just a straight-line runner, either and possesses quick-feet that can spin him out of a tackle and into space. And just look at how he covers huge ground to make defensive tackles when caught on the drift.Break out: Julian Savea’s try-scoring record is sensationalFinishing Savea: Did you see that offload to TJ Perenara against Argentina in the 2014 Rugby Championship? Savea is an intelligent footballer who is still improving and his predatory nature is complimented by the fact he can flick, punt and run off the ball if he needs to.Who’s better: Jonah Lomu or Julian Savea?Jonah LomuJulian SaveaVoteView ResultsCrowdsignal.comWho's better: Jonah Lomu or Julian Savea? Julian Savea is already being talked about as one of the world’s best wings, at just 24, but can he really be compared to the great Jonah Lomu? TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Why it will be sizzling at the Singapore Sevens

first_img Fans-tastic: Fiji fans show their support at Singapore Sevens (Singapore Sports Hub Pte Ltd) Drum beat: Performers gear up for the Singapore Sevens (Rugby Singapore)If you are planning to Rock, Ruck and Rumble with the best of them, why not plan on arrive in Singapore a few days before 28 April and take advantage if the promotional offers at 170 establishments across the city? There are discounts and benefits covering a wide range of offerings – restaurants to retail outlets, entertainment hotspots and tourist attractions – all of which kick off from 1 March.What’s more, the off-pitch atmosphere around the stadium promenade promises to be just as electrifying as top local acts Jack & Rai, Jive Talkin’ and SambaMasala are confirmed as the lead music entertainment programme at the Stadium FunZone.Right notes: A music performer at the Singapore Sevens (Singapore Tourism Board)In the great tradition of sevens, fans don fancy dress and ‘show their colours’. And once the final whistle is blown, the Music After Sevens after-party kicks off in Singapore’s spectacular nightlife capital – Clarke Quay.HSBC Singapore Rugby Sevens won 2016’s International Sports Event of the Year at the Singapore Sports Awards. Kenya were surprise first-time winners of the tournament that year while the 2017 final was an all North American affair as Canada beat the United States 26-19 in a pulsating contest.Party time! Fans enjoy the post-tournament celebrations (Singapore Tourism Board)Considering a warm long weekend getaway with your loved ones? Look no further than Singapore late April! Visit http://www.singapore7s.sg/home/overseas-packages/ to learn more about travel packages to the Singapore Sevens. Singapore Sevens Advertising FeatureThe HSBC Singapore Rugby Sevens returns to the state-of-the-art National Stadium on 28-29 April bigger, better and bolder!In just two years, Singapore has fast become a fans’ and players’ favourite stop on the sevens circuit. Sports fans are guaranteed the edge-of-their-seat thrills of world-class rugby, with 16 of the best men’s sevens teams playing 45 matches for a coveted title in the HSBC World Rugby Seven Series calendar.Jump to it: New Zealand and South Africa in action at the Singapore Sevens (Singapore Sports Hub Pte Ltd)Yet the newest stop of the Sevens Series in Asia, the Lion City, does not only host another epic rugby joust. This is a spectacular sporting carnival that brings live music, family-friendly activities and international gourmet food all within a couple of minutes’ walk from your stadium seat.In addition to the epic on-pitch rugby action, the two-day extravaganza offers something for fans of every age, from bike races, gigantic Transformers and My Little Pony activations for the under-10s to revel in, or beer-gardens for older fans to chill in.Related: Let Singapore Surprise YouThis year, Singapore Sevens ticket holders get a bigger bang for their ticket too. The earlier you buy your ticket, the more offers you can enjoy over the eight-week Singapore Rugby Festival in the lead-up to the two-day extravaganza. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Living in Singapore? Then there is no excuse to miss the third edition of the HSBC Singapore Rugby Sevens! Buy your tickets at www.singapore7s.sgThis April, the world is coming to Singapore… are you? A look at what the 2018 Singapore Sevens has in store on and off the field on 28-29 Aprillast_img read more

Parish’s acolyte ministry includes those with special needs

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Nan RossPosted Feb 3, 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ February 3, 2012 at 2:58 pm This is awesome!!! This is what christianity is all about. Thank you Nan and Betsy! You have a wonderful ministry. Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Curt Zimmerman says: Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curt Zimmerman says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments (8) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis February 6, 2012 at 2:21 am PS. Those we identify as persons with special needs are really those with special gifts to others. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service W. Gaye Brown says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Johanna Fredrics says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC James Rawding says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA center_img February 8, 2012 at 10:36 am Makes my heart glad when I read this… what an example to so many other ParishesMany Blessings February 3, 2012 at 5:10 pm My parish, St. Stephen’s of Longmont, CO, has a young lady in a wheelchair who helps to usher. Our deacon, Dana Solomon, led the parish in a fundraising effort, and we built a ramp for wheelchairs so all are welcomed at the communion rail and we installed an electric handicap-accessible door into the building. We’ve also had a woman with limited use of her hands and who speaks through an electronic machine that she types into serve as a vestry member. St. Stephen’s has a long history of being welcoming and inclusive. February 4, 2012 at 12:22 pm A wonderful example of when the “way it should be” is actually “the way it is.” Thanks be to God for a parish that is so thoughtful. As an acolyte coordinator, I know how challenging it is to make potential acolytes feel comfortable and valued. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA St. Aidan’s acolyte team. Photo/James Pettit[Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta] Victor Catanzaro can’t see, and he can’t walk. And he doesn’t have a lot of strength in his upper body. But he can serve as an acolyte in an Episcopal church.How can this be? Well, it takes a parish.About three years ago, Betsy Jones, who serves as acolyte master at St. Aidan’s, Milton, approached Rector Rob Wood with a question. She already was used to the demanding role in which she supervises 65 acolytes who serve liturgically at the Alpharetta-area church on Cogburn Road. What’s one more challenge? “Do you think it would be possible for Victor to join the acolyte corps?” she asked Wood.Acolytes at St. Aidan’s usually spend their first year as serving as torch bearers, observing what the more experienced acolytes are asked to do: carry the cross, banners and alms basins, assist at the altar, and other tasks. Victor’s four sisters already were on the team.