First phase of groundwater management plan completed

first_imgWorkers at the groundwater sourcesThe Guyana Water Incorporated (GWI) has announced the completion of the first phase of its groundwater management plan, which entailed the geophysical logging of 100 wells along the coast of Guyana.This was revealed on Wednesday when the company stated that groundwater needs to be sustained, given the fact that it represents some 90 per cent of the supply chain on the coastland and 70 per cent countrywide. Adding to that, it is the “most reliable” source of potable water, furthering the need to sustain these sources.Groundwater is primarily extracted in Guyana using wells but the logging mechanism was implemented to garner data on the coastland aquifers and soil composition.For the project, GWI stated that “The logging was carried out in collaboration with Deltares, an applied research institute in water and subsurface environment and the Inter-American Development Bank under the Water Supply and Sanitation Infrastructure Improvement Programme (WSSIIP).”Manager of Water Resources and Climate Adaptation at GWI, Orin Browne had explained at a recent workshop that the outcome of the geophysical well logging survey was analysed and interpreted with the help of previous data. This information was interpreted and is being entered into a database which will form a physical model of the aquifer system.“The idea of building the model is to enable us to have a tool for predicting our groundwater abstraction and use because we realise that for Guyana’s future and the growth of future generations, there must be an integrated approach towards groundwater management and for the overall water resources management,” Brown had stated.Eight engineers from the utility company were also trained in modern well-logging techniques, analysis and data visualisations, which will be a crucial factor in GWI’s in-house well-drilling capacity with the acquisition of a new drilling rig.Guyana Times understands that when this database is completed, agencies such as the Hydrometeorological centre of the Agriculture Ministry, the Office of Climate Change, the Communities Ministry, the Guyana Geology and Mines Commission (GGMC), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Banks DIH Limited will be given access to the information.Acting Chief Hydromet Officer, Garvin Cummings was among the stakeholders to welcome the initiative since his agency is mandated to license well drillers.“All wells being drilled across the country should be guided by Hydromet. Obviously, this kind of information has not been available before, so once available to Hydromet, it will guide us in terms of the licensing of wells and well owners and well drillers. So it’s really critical to what we do, it is a guide to what we do in terms of where wells should be drilled and hopefully this can grow into helping us determine the abstraction rates for wells,” he stated.last_img read more

GAA NEWS: GLENSWILLY GAA CLUB NOTES

first_imgThe Ulster semi final of Scór na nÓg took place last Friday night in Glenswilly. Unfortunately the Nuachleas team were narrowly defeated by St Enda’s from Omagh. Many thanks to everyone who helped in any way in the running of this event. The club would like to wish all the Donegal representatives well in the Ulster Final in January.The Under Age presentation will take place in the club hall on Thursday 20th December at 7pm. Special guests will include Michael Murphy, Neil Gallagher, Gary McFadden and Sam Maguire.Circuits have finished up for the Christmas season and will begin again on Monday 6th January at 7pm for ladies and 8pm for men with new members welcome. Cost €5 per night or €40 for 10 weeks. Lotto numbers this week were 14,17,21 and 23. Match 2 winner was Brendan Walsh. Next week’s jackpot is €1660 and sellers are Gary McFadden and Gary McDaid.The AGM will take place on Friday 11th January at 8.15pm.GAA NEWS: GLENSWILLY GAA CLUB NOTES was last modified: December 11th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Glenswilly GAA Club noteslast_img read more

Sensex cracks after RBIs status quo on repo rate Sun Pharma tanks

first_imgKey equity benchmarks reversed all the gains and fell sharply in the last hour trade as the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) surprised the market by maintaining status quo in policy rates on Wednesday.While the 30-share index Sensex lost 0.59 percent to close at 26,236.87, the 50-share index Nifty ended the trade at 8,102.05, down 0.5 percent.Shares of Sun Pharma tanked 5.97 percent to close at Rs 664 as US drug regulator issued observations after inspecting company’s Halol plant. Banking shares also fell with Bank of Baroda and Axis Bank witnessing selling pressure on Wednesday.However, shares of Eicher Motors, HDFC, BPCL and Adani Ports bucked the trend and closed in the green. Market breadth turned negative with sharp fall in rate sensitive sectors post RBI’s decision not to cut policy rates. Slashing of GDP growth rate forecast by RBI also weighed on investors’ sentiments.However, the central bank’s decision to remove the incremental cash reserve for banks from December 10 provided some support to the market. After RBI’s decision not to change key policy rates, analysts were of the view that market would wait for upcoming Federal Reserve policy meeting scheduled on December 13-14 for future direction. Meanwhile, Indian currency appreciated 0.40 percent to close Wednesday trade at 67.93 against dollar.last_img read more

