Fishing the North Coast: Smith, Chetco only options for steelhead

first_imgFollowing a fabulously wet February – and with a “Miracle March” in the making – options for winter steelhead fishing have been limited to say the least. If it wasn’t for the quick-clearing Smith and Chetco rivers, we’d be you know what. Not only are those two rivers the only game in town, they’re both kicking out some quality, fresh steelhead. The same cannot be said of the rest of the coastal streams as they’ve remained high and muddy after last week’s deluge.We aren’t forecasted for any big …last_img

Africa refocused: images of Ghana

first_imgCompiled by Mary AlexanderPopular images of Africa tend to be of two types: beautiful landscapes and exotic wildlife, or distressing poverty, disease and suffering. But Africa is not a country, easily reduced to stereotypes. It’s a vast, diverse continent with 54 separate countries, well over a thousand languages and a range of cultures, histories and religions. People live, work, love and raise families here, just like anywhere else.In the first in a series of photo galleries refocusing the image of African countries, we look at the West African nation of Ghana, on the coast of the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean. With a population of some 27-million, Ghana is rated the seventh-best governed and fifth-most stable country in Africa, with the continent’s sixth-largest economy.Maths teacher Winston Mills-Compton explains a concept to his class at the Mfantsipim Boys School in the coastal city of Cape Coast. Founded in 1876, the school is one of the oldest in the city, which is the academic centre of Ghana. Former UN secretary-general Kofi Annan was a student at Mfantsipim. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst, World Bank)The mausoleum of Kwame Nkrumah, the first president of post-colonial Ghana, in the capital city of Accra. From 1951 Nkrumah served as the leader of the Gold Coast, the colonial name for the country, oversaw independence from Britain in 1957, and was president of the newly free country until 1966. Ghana was the first sub-Saharan African country to achieve independence from colonial rule. Nkrumah was an influential activist for Pan-Africanism, and a founding member of the Organisation of African Unity. (Photo: Walter Callens, Retlaw Snellac Photography)A young woman in front of the Black Star Monument in Independence Square, Accra. The second-largest city square in the world after Tiananmen Square in China, Independence Square was commissioned by Kwame Nkrumah to honour both the country’s independence in 1957 and a visit to Ghana by British Queen Elizabeth II. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A female shopkeeper takes delivery of goods in Accra. Wholesale and retail trade is one of the most common forms of self-employment for women in Ghana’s cities. (Photo: Arne Hoel, The World Bank)A woman works in a small shop in Accra. Women make up 43.1% of economically active population of Ghana, most working in the informal sector and in food crop farming. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A baby lies on a bed protected with a mosquito net, which helps prevent the spread of malaria. Ghana’s attempts to control the disease, a major cause of poverty and low productivity, began in the 1950s. The country’s Roll Back Malaria initiative was launched in 1999. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Young boys train in a boxing club in the Jamestown neighbourhood in eastern Accra. Jamestown and bordering Usshertown are the oldest districts in the city, today home to a fishing community made up largely of the Ga linguistic group. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Young boys train in a boxing club in the Jamestown neighbourhood of Accra. Boxing is Accra’s citywide obsession, and Jamestown the centre of the sport. There are more boxing schools per square mile in Jamestown than anywhere else on earth. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Young boys train in a boxing club in the Jamestown neighbourhood of Accra. Internationally renowned boxers such as Professor Azuma Nelson and Joshua Clottey learned to fight in one of the over 20 boxing clubs in the neighbourhood. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A young boxer and his trainer at a boxing school in the Jamestown neighbourhood of Accra. The trainer’s shirt bears the image of George “Red Tiger” Ashie, an Accra-born international professional fighter who won the African Boxing Union super featherweight title, Universal Boxing Council super featherweight title, and Commonwealth lightweight title. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A student solves a problem in maths class at the Mfantsipim Boys School, one of Ghana’s oldest and best-performing schools, in the city of Cape Coast. The educational centre of Ghana, Cape Coast is home to the University of Ghana, the country’s leading university in teaching and research, as well as Cape Coast Polytechnic, Wesley Girls’ High School, St Augustine College, Adisadel College, Aggrey Memorial Senior High School and Ghana National College. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A Ghanaian girl walking to school. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A billboard advertising mobile phones flanks a cellphone tower in Accra. Ghana is the second-biggest ICT destination in Africa, after South Africa. Mobile phone penetration stands at 27-million, bigger than the national population. A 780-kilometre fibre optic cable is currently being laid across the country. (Photo: Arne Hoel)The grounds of the University of Ghana in the city of Gold Coast, with the entrance to the Balme Library in the distance. The oldest and largest Ghana’s 13 universities and tertiary institutions, it was founded in 1948 as the University College of the Gold Coast. It was originally an affiliate college of the University of London, which supervised its academic programmes and awarded degrees. In 1961 it gained full university status and, today, has some 40 000 students. (Photo: Arne Hoel)The cargo terminal of the port at the city of Tema in southeastern Ghana, on the Gulf of Guinea. Tema harbour is a major export link for goods from land-locked countries to the north of Ghana, such as Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A truck mechanic at the cargo terminal in the port of Tema. The port handles 80% of Ghana’s national exports and imports, including the bulk of the country’s major export product, cocoa. