Two Valley men die in separate shootings

first_imgTwo men were killed in unrelated shootings in the San Gabriel Valley Tuesday morning. In Baldwin Park at about 7 a.m., shots were fired near Stewart and Live Oak avenues, according to the Sheriff’s Headquarters Bureau. Baldwin Park police Lt. Raul Martinez said a 60-year-old man was pronounced dead at Kaiser Permanente Baldwin Park Medical Center after suffering a gunshot wound to the upper torso. No arrests had been made and the victim’s name had not been released. Deputy Luis Castro said anyone with any information should contact the Sheriff’s Headquarters Bureau at (323) 890-5500. In Hacienda Heights, a 37-year-old man was fatally shot at his home on the 1800 block of Charlemont Avenue around 10 a.m. Edward Berber died at the scene from at least one gunshot wound to the head, authorities said. The victim was found in bed, said Industry Sheriff’s Sgt. Dean Scoville. No arrests were reported, and no other information was immediately available. From staff and wire reports AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

The other Rugby World Cup

first_img480 social rugby players from around theworld will converge on Cape Town in June2009 for the inaugural world championship.(Image: Social Rugby World Championship) Children playing rugby in one of TagRugby’s community programmes.(Image: Tag Rugby)Janine ErasmusSouth Africa hosts the world’s first social rugby tournament in Cape Town in June 2009. The event is aimed at those players for whom the sport is more of an abiding passion than a high-paying job, and already numerous social rugby teams from as far afield as New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, Catalonia and the US have signed up.The principle behind the social rugby tournament is to give enthusiasts who play the game at a social level, mostly those between the ages of 18 and 39, a chance to play their chosen sport in a competitive yet friendly environment and to enjoy the camaraderie associated with a team sport.The tournament will coincide with the Confederations Cup of football and the highly anticipated South African tour by the British and Irish Lions. But fans will be entertained by far more than just the British Lions’ attempt at revenge for their 6-42 humiliation in November 2008 at the hands (and boots) of current world champions, the South African Springboks.The action will take place at Brookside, home to Cape Town’s 132-year-old Villagers rugby club. Sixteen teams will play 40 matches in a round robin format over the first five days before going into the semi-final and final stages to decide the winners of the Cup, Plate, Bowl and Shield trophies.So far South Africa is represented by the Galetti Fourths, based at Villagers, their bitter rivals the Shebeen Boys also from Cape Town, and the Old Boys Fourths from Durban.A major worldwide sporting eventAccording to the official Social Rugby Tournament website, the 2007 Rugby World Cup held in France attracted a record television audience of 4.2-billion, while live events were attended by over 2.2-million sports fans.But the game has become increasingly specialised and time-intensive, say the organisers and mid-level or club rugby players don’t get enough opportunities to just play for fun any more. And while professional rugby is gaining a bigger worldwide audience and new countries are taking up the sport every year, there was no international competitive outlet for those who play for fun.Until now! Former advertising executives Rolf Fitschen and Graham Lindemann, the driving force behind the inaugural social rugby tournament, are looking forward to the kick-off. With 20 years of professional experience behind them, the two created BigFish Sports Productions especially to run the event, after identifying a need for a tournament run on a social level. Fitschen and Lindemann are both convinced that this is just the start of great things.“Professionalism has changed what rugby is, has killed the spirit,” said Fitschen, speaking to Planet Rugby. “Teams pitch up, earn their wages, and then disappear in sponsored cars to do their own thing. The first team of a club is never an ambassadorial body any more.”The tournament’s motto – For the Love of Rugby – proclaims their intention to kick ruthless ambition into touch and to revive that spirit. “This is the gap in the current rugby climate,” said Fitchen. “If a player ends up unable to play, or does not aspire to play professionally, there should be more of this on offer.”Everyone is welcomeBut the informality of the tournament doesn’t mean that any old standard will be accepted. “We won’t turn anyone away,” said Lindermann, “but this is not really a tournament for old crock teams. This is a tournament for young-ish people who would be of active professional playing age, but are not of that aptitude.” He added that while old crocks are still more than welcome, they may find themselves up against 15 teenagers.Former Springbok captain Corné Krige has thrown his considerable weight behind the event, saying, “The majority of rugby isn’t played at first team or provincial level. For these guys rugby isn’t a job, it’s a passion. Every weekend, for no payment or stadiums filled with 40 000 cheering fans, these okes [chaps] go out there and give it their all, just because they love the game.”Engaging with communitiesNot only will the tournament attract a multitude of visitors to Cape Town – recognised as one of the world’s premier destinations – but there is an outreach programme which will give teams the chance to engage with local communities by hosting coaching clinics for enthusiastic youngsters. They will also visit the Learn to Earn initiative, which has partnered with black economic empowerment company Tag Rugby Promotions by providing skilled graduates from its sewing programme to manufacture Tag Rugby products.And of course, visitors will not leave South Africa without experiencing two of the region’s prime attractions – the winelands and the spectacular Cape Peninsula – courtesy of the organisers, who have put together a few interesting tours to ensure that fans and players get the most from their visit.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view ite-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Useful linksSocial Rugby World CupOfficial SA rugby siteSA RugbyLearn to EarnTag RugbyBeer and Rugbylast_img read more