Myanmar photojournalists freed on bail

first_imgPolice have released two Myanmar photojournalists covering the Rohingya crisis for a German magazine after they were granted bail by a court, police and a lawyer said.Minzayar Oo and Hkun Lat were detained early this month in the border district of Cox’s Bazar, where more than 420,000 Rohingya Muslims have sought refuge from violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine state since 25 August.Police have said they were arrested on suspicion of espionage-a charge rejected by the pair’s lawyers.“They were freed on bail,” a police inspector told AFP, speaking on condition of anonymity as he is not authorised to speak to the media.One of the pair’s lawyers, Jyotirmoy Barua, confirmed that the two were granted bail by a court of a judicial magistrate in Cox’s Bazar.It was not clear whether the two would be allowed to travel back to Myanmar.The lawyer said the two were charged with “false impersonation” and providing “false information” after police accused them of using tourist visas to enter the country, instead of journalist visas.Cox’s Bazar police, however, earlier told AFP the pair were also “primarily accused of espionage”.An award-winning photographer from Bangladesh also arrested with the pair was later freed.Scores of foreign journalists have poured into Bangladesh’s southeast to cover the Rohingya exodus.The UN has accused Buddhist-dominated Myanmar of waging an ethnic cleansing campaign against the stateless group.Minzayar Oo and Hkun Lat arrived in Cox’s Bazar in early September on assignment for Hamburg-based magazine Geo to cover the refugee crisis, which has strained relations between Muslim-majority Bangladesh and Myanmar.The lawyer described Minzayar Oo as “an award winning photographer whose work was published in reputed dailies and magazines including the New York Times, Guardian and National Geographic”.The New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists has urged Bangladesh to release the photographers and drop all charges against them.“The Bangladeshi authorities should not criminalise covering a major world story,” said CPJ deputy executive director Robert Mahoney said last week.“Both local and international journalists reporting on the Rohingya story must be allowed to work freely,” he said.Read more:Bangladesh accuses two Myanmar journalists of ‘espionage’last_img read more

Why Some Homeowners Are Scrambling To Prepay Their 2018 Property Taxes

first_imgSheila Thompson/FlickrSome homeowners across the country are rushing to pay their 2018 property taxes well before the due date because the new Republican tax law overhaul could affect how much they are allowed to deduct next year.Part of the Republican tax overhaul that President Trump signed into law last week has homeowners around the country doing something unusual: rushing to pay their 2018 property taxes well before the due date.That’s because the new law includes a $10,000 cap on the amount of state and local taxes people can deduct on their federal returns. Before, if someone paid $24,000 in property taxes — as some people in higher tax states like New York and California do — and then paid $20,000 in state and local income taxes they were allowed to deduct $44,000 on their federal tax return. Now that number is capped at $10,000. The change could cost some people thousands of dollars.“I’m sending my checks in today,” said Vanessa Merton of Hastings-On-Hudson, N.Y. She estimates the law change will cost her between $6,000 and $9,000. She hopes to delay that hit by prepaying next year’s taxes before Dec. 31 so she can deduct them on her 2017 tax return.Merton says she is the fourth generation of her family to live in her large home. When she was growing up, she says, Hastings-On-Hudson was a factory town, but then wealthy people moved in and now property values — and taxes — have increased. She predicts that without the ability to deduct all local taxes on federal returns, some people in her community may have to move.“We are all really wondering, calculating and trying to figure out if it’s going to be possible [to stay] in the homes that we have cherished for a very long time,” said Merton.Merton works as a law professor and also is vice chair of her local Democratic Party committee. She sees politics at play in the new law, since most states with higher taxes tend to vote for Democrats over Republicans.That echoes criticism New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has voiced against the tax overhaul law. Cuomo signed an executive order last Friday making it easier for people to pay their taxes early and make partial payments.That had local tax offices fielding calls the day after Christmas as homeowners tried to figure out how much they should pay. An automated message at the Nassau County Department of Assessment asked people to call later because, “all assessment assistance personnel are busy with other callers.”In neighboring New Jersey, accountant Tracy Beveridge said she has been fielding calls and emails from clients. She warns that not everyone should prepay property taxes and that it is difficult to offer simple guidelines — which is especially true for those who could be subject to a minimum tax, for example a married couple who earn more than $83,800 a year and file a joint return.“If a client is in AMT — what they call an alternative minimum tax — there is no benefit to prepaying your taxes. It just negates the benefit and you’re just out the cash,” said Beveridge.Beveridge said some people who would not be subject to the AMT could trigger it if they double up on paying next year’s property taxes early.Her advice is to consult with an accountant who can look over your previous return and offer advice. In the past few days, Beveridge said, she has examined dozens of her clients’ returns and that “out of, probably, 80 that I’ve done already, I think, four it has benefited [to prepay property taxes].”That benefit applies only to property taxes, she said, because the new law doesn’t allow people to prepay income taxes.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more