“Rob sat quietly, thinking it over,” recalled Jones. “Then he said, ‘Sure,’ and with a twinkle in his eye added, ‘But he can’t carry a torch!’”It was determined that Victor’s primary roles would be to carry the cross in procession and receive the alms basins at the offertory. The challenge was to come up with a method for attaching the cross to his wheelchair; after some intense web surfing, none was found. Then a parishioner came up with a plan to insert a holder for the bottom of the cross in the center of a piece of wood that would fit under the arms of Victor’s wheelchair. Another acolyte, who came to be known as “Victor’s buddy,” could push the wheelchair from behind with one hand and use the other hand to steady the cross.When Victor was on the rota to serve, members of the acolyte team took turns being his buddy. “But one Sunday, a relatively new acolyte named Patrick was serving with Victor and came up after the service to find out if he could be Victor’s buddy the next time he served. In fact, he said, he wanted to know if he could be Victor’s permanent buddy. ‘No problem,’ I said. ‘You’ve got the job!”Victor is not the only acolyte with special needs. St. Aidan’s expansive welcome extends to children who have been diagnosed with ADHD, there’s one on the Asperger’s spectrum and another with muscular dystrophy. “We make accommodations for all of them so they can fully participate,” Jones said.One Sunday recently when Victor and Patrick were serving, it was time for Victor to receive the sacraments. Patrick had been told that part of his job was to guide Victor’s hand to receive the bread. The chalice bearer would guide the cup to Victor’s lips. This time, however, the chalice bearer couldn’t reach over the altar. “So Patrick took the cup,” said Jones, “and without a second though gave it to Victor, saying softly, ‘The blood of Christ, the cup of salvation.”“Afterthat, there wasn’t a dry eye in the first three rows,” Jones said. “Like I said, we’ve got some really special kids in our acolyte ministry.”— Nan Ross is director of communication for the Diocese of Atlanta. This article first appeared in the Winter 2012 edition of Pathways Journal. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Parish’s acolyte ministry includes those with special needs Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS February 3, 2012 at 6:57 pm Great article. What an encouragement for the church to open wide its ministries to all who wish to serve! Thank you….and a big hello to Nan from NC! Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Robin Stark says: Lelanda Lee says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Leslie Scoopmire says: Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs February 6, 2012 at 2:19 am With all the challenges in the church, there are many times we catch a glimpse of of the gifts of the people. About 2002 we included a wonderfully happy young lady with Down’s Syndrome at Trinity, Wheaton, IL. When we caught the vision, we wondered why we hadn’t included her earlier. She handled crosses and torches with the greatest of care and the other acolytes were very protective of her. Her participation was a gift to all of us. February 3, 2012 at 7:28 pm Glad that I have a big monitor or all the people at work would see my tears right now:-) What a wonderful story. Thanks<3last_img read more

Archbishop of Kenya condemns attack on Nairobi parish

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Anglican Communion Africa, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Archbishop of Kenya condemns attack on Nairobi parish Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls By ACNS staffPosted Oct 1, 2012 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop Eliud Wabukala of the Anglican Church of Kenya has joined other religious leaders in condemning the explosive attack at St. Polycarp Parish on Juja Road in Nairobi Sept. 30.Earlier in the day, Wabukala and Bishop Joel Waweru of Nairobi diocese visited and prayed with four of the six children still admitted at Kenyatta National Hospital, Children’s Ward.In a statement released Oct. 1 at the scene of the explosion, Wabukala stated that Kenya is a multireligious society and termed the attacks as atrocities whose perpetrators should face the full rigor of the law. He called upon the government to offer adequate security since asking citizens to be vigilant is not sufficient. “This is a cruel provocation, but I appeal to Christians not to feed violence with violence, either in word or deed, because we are called to overcome evil with good,” he remarked.Nairobi Provincial Commissioner Njoroge Ndirangu and Supreme Council of Kenyan Muslims Secretary General Sheikh Adan Wachu gathered at the scene and expressed their disapproval of the of the heinous act.Waweru and Ndirangu later visited the bereaved family who lost a nine-year-old son, Ian Maina. Ian succumbed to injuries after the explosive device was hurled at their Sunday school class blowing the roof off. The assailants escaped on foot in a nearby path. Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

In Pennsylvania’s capital, a mission is reborn

first_img Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA May 8, 2013 at 6:35 am Dylan, the grants that are budgeted and will be made available through A073 have not yet been expended. The enterprise zones in this article seem to be a function of what the Diocese of Central PA is doing and envisioning within itself. Whether they apply for and / or are eligible for A073 Mission Enterprise Zone funding remains to be seen. A subcommittee of Executive Council’s JSP for Local Mission & Ministry is working with Tom Brackett now and at our June meeting of EC to draft the criteria and process for these grants. I hope this helps clear up some questions or confusion. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Rev. Harry L. Knisely says: Rector Bath, NC May 14, 2013 at 5:27 pm You need to take a break from the ENS website if rants like that one are how you’re going to act while on the executive council. Ted Babcock says: Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Sarah Dylan Breuer says: Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group May 15, 2013 at 3:38 pm St. Andrew Episcopal Church in Harrisburg, PA: One Parish, one Vestry, one Rector, two locations. The City location is not a Mission Church yet. While no one can deny that the “improvements” are needed, the Vestry of this parish has not been informed, consulted, or given the opportunity to approve any of the recent or planned activities of the Diocese. The Rev. Harry L. Knisely says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 May 5, 2013 at 12:12 pm St. Andrew’s in the City is working to develop and focus its mission using the Appreciative Inquiry process. Once they complete that process they will be able to create a parish profile for their search for a clergy leader.