Research reveals Kenyan, Nigerian views of South Africa

first_imgThe skyline of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya. Brand South Africa’s field survey suggests Kenyans perceive South Africans to be imposing and aggressive. • Buy local to build South Africa’s economy• Stalled on the Trans-Africa Highway• National Development Plan: Utopian dream, practical blueprint• Want to grow Africa’s economy? Include women• Africa’s growth can stabilise world economyRay MaotaPerceptions of South Africa and its people can hinder or advance the country’s business progress in the rest of Africa. This was one of the insights gained from Brand South Africa fieldwork and other research in Kenya and Nigeria.The project, South Africa Incorporated or SA Inc, was created by Brand South Africa as part of its Africa Programme in order to uncover what local businesses face when trading with and investing in peer countries on the rest of the continent, and travelling to and living there.Dr Petrus de Kock, research manager at Brand South Africa, broke down the research report findings at the organisation’s Johannesburg offices on 18 September, at a roundtable discussion with representatives from South African companies doing business elsewhere in Africa.“One of the most surprising findings, to be explored in more detail in a subsequent report, pertains to South Africa’s creative industries particularly music, broadly the entertainment, and film and video production capabilities,” De Kock said. “The latter speaks to a strong people and cultural profile in Kenya and Nigeria that create a basis for sustained and expanded cultural contact.”SA Inc aims to uncover unique insights to help the organisation understand the environment in which Brand South Africa operates. For example, initial findings indicate personal interactions in business, social and government settings, De Kock said, often leave the impression among hosts in other African countries that South Africans are pushy, imposing and unwilling to listen to the authentic advice of locals and industry experts.The National Development Plan, which sets out the vision for the South Africa of the year 2013, posits expanded trade between South Africa and its peer African countries as a key long-term objective.“Since 1994 South Africa moved from being a pariah state,” De Kock said, “to becoming a key investor in and trade partner to the rest of Africa, as well as a holiday, shopping, entertainment and higher education destination. From a reputation, positioning and nation brand point of view, this project aims to fill some gaps in the national understanding of its profile in, exposure to, and range of interactions with the African environment.“This implies that whether South Africa wants to expand into peer African markets, or whether it wants to attract more investment or trade opportunities from those markets into South Africa, the fact remains that deeper insight is needed into threats, opportunities, strengths and weaknesses of the nation brand in peer markets.”The nation brand and South AfricaAccording to the report, a nation brand is fundamentally different from corporate brands. Although certain corporate brands may have multiple sub-brands, or a wide variety of component parts that feed into and support the “mother brand”, a nation brand encompasses a dizzying array of attributes, as well as factors that impact on the performance, reputation, and competitiveness of the brand.