Kress named dean of Ohio State CFAES

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio State University has recommended the appointment of Cathann Arceneaux Kress, PhD, as vice president for agricultural administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). She currently is vice president for extension and outreach and director of cooperative extension at Iowa State University. Subject to approval by Ohio State’s Board of Trustees, Kress will begin her appointment May 1.“It’s an honor to join the incredible community of faculty, staff and volunteers dedicated to all of CFAES’s missions in education, research, outreach and service. I’m excited by the opportunities and multiple ways we can enhance the capacities and impacts of CFAES,” Kress said. “I’d like to thank the members of the search committee for their service, and I look forward to meeting many colleagues, students, alumni and friends in the coming months.”As vice president for agricultural administration and dean of CFAES, Kress will be the chief academic and administrative officer of the college and will be responsible for leading its education, research, service and outreach missions. The dean also leads fundraising efforts and facilitates strategic internal and external relationships of the college.“I look forward to working with Cathann as we move forward with an ambitious agenda for our college and university,” said Bruce A. McPheron, PhD, Ohio State’s executive vice president and provost.In her current role, Kress leads the land-grant mission of teaching, research and service for the public good at Iowa State. This $100 million operation connects the full assets of the university with all of Iowa. Her success in using university-wide outreach programs to enhance education and innovation in Iowa communities has aligned with her key responsibility to advise the president and provost on extension and outreach issues.Kress has taught undergraduate and graduate students at all levels. In addition, her research and applied research efforts have focused on impacts on rural populations. For example, her work has included the impacts of multiple deployments on dependent children of National Guard and Reserve service members; programs to assist disadvantaged children, youth and families; and on achievement gaps that impact rural youth.Prior to her leadership at Iowa State, Kress served as a senior policy analyst of Military Community and Family Policy at the Department of Defense in Washington, D.C. In addition, she has served as director of youth development at the National 4-H Headquarters, U.S. Department of Agriculture, also in Washington, D.C.; and as assistant director, Cornell Cooperative Extension, and state program leader at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.Among her many national leadership roles, she currently serves as a trustee of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Board in Battle Creek, Michigan; secretary and incoming chair, administrative heads section of the Board on Agriculture Assembly, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities; and as a National 4-H Council trustee.Kress earned a BS in social work at Iowa State and an MA in counselor education/college student development and a PhD in education, both from the University of Iowa.last_img read more