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Relaxing on a four-hour Sunday pleasure cruise on the MV Dodi Princess on Lake Volta, the largest manmade water reservoir by surface area – some 8 502 square kilometres – in the world. Attractions on the Dodi Princess include a highlife band, a wading pool, lunch and an air-conditioned cabin for refuge from the sun. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Traditional Ghanaian fishing boats set out from the ancient settlement of Elmina, once part of a colony Portuguese sea traders built on the coast of Ghana in 1482. Before the Portuguese, the town was called Anomansah, meaning “the perpetual drink”. Elmina was the first European settlement in West Africa, the site of the Africa’s first European colonial war – between Spain and Portugal in 1478 – and for centuries the launch point of the Transatlantic slave trade from West Africa. (Photo: Walter Callens, Retlaw Snellac Photography)Hulls of ships docked at Tema Harbour on the southeastern coast of Ghana. (Photo: Curt Carnemark, World Bank)Boys play on a pirogue, a traditional fishing boat, on a beach in coastal Ghana. Pirogue boats are found all over the world, from Louisiana to Madagascar, but Ghana’s handmade dugouts are possibly the most ornate – carved with motifs, painted in bright colours, and often captioned with biblical quotes and smart sayings. Artisanal fishing in pirogues contributes a great deal to Ghana’s informal economy. (Ghana. Photo: Arne Hoel)A technician supervises the processing of cocoa beans into cocoa liquor at the Golden Tree chocolate plant in the port city of Tema. Cocoa – raw and processed – is Ghana’s main export, even though the cocoa plant is not indigenous to the country. The Golden Tree company produces high-quality cocoa products, including chocolate bars that will not melt in the West African heat. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)The control room at the Takoradi thermal power station in Aboadze, 17 kilometres east of the city of Sekondi-Takoradi on the southwestern coast of Ghana. The country generates electricity from hydropower, fossil fuels, thermal energy and renewable energy sources. Ghana’s power generation infrastructure is so developed it is able to not only meet local needs, but export electricity to neighbouring countries. The country is also committed to carbon-free, renewable energy. A $400-million project to build the largest solar power plant in Africa is likely to go online in 2015. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Traders work on the floor of the Ghana Stock Exchange in Accra. The exchange, established in 1990, is one of the best-performing in Africa. Its composite index rose by 78.8% in 2013. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A trader working the Ghana Stock Exchange in the financial district of Accra. The exchange has 37 listed companies, who saw a 55% increase in value, in US dollar terms, in 2013. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A worker mixes concrete for maintenance of the N1 national road between Accra, the capital of Ghana, and Gold Coast, the country’s centre of education. Roads and highways, the country’s main transport systems, are constantly being upgraded. In 2012 some US$500-million was spent on expanding Ghana’s road network. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)The clock tower of Balme Library reflected in the sunglasses of a student at the University of Ghana in the city of Gold Coast. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A worker feeling the heat at 330 metres underground at the Anglo Ashanti gold mine in Obuasi. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Workers sprayed with sawdust at a lumber factory in Accra. (Photo: Curt Carnemark)A young Ghanaian man holding a child. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A child of Ghana. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Ghanaian girls eat a school-sponsored lunch. (Photo: Arne Hoe)A woman walks through the streets of Accra, Ghana’s capital and major city. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A woman entrepreneur outside her business. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Morning assembly at a rural primary school in Ghana. (Photo: Arne Hoel)A news camera captures proceedings at Ghana’s parliament in Accra. As a former British colony, the country’s lawmaking process is based on the UK parliamentary system. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)The newsroom at the Joy FM radio studios in Accra. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)On air at the Joy FM studios in Accra. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)A radio technician at work. (Photo: Arne Hoel)People’s reflections in a water tank in rural Ghana. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Pineapple seedlings being planted in the nursery at Bomart Farms in Nsawam, near Accra. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst)Traditional Kente cloth on sale at a market in Kumasi, the centre of the Ashanti region of southern Ghana. (Photo: Adam Jones)Air Ghana aircraft on runway at Kotoka International Airport in Accra. The carrier provides cargo and passenger services throughout West and Central Africa. (Photo: Arne Hoel)Buildings in Accra’s financial district. (Photo: JB Dodane, Flickr)last_img read more