“For this reason Brand South Africa approaches the nation brand as a composite construct that aims to present a coherent image and country message to domestic and international audiences,” De Kock said. “This image and message is drawn from a vast pool of indicators, attributes, and unique cultural and economic features of the nation.”He added that a nation brand encompasses all the attributes, strengths and innovations a nation offers the world, in all its spheres of activity. These include business, arts, music, theatre, film, tourism, science and innovation, infrastructure, manufacturing, and governance.According to the 2013 Brand Finance Nation Brand report, which rates and ranks the brands of different countries, the total value of South Africa’s nation brand rose from US$222-billion in 2012 to $270-billion in 2013 – a significant increase.African Nation Brand RankingsCountryRankingBrand valueSouth Africa32$270-billionNigeria49$111-billionEgypt54$70-billionMorocco67$40-billionGhana80$20-billionKenya81$19-billionEthiopia86$14-billionTanzania88$14-billionUganda94$10-billionBotswana97$9-billionZambia99$8-billionFindings on South Africa’s footprint in Kenya and NigeriaUncovering outside perceptions of a nation are key to effectively marketing its brand, particularly for encouraging trade and investment. In July and August 2014 Brand South Africa researchers conducted fieldwork in Kenya and Nigeria to assess other African countries’ views of South Africa and its people.This revealed that Kenyans largely consider South Africans to be imposing and aggressive.“However, at the opposite end, the country and its people’s general openness is ascribed to an appealing culture and high level accomplishments in several spheres,” De Kock said. “For example, our political transition and democratisation; the capabilities and range of sectors in the South African economy; South African technical, managerial, manufacturing, engineering, and a host of related practical capabilities – these all impact positively on perceptions of the nation brand.”For example, Kenya revealed a positive reception of South African products and services, mostly in the food sector, as they are competitively priced and of high quality.According to the report, these perceptions stem from comments on how South African managers conduct themselves and treat Kenyans. This impacts on the reputation of South Africa and South African businesses in Kenya.On the other hand, South African companies’ perceptions of doing business in Kenya are characterised by wariness, a result of several failed attempts to invest in the nation.Perceptions of business and economic ties in Nigeria conclude that while South Africa has significant and diverse investments across a range of sectors in that country, Nigerian business people feel South Africa should be more open to investment from, and trade interaction with, Nigerian companies.Conclusions of reportThe initial fieldwork findings indicate unique nation brand reputational strengths in areas such as culture, music, business sophistication, infrastructure and political management of democratic transitions.On the negative side, South Africans are perceived as imposing, aggressive, and unwilling to listen to local advice.“From a business perspective it implies that more attention needs to be paid to the manner in which South Africans interact with African peers, and how market entry strategies are designed by incorporating soft factors such as business culture,” De Kock said.From a political point of view South Africa is seen as progressive, that it has strong institutions, and democratic credentials to underpin its constitution. However, internal developmental challenges, xenophobia, and misplaced perceptions about African expats in South Africa is a cause for concern in Kenya and Nigeria.last_img read more