A first-generation farm’s success

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Kayla Hawthorne, OCJ field reporterIn 2012 Brad and Mindy Thornburg bought 11 Angus-Simmental cross cows “sight unseen” through a deal with a friend. Thornburg Cattle was an adventure from the start of the first-generation farm near Barnesville in Belmont County, but they expected nothing less. They have battled through numerous challenges since then and their resulting success was highlighted in January when Brad was named the Young Cattleman of the Year by the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association.The Young Cattleman of the Year Award is presented to individuals or couples, typically under 40 years of age, who have demonstrated the initial stages of a successful beef operation and exhibited leadership potential. The recipient is also the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association’s automatic nominee to participate in the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Young Cattlemen’s Conference held in early February.The Thornburgs have worked hard to make their own way in the cattle business, but have relied heavily on the insight and expertise from others in the industry. Neither Brad nor Mindy were raised on farms, but they both had a passion for cattle and they met while working with cattle. Brad got his experience with cattle by working at sale barns and with veterinarians.“I actually had five or six Red Angus heifers I picked up when I still worked at a sale barn — just deals that had come by,” Brad said.Brad was talking to an old friend about the need to artificially inseminate his cattle, not knowing he had a sister in the business.“Probably 10 minutes later she pulled in my driveway and we struck a deal to breed my cows. Within two weeks we were breeding them and had them ready to go,” Brad said. “After that I asked, ‘Hey, what are you doing later? Want to go out to eat?’ ‘Hey, want to get married?’ It kind of went pretty quick. It wasn’t any more than a year I think.”Brad and Mindy started the farm right after they got married and they are each 50% owners. For purposes of efficiency and economics, they bought embryos to place in their 40 cows, instead of breeding unwanted genetics. The Thornburgs still use embryo transfer to improve their genetics. Mindy currently works in animal health for Zoetis and puts her expertise to work in the farm operation.The Young Cattleman of the Year Award was presented to Brad Thornburg of Belmont County.“That’s the fastest way that we know to get your genetic quality up,” Brad said. “We don’t run a bull. We take care of everything through AI and ET.”The Thornburgs have a three-strike rule. If a cow comes back in heat for a third time, she leaves the farm.“We try to get [our calving cycle] at two cycles. So, under 60 days is what we try to keep it at,” Mindy said. “That’s how we decide our culls, if they don’t breed in two heat cycles, they go. Our goal is to calve in January and sell by July 4.”Along with starting from scratch with their cattle, the young couple started from scratch with their land as well. Competition from oil and gas interests in eastern Ohio has made it more difficult to find and purchase land in recent years. The Thornburgs say they were lucky to find the initial land they were able to purchase, but it needed extensive work to be suitable for efficient cattle production.“That limited us on being able to buy any more out here that was actually already half set up for either production or cattle,” Brad said.They initially bought an 80-acre piece of property but 65 acres were wooded. They have since spent many hours clearing the property to maximize the opportunities to pasture the cattle.“Brad and I have started working with the EQIP program to get this farm back in shape. Basically when we got it, it needed a lot of work,” Mindy said. “So we started looking with our local conservation group and trying to build proper rotational grazing and trying to make it sustainable and environmentally friendly to raise these cattle on this land so that it is here for generations to come.”They have been able to add some more ground since then to expand pastures further.“We bought a little farm a couple years ago — about 35 acres or so. And it’s in a rehabilitation process, too,” Brad said. “We ended up realizing that it is going to be a real challenge to get any more ground.”The Thornburgs pasture their 40 cows on all 115 acres they own. Additionally, they rent around 400 acres from neighbors for hay, which they use for their cows in the winter and to sell. Their goal was to build their herd to 100 cows.“We’re at the point that 115 acres is not going to support the operation that we’d like to get to someday with the goal we had in mind,” Brad said.With off-farm jobs, three children and the cattle operation, time is also often a limiting factor for the farm.“We work off farm but we somehow manage to make it happen between the two of us,” Mindy said.The Thornburgs work hard to provide the right nutrition for the cattle produce a high quality end product from their operation with a heavy emphasis on grass and less additional supplementation. Brad wants to continue emphasizing grasses as the operation moves forward.“I would like to graze 365 days of the year — short of some major ice event or 5 feet of snow. The more grass I can raise, the less grain I have to buy,” Brad said. “We’re trying to implement rotational grazing and intensive grazing and even some mob grazing. We tried that this year and it was fairly successful.”Brad is always researching new ideas to improve production through the resources available on their land by extending the grazing opportunities.“We rely on a lot of professionals and all these people who have put out papers and studies about trials,” Brad said. “I’m a reader. I read a lot.”The calves are sold to a middleman who puts together a semi load of black, Angus-based calves, which are sold to a feedlot in the West or on the Internet. The Thornburgs get reports on the calves to monitor the farm’s performance and provide insights in how details can be tweaked for future improvement.“We’re willing to adapt and change for whatever we need to raise and market our cattle the best way we can,” Brad said.Along with the countless hours he spends working directly with the cattle, Brad also takes time to serve as a director for District 7 of the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association and will finish his two-term limit in 2020. They are also members of the Ohio Valley Cattlemen’s Association for Belmont, Nobel, Monroe, Harrison and Jefferson counties.The Thornburgs were very honored to receive the recent award from the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, but they have no idea who nominated them for the recognition.“We were happy — tickled to death,” Brad said. “But we would like to try to find out who [nominated us] just for the ‘thanks.’”The first generation farm has been built with the Thornburg’s sweat-equity driven by a love of raising cattle and willingness to learn from others.“We’re self-sufficient to try to keep the cost low,” Brad said. “We didn’t have parents who did this. We didn’t have uncles who gave us anything. This came out of my pocket from laying brick and her pocket from breeding cows. We are grateful for all these professionals going before us. We wouldn’t be where we’re at if we didn’t have somebody to learn from.”last_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast November 25, 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We have 2 dry days over Ohio before our next frontal complex arrives. Generally speaking, we have 2 well organized systems moving through the region in the next 10 days, and it will be difficult to see any more than about 2 days in between the two. The map at right shows 10 day liquid equivalent precipitation totals.  Thanksgiving looks dry. Here is the breakdown.Today we are dry with milder air and some sunshine. We start similar tomorrow, but we are likely going to see clouds build in the afternoon. Temps tomorrow remain mild.After midnight tomorrow night, we start to see light moisture moving into the western part of Ohio. Action will be rain, as temps stay mild on south flow. Through Wednesday several waves of moisture move through the state, before all action ends. We think we see anywhere from .25″-.6″ of rain over 100% of Ohio out of the entire event.We are dry for Thanksgiving. Expect some sunshine early, but clouds likely start to develop again later in afternoon and overnight.System number 2 comes through for Black Friday through Saturday. That system may start with some snow early on Friday, as temps are still chilly from Thanksgiving. But, as temps rise we see  most action come as rain. Liquid equivalent precipitation totals should end up between .25″-.75″, with coverage at 90%.Significantly colder air comes in behind that system. Temps go well below normal, and we likely see some lake effect snow for later Sunday into Monday. We wont rule out a coating to a couple of inches of accumulations in that period, with coverage at 70%. However, by Monday afternoon, that snow moves out, but clouds stay.Dry and cold to finish the 10 day window for the 3rd and 4th, with clouds and sunshine. Temps will stay well below normal, but will moderate likely on Wednesday the 4th.last_img read more

