Three storm-damaged bridges reopen along Route 12A

first_imgThe Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) today opened three storm-damaged bridges along Route 12A that will provide area residents better access to both Route 100 and Interstate 89. A short segment of Route 12A in Roxbury just north of Carrie Howe Road still remains closed as both a culvert and a bridge still need to be replaced, but the three newly opened bridges allow Roxbury residents to travel north to Northfield as well as south to Randolph along Route 12A. ‘In all three locations, we were able to repair and reopen bridges that were damaged by Tropical Storm Irene,’ said VTrans Secretary Brian Searles. ‘These repairs allow residents of not only Roxbury, but also Granville and Braintree to have access to Interstate 89, which will return their travel ability to close to normal.’ Two of the three newly opened bridges are located along the northern segment of Route 12A ‘ one is in Northfield, the other is in Roxbury ‘ while the third bridge is located along the southern segment of Route 12A in Braintree. The newly opened bridges north of Roxbury Village also reestablish access to the Warren Mountain Road, a town highway that provides area residents with a connection to Route 100. The remaining closed segment of Route 12A just north of Carrie Howe Road will remain closed into the fall as neither the culvert nor the bridge can be repaired. VTrans plans to replace the culvert with a short bridge, and must also replace the damaged bridge with a new one. Work to design and engineer these structures is already underway.  Construction activity will begin later this fall. For up-to-date information on storm-related openings and closings, people can call the Irene recovery call center at 1-800-VERMONT or go to the Agency’s homepage at www.aot.state.vt.uswhere(link is external) they can sign up for alerts pushed to their mobile phone. You can also follow VTrans’ recovery efforts on both Facebook and Twitter.last_img read more

Four-day Test to have minimum of 98 overs per day

first_img(REUTERS) – A minimum of 98 overs will be played on each day of the inaugural four-day Test between South Africa and Zimbabwe starting later this month in Port Elizabeth.The African neighbours will play the first test match shortened by one day from Dec. 26, with the International Cricket Council (ICC) granting it official status and welcoming countries to experiment with the format.ICC playing conditions deem that a minimum of 90 overs must be bowled per day during a five-day Test match, so play will be extended for an extra 30 minutes to accommodate the additional eight overs.A first-innings lead of 150 will be enough to enforce the follow-on in the day-night fixture in Port Elizabeth, 50 runs less than the runs needed in the five-day format.Test matches, the game’s oldest format, have witnessed a steady decline in attendances in recent years, throwing the door open to a number of novel means to engage fans, including the introduction of day-night tests.The format has come in for stiff competition from the game’s newer, shorter formats, such as Twenty20 internationals and domestic leagues across the globe.Officials and former players have acknowledged the need to make tests four-day affairs instead of five, hoping it would help them become more viewer friendly.last_img read more