South African business encouraged to give more at conference

first_imgMelissa JavanBrand South Africa board chairperson Khanyisile Kweyama challenged business leaders to go above and beyond to change society for the better. Speaking at the 2016 In Good Company conference at the Atterbury Theatre in Pretoria on 30 August, Kweyama said: “It’s only when we create sustainable, durable solutions that we overcome challenges.”Sustainable change can be achieved, she argued, when companies are more creative and are courageous in the way it allocates corporate social investment (CSI) budgets. Far too often companies look at CSI as charitable spending rather than funds that can make real change. “CSI programmes can be invested in growing the country.”Why is enterprise and skills development not funded more often through CSI programmes, she questioned.She urged corporate leaders to show the way forward by being courageous, tenacious and resilient. “Let’s improve the social conditions and build a strong nation brand.”Create sustainable solutionsIn Good Company is part of an ongoing initiative run by Nation Builder, the conference organisers. Nation Builder helps companies channel it’s CSI into initiatives to make the most sustainable change in South Africa. Founded by the Muthobi Foundation, Nation Builder is a community of businesses and individuals dedicated to changing their communities through action.Keri Paschal, executive director of the Muthobi Foundation and trustee of Nation Builder, said it can be achieved “through the sharing of practice, lessons learned and the development of collaborative tools to equip all of us to achieve better results in our Good Giving, both individually and within our business.”Paschal explained that they have benchmarked charities and created tools and resources that help businesses gauge the success of their CSI projects.Research conducted by Nation Builder Trust has found that R8.1-billion is channelled annually through CSI budgets. It is estimated that that investment, if spent wisely, could generate R25-billion worth of economic activity.Informal traders, the invisible matrixGG Marc Alcock, author of Third World Child and KasiNomics, used the novelty of food trucks (entrepreneurial businesses that can generate between R25 000 and R100 000 a month) to explain how the country’s informal traders are contributing to the economy.When he noticed that employees were willing to spend R35 for a meal from a food truck when meals at the staff canteen were cheaper, he wondered why.“The food truck’s food doesn’t stay overnight. It is fresh,” was the answer.It gave Alcock important insight: businesses need to look at unique ways of meeting needs. It was the same with hawkers selling fruit and vegetables – customers bought it because it was fresh.“What about your neighbour being your competition?” Alcock asked the hawkers who sell the same products but sit next to each other. One answered: “I have my own customers, just like she [the neighbour] has her own.” Alcock said it showed that relationships are important in business.The value of spaza shops and spazarettesAlcock said that South Africa’s economy is being sustained by the informal sector. “We need to recognise the role the informal sector plays.”For example, there are 70 000 spaza shops, defined as a hole in the wall shop that sells basic necessities to customers, each could generate between R30 000 and R80 000 per month turnover. A spazarette is just a bigger version of a spaza shop, where customers buy weekly goods.He added: “Although they are below the tax bracket in terms of their profit, they pay VAT anyway when they buy their goods.”Alcock said the informal sector helps the unemployed earn a living. “We [as corporates] need to enhance, and support these businesses.“They are the invisible economic matrix, their businesses surround us, but we don’t see them.”Other speakers included Mike Schussler, director of Economists.co.za, and Francois van Niekerk, founder of the Mertech group and co-founder of Atterbury properties. Van Niekerk spoke about the marriage between business and purpose, while Schussler’s talk was titled We ignore the good news about South Africa at our peril.Conference host and actor Eric Miyeni said CSI should begin the day you start your business. “Most people think CSI is outside. You can start with your first employee, your first partner or yourself.“CSI is about being good to your fellow citizen.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using SouthAfrica.info materiallast_img read more