Do the Work You Are Capable Of

first_imgOne summer I was invited to work for the husband of a family friend. The job was mindless, something anyone could do. It was also repetitive and mindless. But the pay was pretty good for a teenage kid, and I needed the money.I worked harder than anyone around me. I also worked faster than anyone around me. I was doubling and tripling the output of the full time employees, and it was not going unnoticed. The managers and supervisors were impressed, and they praised my work, even though I did not believe there was anything exceptional to what I was doing.At break, a number of the full time employees cornered me. They told me to slow down to the pace of the rest of the workers there. They told me that I was making them look bad, and that they were being paid for that level of production, so they weren’t going to work any harder.I was too young to know how to handle it, and I was intimidated by a group of much older people cornering me to insist I slow down. So, I ended up finding a way to work by myself, and at my own pace.Up until this point, I wasn’t aware that this mindset existed.Here’s the thing. When you do only the minimum work you are capable of, you will only be paid the minimum amount commensurate with that work. Withholding the real value you can create only ensures that you are never earn what you are capable of earning.The full time employees believed they were punishing the company by producing less than they were capable of, but in reality, they were taking money out of their pockets.A poor mindset leads to poor activities and poor results. Do the work you are capable of. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

‘Cong., BJP nexus with miners is clear’

first_imgThe Aam Aadmi Party’s Goa unit has criticised the BJP-led ruling coalition and the Congress over the proposed all-party delegation to raise the issue of mining ore licenses with central ministers in New Delhi.In a press release issued here AAP leader Siddarth Karapurkar questioned the “nexus” between the ruling and opposition parties in planning the Delhi meeting to urge the Union Mines Minister Narendra Singh Tomar and Transport Minister Nitin Gadkari to “find out means and ways so that mining operations in the State were not affected due to Supreme Court order”.The Supreme Court has directed that all mining activities on 87 cancelled leases be stopped from March 15.Mr. Karapurkar called it as yet another case of a friendship between the Congress and BJP and its alliance partners to sell the interests of the State to a few miners. AAP also lamented that the absence of a responsible opposition in the legislature is strikingly visible.The AAP has alleged that a few MLAs of both parties, whose stakes in the mining business is no secret, are grouping together in the name of this all-party delegation to New Delhi.Mr. Karapurkar demanded that the people of Goa must know what dialogue this delegation will have with the Central Ministers and people must also know what are the advantages and disadvantages of such a course for the State.“Mining resource is a wealth of the people,” he asserted and lamented that the all-party delegation, was “surely carrying a brief of a select few who have been enjoying the mining wealth of the State hitherto as payback for the funding they have been receiving for their political careers.”The AAP leader pointed out that while the senior-most Minister in the government, Sudin Dhavlikar, had in justification of their proposed Delhi delegation, said the State faces a loss of ₹3,500 crore and the ban will affect 2 lakh people, he has not spoken of who is going to recover the “loot of the mining wealth as estimated by Justice (retd) M. B. Shah Commission in its report on illegal mining. Why is there no clarity on that?” he asked.last_img read more