“The Extreme Make Over” will cost about $25,000 to replace old rugs, tiles and the cost of materials for the scraping sanding and repainting the first two floor of the church building . Most of the labor is being donated by the Harrisburg Convocation with help from other convocations. We are hoping for and expecting 80 or more on June 1st for the makeover. The mission also needs office equipment desks (2), chairs (6), computers (2), software and a printer, as all that equipment currently resides with the other half of the parish that the mission is being born from.Part of the money raised comes from the donations made by the Baptist and Mennonite Churches. The rest is being raised by the new mission itself. Finally, they are part of diocesan wide program to establish four “new ventures” so we as a diocese can learn what we need to do to help our church to thrive again. St. Andrew’s is the city mission of the diocese where we can learn how to go back into the city and re-establish the Episcopal Church’s presence. We have a “new venture” in Potter County, a rural area in the northern tier, that is now almost a year old and thriving. Another “new venture” is in State College, PA and is an effort to learn how to better bring university students and professors into the church. The fourth venture is located along on the Maryland border and it is a mission already, but it is in need to strong support to move to a parish statues (independence) within the next 3-5 years. We are committed to helping them achieve parish status while we learn from that experience – successes as well as our frustrations.As a diocese we want to learn how to thrive and are committed to finding ways to spread the Gospel and bring others to Christ. We are committed to becoming a “learning diocese” that is not afraid of mistakes or failures as they are opportunities to learn from.Hope this brief outline helps you and others understand what we are trying to do as a diocese.Blessings,Ted Babcock Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Diocese of Central Pennsylvania] Sometime this summer, St. Andrew’s in the City will become the Diocese of Central Pennsylvania’s newest mission.Founded as a mission more than a hundred years ago St. Andrew’s in the City rapidly grew into a parish in the thriving area of Allison Hill in Harrisburg. With movement out of the city during the post-World War II period, St. Andrew’s in the City established a mission church in the Linglestown area of Harrisburg – St. Andrew’s in the Valley.With the rapid movement of residents out of the city and the economic decline of Harrisburg due to the loss of industry, the demographic of the city changed. Over time, the economic vitality of the city shifted to the more suburban valley. The parish continued to operate as one with one vestry and one rector, but the city church faced increasing challenges as the neighborhood of Allison Hill changed and the parish got older.St. Andrew’s in the City still provided the endowments to pay off the Valley church’s mortgage and gave significant operating funds to the valley church. But a move grew to collapse the city church into being just the valley church.Bishop Nathan Baxter, a son of the city of Harrisburg, sent his staff in to see what the city church wanted to do. The staff met with a congregation that had lost hope and felt bad about itself. Members had been told they were a burden on the valley and needed to close, and they were afraid of losing their church.Through a process of Appreciative Inquiry, the congregants explored their history, mission and new ways of being church. They invited a Baptist church to use their facilities, which generated income as well as making a statement to the community. Later a Mennonite church began using the facility, too.“Now we are heeding God’s call and re-establishing our church with a new mission to the community,” said Troy Thompson, a lifetime member of St. Andrew’s. “St. Andrew’s has been touched by the Spirit, and our energy and fire have to be replenished to spread God’s word.”St. Andrew’s in the City is now one of four “enterprise zones” being redeveloped by the diocese. The idea is to assist churches identified as ones where growth might be obtained by thoughtful investment. In the process, the diocese will become a “learning diocese” as it studies each zone and learns from its efforts.“We expect mistakes. We expect successes,” said the Rev. Ted Babcock, canon to the ordinary. “Each new enterprise zone provides the diocese valuable information on how to go about strengthening our presence in Central Pennsylvania and the city is one of four now redeveloping their ministry.”At St. Andrew’s, he said, “The Spirit has manifested itself in a call to plan and execute a radical makeover of the parish building. The old is coming out, and the new is coming in.”The process began April 13 with “D-Day,” or Dumpster Day, when members asked two parishes and the other mission church of the diocese to come and help them clean out the city facilities in preparation of an “extreme makeover” to begin on June 1.More than 30 people came to help. In less than three hours, they cleaned the entire church and former rectory of years of debris and other “stored” items that had built up. The cleanup filled a large dumpster, and some of the more valuable items were contributed to the Valley for its own tag sale.On June 1, more than 80 people from throughout the diocese are expected to help with the makeover. The first two floors of the church building will be painted. Old wiring will be replaced and the plumbing repaired. Afterward, new carpeting and a new tile floor will be laid. So far, St. Andrew’s has raised more than $50,000 to begin the makeover.The church’s neighbors are taking notice of the revitalization. One Dumpster Day, onlooker Sonja, a Hispanic pastor who lives next door to St. Andrews in the City, said, “This restoration is bringing the church back to life in the community.“I wonder if there is room for our Hispanic neighbors to do Bible study?”— Linda Arguedas is canon for events, programs and communications in the Episcopal Diocese of Central Pennsylvania. Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Dorothy Kapnic says: By Linda ArguedasPosted Apr 26, 2013 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York May 20, 2013 at 10:20 pm I would agree Cathy, and I can only wonder when the Vestry became 10 members allowed from the Valley Congregation and only 2 from the Allyson Hill Congregation? Historically, there is only one corporation, and that is a legal canonical process if it is to change. It might be different today if we had left set representation at six for each altar’s congregation. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Sarah Dylan Breuer says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR May 8, 2013 at 4:31 am Thank you for responding, Ted.I did not gather from your response, though the diocese’s missionary desires are strong, how St Andrews in the City will meet the criteria for “Mission Enterprise Zones” in GC2012 A073, particularly:“Resolved, That Diocesan Standing Committees and Bishops partner to create “Mission Enterprise Zones,” defined as a geographic area, as a group of congregations or as an entire diocese committed to mission and evangelism that engages under-represented groups, including youth and young adults, people of color, poor and working-class people, people with a high-school diploma or less, and/or people with little or no church background or involvement.”The ENS article represents St. Andrew’s in the *City* (not just the diocese as a whole or its rural activities) as being a “Mission Enterprise Zone” — and not just one of them, but a public exemplar of how Mission Enterprise Zones are being implemented.As a member of Executive Council, I am particularly interested in how Please explain at your earliest convenience how St. Andrew’s in the City is implementing GC 2012 A073. I’d love to hear as well how the