South Africa’s Top 50 Most Valuable Brands

first_imgSouth Africa’s Top 50 Most Valuable Brands have been revealed and the competitiveness of the business sphere highlights a key component of a strong nation brand.Jeremy Sampson, newly appointed director of Brand Finance (Far left) with the representative of FNB, who came 6th in this year’s Top 50 Most Valuable Brands, along with Thebe Ikalafeng,chairman of Brand Finance, and Kingsley Makhubela, CEO of Brand South Africa.  (Image: Brand South Africa)Ray MaotaAfter a year of indepth analysis and tough calculations, South Africa’s Top 50 Most Valuable Brands have been announced. Together they are the leading brands that make the nation proud.The announcement was made at the Nelson Mandela Foundation in Houghton in Johannesburg on 15 September 2016, through a partnership between Brand South Africa and Brand Finance, a leading brand valuation and strategy consultancy.The total value of the Top 50 brands increased 3% from R373-billion to R384-billion compared with 2015. Excluding MTN’s drop in brand value of R17-billion, the remaining 49 brands had a total value of R347-billion in 2016, growing 9% from R319-billion in 2015.“South African commercial brands are a key component of a strong nation brand and how this is experienced by both domestic and international audiences,” said Kingsley Makhubela, CEO of Brand South Africa. “As such commercial brands are key messengers in positioning the country competitively.“At the same time, we express our appreciation to all other corporate brands in the country for your contribution to the growth and development of South Africa. We thank you for playing your part and look forward to honouring you among the Top 50 in years to come.”Cellphone service provider MTN retains its number one spot this year, remaining the most valuable brand despite losing 32% of its brand value as a result of some of its reputational challenges. Woolworths holds the strongest brand position with an increase of 21% in brand value.Telkom posted the greatest increase in brand value following the integration of Business Connexion and improved performance on its retail side, with good ratings on value for money and customer satisfaction, according to the South African Customer Satisfaction Index. The increase in brand value caused Telkom to move from 23rd position in 2015 to 17th in 2016.“The more competitive the market, the more important it is to have a strong brand, leverage it to its full potential and measured and monitored at all times,” said Jeremy Sampson, newly appointed director of Brand Finance. “Brands are increasingly the major assets of companies, yet does anyone have an idea of their true value? Marketing is no longer a nice-to-have, it can be the difference between success and failure.”The Top 50The story of the Top 50 corporate brands was a good story for the South Africa nation brand as well as the continental story, said Thebe Ikalafeng, chairman of Brand Finance. “Many of these brands have footprints on the continent and this bodes well for perceptions about business on the continent, their ethics, governance and commitment to social upliftment.“Brand Finance salutes the Top 50 corporate brands for their excellence in flying the South Africa and African flags.”Many of the Top 10 brands from 2015 retained their positions in 2016. Exceptions were retailer Woolworths, which moved to fifth place, and bank Absa, which moved to seventh place.The top 10 brands, from one to 10, are: MTN, Vodacom, Sasol, Standard Bank, Woolworths, FNB, Absa, Nedbank, Investec and Mediclinic.Brands with a significant increase in value include Investec (27%) and WesBank (27%). Two new brands entered the Top 50. Clothing label Country Road, now owned by Woolworths, entered at 31st place with a value of R4.64-billion, and listed real estate investment trustGrowthpoint Properties entered at 50 with a value of R1.47-billion.SABMiller holds the most valuable portfolio, amounting to R29.67-billion, with four of its brands standing among the country’s top 50: Castle, Carling Black Label, Hansa Pilsner and SABMiller.SABMiller is followed by FirstRand, with its three brands – FNB, WesBank and Rand Merchant Bank – collectively valued at R23.12-billion.The rest of the brands in the Top 50, from 11 to 50 are: Multichoice, Shoprite; Castle, Mondi, Spar, Carling Black Label, Telkom, Old Mutual, Pick n Pay, Netcare, Sanlam, Discovery, Hansa Pilsner, MrP, Sappi, WesBank, Media 24, Liberty Holdings, Truworths, Bidvest, Country Road, Capitec, SABMiller, Steinhoff, Clicks, Huletts, Momentum, Makro, Checkers, Rainbow; Rand Merchant Bank, Santam, SAA, Life Healthcare, Imperial, Foschini, Cell C, Game, Nampak, and Growthpoint Properties.MethodologyBrand Finance calculates the values of the brands in its league tables using the Royalty Relief approach. This approach involves estimating the likely future sales that are attributable to a brand and calculating a royalty rate that would be charged for the use of the brand, i.e. what the owner would have to pay for the use of the brand – assuming it was not already owned.The steps in this process are:• Calculate brand strength on a scale of 0 to 100 based on a number of attributes, such as emotional connection, financial performance and sustainability, among others. This score is known as the Brand Strength Index.• Determine the royalty rate range for the respective brand sectors. This is done by reviewing comparable licensing agreements sourced from Brand Finance’s extensive database of licence agreements and other online databases.• Calculate royalty rate. The brand strength score is applied to the royalty rate range to arrive at a royalty rate. For example, if the royalty rate range in a brand’s sector is 0-5% and a brand has a brand strength score of 80 out of 100, then an appropriate royalty rate for the use of this brand in the given sector will be 4%.• Determine brand specific revenues estimating a proportion of parent company revenues attributable to a specific brand.• Determine forecast brand specific revenues using a function of historic revenues, equity analyst forecasts and economic growth rates.• Apply the royalty rate to the forecast revenues to derive brand revenues.• Brand revenues are discounted after tax to a net present value that equals the brand value.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Do the Work You Are Capable Of