Blacks in Wax Museum Expands and Fights for Community

first_imgWax figures of Black soldiers. (Courtesy photo)When you hear the phrase ‘wax figurines’, your mind probably jumps to either Madame Tussauds or The Great Blacks In Wax Museum right here in Baltimore. If you were born and raised here, chances are you have already been to it as a child. There’s also a chance that you too have probably been frightened to near tears by the jarring realness of the slave ship exhibit. Its okay if you have, because of the three times I’ve visited, I’ve only had to leave once due to uncontrollable tears.The owner and co-founder, Joanne Martin, is used to that. She actually expects and doesn’t treat it as some weird uncomfortable thing. “When I have young people that come in and cry because of the slave ship, I’m not as upset as a parent might be,” she says. “That, for me, is part of what I want to happen. It means that we have some empathy and we won’t be so quick to kill one of our own”.Recently, our city’s beloved museum has announced plans for a massive renovation and expansion. The expansion will take over the entire 1600 block of North Ave, stretching between Broadway and Bond Street with plans for a garden, a theater and educational programs.In an exclusive interview with The Afro, we caught up with Martin for more details about this piece of Baltimore history.The idea of expansion for Blacks in Wax was always in the works for Martin and her late husband, Dr. Elmer Martin, but did not officially get underway until his passing in 2001.“One day, I found myself on a ship on the Nile river dealing with his sudden death. I made a vow to God and him that I would spend my life carrying out his dream,” she said. “When you walk around the museum, it’s like walking around the head of Elmer.”Wax figure of Bessie Coleman. (Courtesy photo)“My husband always said that we had to be a museum with a message, not just black figures standing around. They had to be a part of a bigger story,” she said.Martin hopes that the expansion will not only fulfill her husband’s wishes, but bring some much needed tourism to the economically deprived area.“I don’t think that we should think our neighborhoods aren’t worthwhile and that you have to leave them to find something good,” she said. “My husband and I wanted to show that tourism can thrive in that area. Visitors come from all over to this fragile community for the Blacks in Wax.”So far, the expansion boasts ideas for a sculpture garden, an improvement upon their standing educational programs and even a small marketplace for budding entrepreneurs.The rear of the museum will house a beautiful entryway as well as a cultural and community hub for guests to experience.“The rear of the museum will be a major entrance, so that area will be a garden space. Phase 1 of the idea of a sculpture garden is planting trees native to the city.”The massive plans are an effort to shine a positive light back onto the city and help educate the youth.“We are making it the education institution that it should be and expanding on programs that we have for children,” she said. “We are talking to other venues in Baltimore and showing them how to become a curator, designing your own studio and etc.”“There will be film screenings and panel discussions afterwards,” she said. “We’re having a place for art exhibition, places to sell fashion designs and [building] economic opportunity”.Since the opening of the museum in 1983, its main mission has always involved what it can do for the community.“We are trying in every way to be a force for change, create job opportunities and have a cultural hub on that block,” she said. “The 1500 block would be an Uhure Village, which is Swahili for ‘let us come together”.It is not only a mission to Martin for the community to come together, but for the city itself to see the combined efforts of everyone to rebuild and take a step back. She feels that the city could ‘do better’ in terms of seeing the extended vision of this expansion.“I’d like to see [Baltimore city government] do better but I think we need to do a better job of helping them to see the vision,” she said. “I feel that maybe we have tried and missed the mark but we will try again.”“We will sit down with them and talk about what this project means in terms of jobs, community building and tourism development.”She feels that after that is done, there is ‘no reason’ that the Blacks in Wax and other museums should not ‘be funded to the level they feel they deserve’. As the museum continues to look to the local and state government for more federal dollars, they also appreciate the efforts of their everyday supporters and donors.“The ways in which we have to come together to build the African American community and get back to that commitment of family is what we will try to do”.last_img read more