other three “Mission Enterprise Zones” met the criteria for funding under A073.I am particularly concerned about the ambiguity of the process as you’ve described it given that General Convention specified in particular that “each Mission Enterprise Zone feature a strategic plan to start or redevelop a congregation that is intentionally multi-cultural, incorporating the presence and leadership of under-represented generations, socio-economic groups, races, ethnicities and/or languages,” among other criteria.It sounds like the “Mission Enterprise Zone” in question has no strategic plan at all at present, but is undergoing a process of Appreciative Inquiry to hire a cleric who might develop one.Given the lack of any specific plan (and if there is one that isn’t publicly disclosed, please do feel free to contact me personally any time, day or night) for an Episcopalian congregation to do anything in particular at St. Andrew’s in the City other than hire a cleric, how has the congregation decided that whatever it’s doing next requires 2 (and only 2) desks and 6 (and only six) chairs are needed?It seems to me that whether any desks and what kind and number of chairs are needed for the office would be the function of what was going to happen in the facility. And so far the plan is to remake the facilities — deciding whether and where carpeting is needed, and so on — based on no plan at all.This is a matter of serious concern to me as a member of Executive Council. I would be asking these questions privately had ENS not raised this mission as a model (and perhaps the first one — I haven’t noticed any prior ENS articles on this subject, though I might have missed some) of what GC 2012 A073 “Mission Enterprise Zones” are funding.I look forward very much to hearing what the plan is to ensure that A073 funding is going toward the purposes for which the resolution allocated them.I admit also some disappointment that, given our GC-adopted mission emphasis on horizontal networking, that the diocesan plan for MEZs seems to start with furniture and buildings, continue with clergy, and stop after one cleric is hired. I look forward eagerly to ENS reporting about the communities MEZs will reach — who’s there, what THEY care about (I’m guessing that unchurched people don’t have a solid idea about how many desks they want in the office of the church that doesn’t exist yet), and how A073 funds are helping Episcopalians engage their real, local communities where and with respect to what they care about.GC 2012 Resolution A073 was not, I think, passed because GC felt that dioceses needed more desks and chairs. I think it was passed because bishops and deputies alike wanted to fund new ideas and initiatives, and in particular to engage communities that are (to our shame) new to TEC.I will be asking my colleagues on the appropriate committee as well as Council as a whole to keep an eye on what’s happening. I expect it to be inspiring and innovative, as I’m sure your diocese’s plans for A073 funding will be.Thank you for speaking up, and I look forward to ongoing conversation.Blessings,Dylan Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK May 16, 2013 at 2:44 pm I am the Sunday priest who has worked with this congregation off and on since 2005, and during 2007 & 2008 was the Interim Pastor, and Since 2011 have been the associate priest of Saint Andrew’s Church, Harrisburg. I assure the parties who seem to be willing to discuss this subject on line, to accept an invitation to attend a service and meet the people. We gather every Sunday at 8 am and promise you will be welcomed and are welcome. This congregation at the moment has had eighteen months of leadership by the Diocesan Staff, and as of this time, the people, who are diverse in age and race, are working, all of them, and have for months to affect this process. Unlike few things I have witnessed as an Episcopal Priest of forty-four years, they are one hundred percent involved and active in this process and work. If you cannot make a Sunday service and at least see us face to face, how about attending our Bible Study on Wednesday evenings at 7 – 8 pm. We are currently studying Ephesians. I only hope the National Church is capable of doing its work and doing it as well. Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Comments (13) In Pennsylvania’s capital, a mission is reborn Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ May 18, 2013 at 10:08 pm Yes, of course there is, and most importantly, the energy level of this congregation to do so is truly remarkable. I refer to them as the 100 % group. There will be in place a strategic plan and the intent to continue to develop that plan in the coming years. As I have said before, if you do not think we intend to do this, just come by the building at 1854 Market Street, worship with us and learn how we reach out and welcome the people around us. There is some updating of the physical properties, but more importantly they are putting in place the spiritual disciplines to grow and thrive at the corner of 19th and Market Street in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. It is gratifying that I write this on the eve of Pentecost, and I want to add, that their great energy for this work is the evidence of the reality of how the Spirit is moving in our midst. This is a wonderful people, and there is nothing they cannot do.Inviting all interested persons for an on site visit.Come Holy Spirit Come!The Rev. Harry L. Knisely+ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC May 10, 2013 at 9:21 am Thanks, Anne. That helps a lot. I see not that the article just says it’s an “enterprise zone,” not that it’s a “Mission Enterprise Zone.” This is one reason I like such discussions — folks like you and Ted are generous enough to answer questions and correct mistaken impressions! Blessings to you both, and to the congregation. Rector Washington, DC The Rev. Harry L. Knisely says: Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing July 31, 2013 at 11:10 am This will be literally my last word and comment about this news item, concerning a new mission in Harrisburg, and the date of the news release was April 26, 2013. First, since I served Saint Andrew Church as its Interim Priest in 2008, it has always been a presumed division of the vestry of 2 from the City, and 10 from Linglestown. I have not attempted to understand how that came to be, but clearly, I believe I could suggest that it is neither canonical nor sound. Second, I have carefully studied and factored the attendance of the City congregation and it is clearly not 12 or about 12. Which is used by Dorothy Kapnic to justify and 1/7 & and 2/14 split.In fact the last three years the attendance has been averaged at 20.0 in 2012, 21.1 in 2011, and 18.3 in 2010. If the attendance for the Linglestown congregation is indeed on average 85, if one were to attempt a split membership for vestry representation it should be 3/12. But I do not believe the split of the corporation board (the Vestry) is either proper or valid. Third, as many people know from the current discussions, this is at times used for some to be a way to split the financial figures for any separation of the two altars or the congregation. If one considers that there literally was no congregation in Linglestown before 1980 and no building before 1986, the part of the congregation that gathers around that altar would not exist with a generous generation of church planters a generation ago. Finally, it has been interesting and at times frustrating to listen to the conversation about so much that is at stake in this work. For me the bottom line is this. Literally the physical, spiritual and emotional energy in the new mission work at the city site is of 100% of the congregation. It has been remarkable to witness this focus and hard work. I congratulate them and wish them well. God speed dear friends. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA April 29, 2013 at 8:19 pm I just want to have a clear idea of this.The reborn mission of St. Andrews in the City is currently and commendably lending space to Baptist and Mennonite congregations, and has led one pastor of an existing Hispanic congregation who lives next door to wonder whether she might also be allowed to use the premises for bible study.All this is very good.In terms of future action proposed for St. Andrews in the City, I understand from this article that an “extreme makeover” costing about $50,000 is planned to make the physical plant more broadly useful.Sounds like good stewardship of the property.Is there other missionary and/or other congregational activity proposed as part of the rebirth of St. Andrews in the City as a “Mission Enterprise Zone”?Many thanks, and blessings! Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC June 6, 2013 at 11:09 am The Vestry has never “become” any set proportion. Any member in good standing is eligible to run for vestry. Since the City location has an average Sunday attendance of about 12 and the Valley congregation has an average Sunday attendance of around 85, it not logical to suggest 1/2 and 1/2, but rather 1/7 city and 6/7 valley. During my term on Vestry (mid 2007 – mid 2010), elections were usually with a slate of exactly the number of vestry members needed so as to ensure that the city church WAS represented on the Vestry. (Finding members who are both qualified and willing to serve is always a challenge.) By the way, Fr. Knisely was the interim for a total of 14 months, Dec 2007 thru Jan 2009. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Rev. Harry L. Knisely says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI July 9, 2013 at 5:29 pm In May we started a Wednesday night Bible Study, which will resume in August after taking the month of July off. It has been well attended and others from the Harrisburg have enquired about the study and one has joined us on a regular basis. We are studying Ephesians, which is an excellent presentation of the ministry of a congregation. Actually, I was the Interim from September 2007 until December 2008. By this time our Bishop, Nathan D. Baxter, has interceded with the congregation. It is important that we follow both Diocesan and Natonal Canon Laws about the incorporation of congregations. Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel John Standard says: Comments are closed. CATHY KALASKY says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL The Rev. Harry L. Knisely says: Sarah Dylan Breuer says: Anne M Watkins says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA last_img read more

Oklahoma: Testimonio mundial de apoyo y un largo trecho para…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Por Pat McCaughanPosted May 24, 2013 Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Una mujer camina en medio de los escombros después que un gigantesco tornado azotara a Moore, Oklahoma, el 20 de mayo de 2013. El inmenso tornado, que arrasó con este suburbio de Oklahoma City, causó por lo menos 24 víctimas mortales cuando vientos de hasta 320 kilómetros por hora barrieron hileras de casas, dos escuelas y un hospital, dejando una estela de enmarañadas ruinas. Foto de Richard Rowe/Reuters.[Episcopal News Service] Miembros de la Iglesia Episcopal y personas de todas partes del mundo ofrecieron sus oraciones y brindaron su apoyo, el 21 de mayo, a las víctimas de un gigantesco tornado que el día anterior había dejado  centenares de heridos y docenas de muertos, entre ellos 9 niños, en Oklahoma.“Ésta es la primera jornada completa desde el tornado y aún hay muchas cosas cambiantes, la información todavía es muy fluida. Lo fundamental es cerciorarse de lo que podemos hacer y ofrecer apoyo y recursos a aquellos que los necesitan”, dijo el Rdo. José McLoughlin, canónigo del Ordinario para la Diócesis Episcopal de Oklahoma, que se olvidó de que era su cumpleaños hasta que alguien se lo recordó.“Imagínese a alguien que viva en un barrio, en una comunidad, y que todo eso desaparezca, que vea nada más que escombros donde antes había un vecindario, y casas y donde los niños jugaban”, dijo durante una entrevista telefónica con ENS el 21 de mayo.“Resultaba difícil concentrarse realmente o pensar en un cumpleaños con tantas pérdidas y tantas personas necesitadas, e imaginando todas las cosas que deben hacerse”.El había pasado la mayor parte del día entre dos extremos: lidiando [por una parte] con la pavorosa inmensidad de la destrucción y [por la otra, atendiendo] las desbordantes muestras de cariño y ofertas de apoyo de todas partes del mundo.“Ha sido extraordinario. Durante las últimas 24 horas en particular, ha resultado abrumadora la cantidad de comunicaciones que hemos recibido —a través de correos electrónicos, mensajes de texto y llamadas telefónicas— de personas dispuestas a hacer cualquier cosa en cualquier momento.“La Iglesia se ha portado estupendamente, desde la Obispa Primada dirigiéndose al obispo Ed Konieczny  y el personal de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales (ERD, por su sigla en inglés), hasta los curas párrocos — ha sido sencillamente asombroso, las genuinas muestras de preocupación y las genuinas ofertas de ayuda”.[Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales ha abierto una página de recursos para socorro en casos de tornado aquí]McLoughlin dijo que él y otros miembros del personal diocesano habían recibido expresiones de interés desde sitios tan remotos como “Japón, Alemania y Dubái… [y de] personas de todas partes de la Comunión Anglicana” y de todos los niveles de la Iglesia.“Es increíble la manera en que se han volcado hacia nosotros. Clérigos de todo el país se han acercado para preguntar lo que pueden hacer, y han dicho que nos llevan en sus oraciones.Ahora mismo, la diócesis se encuentra en gran medida en plan de evaluación y contemplando una recuperación a corto plazo, añadió.“Hemos estado catalogando a todas las personas que han llamado, lo que ofrecen y lo que pueden hacer, así como estamos catalogando las necesidades de parroquias y sacerdotes para estar seguros de que podemos estar preparados según vayan pasando los días, porque el verdadero reto se va a presentar cuando la prensa se vaya y el trabajo continúe, y para cerciorarnos de quién está en disposición de ayudarnos”.Según van surgiendo las historias de heroísmo y servicio, él encomiaba la resistencia de los oklahomenses, muchos de los cuales están empezando a pasar del momento del shock y del rescate al de la recuperación y la ayuda mutua.Los clérigos locales todavía están intentando contactar a sus feligreses y dey de comprobar la situación de todos sus miembros. La diócesis ofreció ayuda inmediata a los que tenían necesidad de alojamiento, comida, ropa, artículos de uso personal y otras cosas esenciales, dijo él.La Cruz Roja Americana y otros de los primeros en acudir al lugar del desastre, aún impiden el acceso de las personas a algunas áreas, “de manera que sospecho que en los próximos días, una vez que ellos hayan terminado la labor de rescate y comience la limpieza, conseguiremos a algunas personas que nos ayuden en el empeño de limpiar [los escombros]”, añadió.La escuela de Santa María [St. Mary’s School], en Edmond, ha comenzado esfuerzos coordinados para recoger agua y otros artículos accesorios, tales como juguetes o peluches, pero las agencias locales han dicho que la necesidad inmediata es de ayuda económica, dijo el 21 de mayo el Rdo. Bob Story, rector de la iglesia de Santa María.