McAfee Buys Trust Digital Mobile Security

first_imgRole of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologycenter_img Tags:#mobile#security#web curt hopkins McAfee, the computer security firm, announced that it is buying Trust Digital, a smartphone management and security software company. McAfee, which has nearly $2 billion per year in sales, is hoping the acquisition of Trust Digital will allow it to present a total security loop, from endpoint, McAfee’s speciality, through a company’s smartphones, and back again.Trust Digital helps “secure and manage corporate smartphones and PDAs” worldwide. They are global leader, though they have only about 40 employees to McAfee’s 6,000. Trust Digital’s offerings support iPhone OS, Android, Web OS, Windows Mobile, and Symbian mobile operating systems. McAfee expects to mesh these with its ePolicy Orchestrator, its “enterprise-class, open platform to centrally manage security for systems, networks, data, and compliance solutions.”The companies expect the deal to close by June 30. McAfee’s shares fell 11% last month, as its Q1 revenues and forecast came in under Wall Street estimates. That was in part due to the faulty signature it released that misidentified a Microsoft XP system file as a threat, along with foreign currency changes and a stock buyback. The negotiations on the company’s purchase of Trust Digital would have begun long before that, but the hope no doubt is that this move will contribute toward reconciling future earnings with shareholder and analyst expectations. last_img read more

Two troopers of 18 Assam Rifles killed in Manipur blast

first_imgTwo troopers of 18 Assam Rifles were killed and six others injured in a bomb blast in Manipur’s Chandel district near the India-Myanmar border on Monday, sources in the police said.Suspected insurgents detonated a remote-controlled bomb on the roadside near the District Collectorate at 6 a.m. and Rifleman Indra Singh was killed on the spot, while Rifleman Sohalal died of his injuries within hours.The troopers, along with armed guards, were on their morning jog. Additional forces from neighbouring districts have been rushed to launch a massive combing operation.No outfit has yet claimed responsibility for the attack.last_img

Ruckus in Haryana Assembly

first_imgThe Haryana Assembly Monday witnessed an hour-long ruckus during the Zero Hour when Speaker Kanwar Pal disallowed INLD’s adjournment motion on the SYL canal issue, following which the opposition members staged a symbolic walkout from the House. As soon as the Zero Hour began, INLD’s senior leader Abhay Singh Chautala, who is also the Leader of Opposition in the Assembly, sought to know from the Speaker the fate of his party’s adjournment motion moved over non-completion of the Sutlej Yamuna Link canal. However, the Speaker disallowed the motion, saying “the matter is sub-judice and therefore, cannot be taken up in the Assembly for debate.” Dissatisfied with his reply, Mr. Chautala said, “There is no issue concerning SYL which is pending before courts.” Congress’ Karan Singh Dalal said, “Employees of various departments are protesting on the streets, but the government has invoked ESMA to crush their democratic right to protest.” Mr. Chautala also made a mention of the Essential Services Maintenance Act (ESMA), saying “it has been invoked to create fear among employees so that they do not raise their voice in the future”. “How can this (SYL) be disallowed…there is nothing pending before court. Is SYL issue not important? Should it not be discussed in the House. First and foremost, this issue should be taken up,” Mr. Chautala said.Slogans against govt. Later, the Indian National Lok Dal members raised slogans against government. The Congress MLAs raised slogans and dubbed the government as “anti-farmers, anti-traders and anti-employees“. As the ruckus in the House continued, the INLD members staged a symbolic walkout to protest their adjournment motion on SYL being disallowed.last_img read more

Apple to Release Red iPhone 8 This Week

first_imgApple announced a red version of its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus Monday. The limited-edition models will benefit (RED), a non-profit co-founded by U2’s Bono in 2006 to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.The new phones, officially dubbed the “iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus (PRODUCT)RED Special Edition,” feature the same innards as the regular iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, combined with a red glass enclosure and aluminum bands as well as a black front.In addition, Apple is also making a (PRODUCT)RED iPhone X leather case available for sale Tuesday. The phones will be available for pre-order starting Tuesday, and reach stores on Friday.This isn’t the first time Apple has released red versions of its phones. The company partnered with the charity all the way back in 2006, and has since donated more than $160 million to its global fund, which makes Apple the biggest corporate donor. There is no word on how much money Apple donates per sale of one of these red phones, or how many of these devices it has sold over the years. ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15center_img Popular on Variety last_img read more