“Nos hemos puesto en contacto con dos agencias diferentes [y] el banco de alimentos regional y nos dicen que lo que necesitan es dinero”, dijo Story, que se enteró de dos familias desplazadas por el tornado. “No tienen necesidad de otras cosas ahora, lo cual crea un problema de almacenamiento”.Y, si bien al presente hay mucha gente que quiere “hacer algo más que librar un cheque”, “el banco de alimentos regional en Oklahoma City se encuentra ahora mismo tan bien coordinado que tienen un conocimiento preciso de lo que necesitan para cubrir esa necesidad, simplemente necesitan dinero porque eso les da más flexibilidad”, afirmó.“Como personas de fe, podemos hacer varias cosas, la más importante de las cuales es ofrecer nuestras oraciones a Dios y apoyar a esas agencias que brindan ayuda en los [momentos de] desastre, según un comunicado de la Iglesia.“Todas las donaciones deben enviarse a Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales [Episcopal Relief & Development] para la labor que lleva a cabo, en nuestro nombre, de apoyo a las víctimas”, según dice el comunicado.Irónicamente, McLoughlin se dirigía al aeropuerto el día que azotó el llamado tornado “monstruo” (20 de mayo) para asistir a una sesión de entrenamiento y preparación para desastres que Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales tenía programada en San Luis.Al pensar en las tormentas y tornados del 19 de mayo que afectaron algunas áreas suburbanas de Oklahoma City, y al escuchar los informes meteorológicos en la radio, “tuve el pálpito de lo que estaba por ocurrir”, recuerda él.“Algo no parecía andar bien. Llegué al aeropuerto y nunca salí de mi auto”, contó. “Regresé a la oficina y nunca me fui, y luego se produjo el tornado”.Anoche, al final de una jornada muy larga dedicada a responder a problemas inmediatos, tales como evaluaciones de propiedades, ayuda [para reclamaciones] de seguros, catalogación de recursos y ofertas y la creación de una infraestructura económica para recibir las donaciones, McLoughlin cambió su centro de atención.“Pasé la velada con mi familia” al cumplir 44 años, dijo. “La ironía es que, mientras estoy sentado aquí en mi casa (en Edmond) y hace una hermosa tarde soleada, sé cuanto daño y cuanta devastación han ocurrido apenas a 40 minutos en auto de aquí”, agregó.“Para algunas personas, para muchísimas personas, el sol no ha comenzado a brillar todavía. Es muy doloroso”.Una vez que el foco de la prensa se vaya, él espera que el apoyo y la ayuda continuarán durante lo que promete ser un extenso período de recuperación.“Resulta claro que va a ser un proceso largo. Sólo la extensión del daño, el número de casas destruidas, los negocios, las escuelas —tres escuelas recibieron el impacto [del tornado], y una fue completamente demolida. Sólo considerar la cantidad de tiempo que se necesita para reconstruir barriadas que han desaparecido completamente, el tiempo que se necesita para levantar nuevamente esa infraestructura… Hay un largo trecho por delante para que la gente tome la decisión de si va a reconstruir.“Pero”, añadió él. “Los oklahomenses tienen una gran resistencia, han atravesado antes por la tragedia. Son personas recias que se juntan y se ayudan mutuamente. Somos afortunados de contar con personas comprometidas a hacer lo que sea necesario”.– La Rda. Pat McCaughan es una corresponsal de Episcopal News Service radicada en Los Ángeles. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Oklahoma: Testimonio mundial de apoyo y un largo trecho para la recuperación Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

Minnesota: Six Hmong people among 33 to be ordained

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Posted Jun 12, 2015 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA June 16, 2015 at 7:40 pm This is exciting news indeed! Thanks be to God!!! The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events June 17, 2015 at 10:46 pm 40 years is a long time to wait. I rejoice with all involved. Thanks be to God! Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service The Rev. Lucretia Jevne says: Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Rev. Dr. Fran Toy says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments (2) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Minnesota: Six Hmong people among 33 to be ordained Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA [The Episcopal Church in Minnesota] The Rt. Rev. Brian Prior, IX Bishop of the Episcopal Church in Minnesota, will ordain 33 people on Saturday, June 20. Of these 33, six are Hmong members of Holy Apostles, the first Hmong-majority faith community within the Episcopal Church.Two of the six are being ordained as vocational deacons, while the other four will be ordained as transitional deacons. God willing and the people consenting, the four transitional deacons will be ordained as priests next year.Thomas Thao, one of the four being ordained as a transitional deacon, is very excited about this opportunity, especially knowing that he’ll be a positive role model for others in his community.“This is very meaningful to me because I’ll be able to share my gifts and talents with others,” said Thao.He added, “This opportunity leads me on a new journey and will allow me to continue growing my faith while sharing my experiences with others.”The six ordinands include three women and three men; Bao Moua will be the first Hmong woman to pursue the priesthood.“The most exciting thing about June 20, 2015, is that for over 40 years of the Hmong people being in the U.S., the Episcopal Church will be ordaining its first Hmong majority Shared Ministry Team, three of whom are women,” said Moua.“This is history in the making, and with God’s help we have only begun our mission,” she added.In addition to the six Hmong being ordained, one Anglo from Holy Apostles will be ordained as a vocational deacon. The seven ordinands from Holy Apostles, in addition to seven others who will be commissioned for lay ministries in December, will make up Holy Apostles’ Shared Ministry Team. They will be leading worship, pastoral care, mission and evangelism, and Christian formation; they will also collaborate with the Bishop’s Committee.The Shared Ministry Team has been in formation for three years. Instructors have been drawn from local seminaries in addition to clergy, lay instructors, and missioners from the Episcopal Church. All instruction has been interpreted from English to Hmong to make the program accessible to team members who are not fluent in English.The team will be working with the support and collaboration of The Rev. Letha Wilson-Barnard, Holy Apostles’ Vicar and Mentor to the Team, and The Rev. Toua Vang, Associate Priest of Holy Apostles and Hmong/Southeast Asian Missioner of Episcopal Asiamerica Ministries (EAM).The Bishop’s Committee and Shared Ministry Team have already begun meeting regularly to develop the mission and vision for Holy Apostles. This Shared Ministry Team provides new opportunities for ministry, mission, and evangelism to the Hmong community in Minnesota, the United States, and the world. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID People Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Resumen informativo de la 78ª. Convención General, 30 de junio

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Resumen informativo de la 78ª. Convención General, 30 de junio An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] Muchas cosas suceden cada día durante la Convención General. Además de cualquier otra cobertura de Episcopal News Service, he aquí algunos asuntos noticiosos adicionales del 28 al 30 de junio:Ashley Bingaman, ex misionera del Cuerpo de Servicio de Jóvenes Adultos, que ejerció como maestra de música en la escuela de la Santa Trinidad de 2012 a 2014, conversa con el Rdo. David Copley, el funcionario de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera encargado de la misión. Un fragmento del mural “La Última Cena” se ve en primer plano. Foto de Tracy J. Sukraw/ENS.Un mural sobreviviente del terremoto simboliza la esperanzaEl 30 de junio los visitantes del quiosco de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera en el salón de exhibiciones tuvieron la oportunidad de ver un fragmento de “La Última Cena”, uno de los tres murales supervivientes de la catedral de la Santa Trinidad en Haití destruida por el terremoto de enero de 2010.“La Última Cena” obra de Philomé Obin es uno de los 14 murales de tamaño natural pintados originalmente en los muros interiores de la Santa Trinidad por artistas haitianos. En su totalidad, el cuadro muestra a un Jesús blanco rodeado de discípulos de todos los colores, con colinas haitianas visibles a través de una puerta abierta detrás de ellos.El misionero Rdo. David Copley dijo que los murales los pintaron entre los años 40 y los años 60 [del pasado siglo] y fueron algo controversiales al principio. “Mostraban a haitianos en los relatos del Nuevo Testamento, y creo que eso era bastante raro en esa época”, comentó.Dijo que él se había sentido conmovido por las historias de los visitantes, tanto por lo que les dice a ellos el fragmento del mural como por lo que la catedral puede significar para la gente.“En este caso no es sólo un lugar de culto, sino un símbolo de esperanza, para la Iglesia Episcopal y para el pueblo de Haití”, dijo Copley.Luego del terremoto, un equipo de conservadores bajo el auspicio del Proyecto de Recuperación Cultural de Haití de la Institución Smithsonian, removió los murales supervivientes para preservarlos. Los han de reinstalar una vez que reconstruyan la catedral.La Diócesis de Haití es la más grande [en número de fieles] de la Iglesia Episcopal. Reconstruir la catedral y recaudar los fondos para llevar a cabo esa obra, es una importante prioridad de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera (DFMS), según se anuncia en el salón de exhibiciones.Red denominacional para plantar iglesiasLa Convención General apoyó la creación de una red denominacional para la plantación de congregaciones, y la captación y adiestramiento de los plantadores el 30 de junio cuando la Cámara de Obispos aprobó la Resolución D005 por unanimidad y con un entusiasta aplauso.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori dijo que la cámara normalmente no alienta el aplauso, “pero no puedo imaginar que hubiera nadie en esta Iglesia que se opusiera a éste”.Todos los obispos que hicieron uso de la palabra hablaron a favor de la resolución.El obispo Prince Singh, de Rochester, dijo que a él “lo anima esta resolución. Siento que tiene dientes y fuerza para sacarnos adelante. Advierto que mencionan a congregaciones latinas e hispanas. Espero que tengamos en mente que hay grupos de migrantes que están llegando a EE.UU. y vemos el potencial allí de una vitalidad y crecimiento auténticos en la Iglesia”.La obispa Diane Bruce, sufragánea de Los Ángeles, dijo que apoyaba la resolución con “eufórico júbilo. Hemos sido destinatarios de una de las subvenciones de Zonas de Empresas de Misión y ha sido como una asombrosa inyección de energía… especialmente para congregaciones multiculturales y multilingües que son tan necesarias en nuestra Iglesia ahora mismo”.En 2012, la Convención General asignó $2 millones para ayudar a las diócesis a establecer Zonas de Empresas de Misión y para apoyar el comienzo de nuevas iglesias como parte del compromiso de la Iglesia Episcopal con la primera de las Cinco Marcas de la Misión de la Comunión Anglicana: proclamar las buenas nuevas del reino.Si bien la Resolución D005 pedía un aumento de su financiación trienal de $2 millones a $5 millones para el trienio 2016-2018, la Convención General no ha aprobado aún ese presupuesto del trienio y por tanto el monto exacto de la financiación no se conoce aún. El presupuesto se presentará en una sesión conjunta de la Cámara de Obispos y de la Cámara de Diputados en la tarde del 1 de julio.Una serie de artículos de ENS acerca de las Zonas de Empresa de Misión se puede encontrar aquí.Sobrantes de exhibición van a una tienda de segunda manoCuando la fabricante de vestimentas Colleen Hintz llegó para abrir el quiosco de Fruit of the Vine en el Salón de Exhibiciones de la Convención General, hizo un alto en Target para comprar una mesa y unas sillas para su caseta. Dijo que se sentía entusiasmada de descubrir que, cuando el salón cierre, ella puede donarlas a Nuestra Tienda [Our Store], una establecimiento local de artículos de segunda mano que ayuda al ministerio del SIDA en Utah. “En lugar de ponerlas en un contenedor en alguna parte, encontrarán un buen uso”.Agregó que se sentía particularmente complacida de que su donación ayudara a personas con SIDA porque su parroquia, la iglesia del Redentor [Church of the Redeemer] en Morristown, Nueva Jersey, apoya la Eric Johnson House, un programa de vivienda transitoria para personas con SIDA localizado en la antigua rectoría de la iglesia.Los exhibidores pueden donar muebles y otros artículos para la tienda de segunda mano en el quiosco de la Diócesis de Utah una vez que el salón cierre a las 4:00 P.M. del 1 de julio, dijo Vicki Evans, coordinadora de los quioscos. “Los encargados de mudanzas de la Diócesis de Utah se los llevan y los entregan”.Es una solución útil para muchos exhibidores que prefieren comprar muebles y otros objetos para sus quioscos, en lugar de alquilarlos, dijo ella. “Alquilar cosas para un quiosco de exhibición aquí es sencillamente muy caro, y la mayoría de nosotros somos [empresas] sin fines de lucro.Joseph Peters-Mathews, encargado de comunicaciones de la Diócesis de California, lleva una bufanda púrpura para mostrar su apoyo a que más mujeres lleguen a ser obispas. Foto de Sharon Sheridan/ENS.Asistentes usan bufandas púrpuras para apoyar el que haya más obispasEl siempre abigarrado conjunto de la Convención General mostraba más púrpura de lo habitual ya que algunos participantes llevaban bufandas de ese color para mostrar su respaldo a un aumento del número de mujeres en el episcopado.“Las bufandas púrpuras aparecieron en Breaking the Episcopal Glass Ceiling, [Romper el Techo de Vidrio Episcopal] una nueva organización de Facebook”, dijo la presidenta del Caucus de Mujeres Episcopales, Rda. Terri Pilarski. La intención es recordarle a la gente las ordenaciones de mujeres, “en particular intentar elevar a mujeres a desempeñarse como obispas”, apuntó.No sólo hay pocas obispas, sino que muy pocas mujeres parecen dispuestas a entrar en el proceso de elección de obispos, señaló ella. “Estamos intentando encontrar formas de apoyar a las mujeres para que entren en ese proceso” y también apoyarlas después si no resultan electas.Algunas mujeres que han pasado por eso “han encontrado que el proceso es realmente brutal y sexista y doloroso”, dijo. “Siempre resulta duro no ganar, pero no debe ser debilitante”.“Si podemos lograr que haya hombres que lleven bufandas púrpuras y que haya hombres que apoyen el proceso… tendremos un cambio de paradigma en la conciencia [que queremos crear] y eso realmente ayudará”, añadió.Entre los hombres que llevaban bufandas púrpuras el 28 de junio estaba Joseph Peters-Mathews, encargado de comunicaciones de la Diócesis de California. La canóniga del Ordinario de esa diócesis, Rda. Stefani Schatz, se cuenta entre las organizadoras de la campaña de la bufanda púrpura y está publicando un álbum en Facebook con las fotos de los que se han puesto las bufandas.Demografía de los diputados: abundan los Johnson y los diputados son más jóvenesLa Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, anunció el 29 de junio que el apellido más común de los diputados era Johnson y dijo que los datos demográficos de los diputados están cambiando. El diputado más viejo tiene 90 años y el más joven 17, y hay muchos más diputados menores de 30 años que en cualquier otra Convención General, noticia que fue recibida con aplausos. Los hombres sobrepasan ligeramente a las mujeres por un margen de 51 a 49 por ciento. Jennings también brindó un desglose de la demografía racial y étnica de los diputados:77 por ciento son caucásicos;9 por ciento son negros, afroamericanos o africanos.7 por ciento son hispanos o latinos;3 por ciento son indígenas, nativoamericanos o isleños de las Islas del Pacífico;3 por ciento son asiáticos; ymenos de un 1 por ciento son mestizos o de raza no especificada.Según Jennings: “Hay un aumento en el número de diputados de color, pero la presidencia también reconocería que hay lugar para que eso mejore.Los diputados aprueban la C048, que pide aumentar el salario mínimo a $15El 29 de junio los diputados aprobaron una resolución que sigue apoyando la promoción y políticas de convenciones anteriores a favor de proporcionar un salario digno, y que abogan por un aumento del salario mínimo a $15 la hora.La diputada Sarah Lawton, de California, coordinadora de desarrollo de la Universidad de California en el Centro Laboral de Berkeley, habló en apoyo de la Resolución C048. Dijo a la asamblea que aumentar el salario mínimo no conduce a la pérdida de empleos, sino que más bien estimula la economía y la productividad. Ella dijo que la pregunta moral es: “¿En este abismo que media entre los que están bien y los que están realmente luchando por sobrevivir, ¿dónde ha de situarse la Iglesia?”.El diputado David Sevign, de la Diócesis de Lexington, se opuso porque [la resolución] “no aborda nuestra propia mayordomía. Supongo que muchas de las estructuras de la Iglesia tienen empleados a los que les pagan mucho menos de $15 por hora. De manera que, por favor, por favor, no podemos señalar la paja en el ojo de nuestro gobierno mientras no nos saquemos la viga del nuestro”.La Presencia Oficial de la Juventud adquiere una nueva perspectiva en la IglesiaSydney Norman, de 17 años, a la izquierda, y Maddy Gonzales, de 16, son parte de la Presencia Oficial de la Juventud en la Convención General 2015. Ellas y el resto del grupo de 18 miembros se reunió recientemente con la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, para almorzar y aprender más acerca del funcionamiento de la Convención General. Foto de Sharon Sheridan/ENS.Los 18 miembros de la Presencia Oficial de la Juventud se reunieron con la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, para compartir un almuerzo con pizzas el 28 de junio como parte de su petición de aprender y participar en la Convención General.Los miembros —dos de cada provincia— tienen asiento y voz en la Cámara de Diputados y pueden participar en audiencias de comités y en debates del pleno.“Aportan energía. Aportan sus propias perspectivas singulares” a la Convención, dijo Jennings a ENS. “Estoy muy agradecida por su presencia y por todo lo que aportan a la Cámara.El programa, dijo ella, “crea en verdad la capacidad de liderazgo y la formación de esta manera particular en la vida de la Iglesia.El parlamentario de los diputados, Brian Krislock, fue miembro de la Presencia de la Juventud en la Convención General de 2000 en Denver. “Es una experiencia increíble para una persona joven”, dijo él. “La seriedad con la que lo toman es impresionante”.Cuando él participó, “no era sencillamente un viaje divertido de dos semanas. Era una participación muy concienzuda en la vida de la Iglesia”.Maddy Gonzales, de 16 años, de la Diócesis de Olympia, solicitó convertirse en miembro de la presencia de la juventud de esta Convención luego de asistir como delegada a una convención diocesana, lo cual, según ella, era inusual para una persona joven de su diócesis. “Quería ver la Iglesia en un ámbito más amplio y experimentar eso”, señaló.Las cosas más grandes que ha obtenido de su participación Sydney Norman, de 17 años, de Minnesota: “He aprendido la importancia de la fe en mi vida y lo importante que es para mí continuar eso”.Aprobada la resolución sobre la Iniciativa de la Evangelización DigitalLos diputados aprobaron la Resolución B009 el 29 de junio, la cual instruye al personal de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera a crear y aplicar una iniciativa de evangelización digital… “con el fin de responder a la demanda en la Red del evangelio de Jesucristo a través del ministerio de la Iglesia Episcopal”, lo cual incluye la creación y mantenimiento de un banco de datos de posibles candidatos, y de cultivar a esos posibles candidatos mediante correos electrónicos, redes sociales, blogs y otros medios. La resolución también ofrece asociaciones con diócesis “para referir candidatos calificados a las congregaciones locales a plantación de iglesias o a otros ministerios apropiados”.El diputado John Crossen, de Delaware, gerente de mercadotecnia en QVC, comentó sobre las campañas digitales propuestas en la resolución: “Este es un momento de Pentecostés para la Iglesia, tenemos la oportunidad y el llamado a llegar a las personas dondequiera que estén, con frecuencia frente a sus pantallas”.Los obispos eligen a miembros del Consejo EjecutivoLa Cámara de Obispos eligió al obispo Dabney Smith del Sudeste de la Florida y al obispo Ed Konieczny, de Oklahoma, para servir en el Consejo Ejecutivo. Las elecciones deben ser confirmadas por la Cámara de Diputados.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el Canon I.4(1). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, además del Obispo Primado y el Presidente de la Cámara de Diputados [que son miembros ex oficio].— Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York General Convention 2015 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 General Convention, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Posted Jul 1, 2015 Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more