first_imgOne summer I was invited to work for the husband of a family friend. The job was mindless, something anyone could do. It was also repetitive and mindless. But the pay was pretty good for a teenage kid, and I needed the money.I worked harder than anyone around me. I also worked faster than anyone around me. I was doubling and tripling the output of the full time employees, and it was not going unnoticed. The managers and supervisors were impressed, and they praised my work, even though I did not believe there was anything exceptional to what I was doing.At break, a number of the full time employees cornered me. They told me to slow down to the pace of the rest of the workers there. They told me that I was making them look bad, and that they were being paid for that level of production, so they weren’t going to work any harder.I was too young to know how to handle it, and I was intimidated by a group of much older people cornering me to insist I slow down. So, I ended up finding a way to work by myself, and at my own pace.Up until this point, I wasn’t aware that this mindset existed.Here’s the thing. When you do only the minimum work you are capable of, you will only be paid the minimum amount commensurate with that work. Withholding the real value you can create only ensures that you are never earn what you are capable of earning.The full time employees believed they were punishing the company by producing less than they were capable of, but in reality, they were taking money out of their pockets.A poor mindset leads to poor activities and poor results. Do the work you are capable of. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Wife, paramour held for man’s murder in Ganjam

first_imgThe Ganjam police has solved the murder of a man whose body parts were recovered from different areas with the arrest of his wife and her lover on Saturday.According to the police, Rina Sahu (35), wife of Koko Sahu (40), had committed the murder with with help of her paramour Sunil Pradhan on March 31. One of their sons was the witness to the murder, police sources said. Sunil is a distant relative of Rina.A torso was recovered near Mardarajpur on April 2. During the next few days, chopped hands and legs were located from nearby areas. On April 10, a severed head was found near the Dengapadar canal. As there was no missing person complaint, the local police were unable to identify the victim. The victim was finally identified when his brother Golak Sahu filed a complaint with the police regarding his missing brother. The police had taken Rina into custody on May 10 for interrogation. During interrogation, she spilled the tbeans about the gruesome murder, which led to the arrest of her paramour.Illicit relationshipAccording to Sub-Divisional Police Officer (SDPO) Dilip Das, who monitored investigation of the case, Rina had developed relationship with Sunil as her husband was a migrant worker in Surat. After returning home in March, her husband had come to know about their illicit relationship and warned them to refrain from it. It had irked Rina and Sunil, who had decided to murder Koko.Another caseEarlier this month a similar case had come to fore in Ganjam district. Decomposed body of Laxmi Narayan Patra (38) from Mohana of Gajapati district was recovered from a locked rented house at Ankushpur village on May 4. Investigation revealed that he had been murdered on April 7 by his wife Jamuna Patra and her paramour Narayan Sahu. Both of them have been arrested.last_img read more

Asian Cup: Stephan Schrock scores historic goal but PH Azkals bow out

first_imgTS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening Photo from AFC CupDUBAI – A promising campaign ended in heartbreak for the Philippines as the Azkals suffered a 3-1 defeat to Kyrgyzstan last Wednesday night that ended their hopes of reaching the next round of the AFC Asian Cup at Rashid Stadium here.Stephan Schrock scored a historic first goal for the country in the competition second half but it turned out to be a late consolation for the Azkals whose campaign started on a positive note with a fighting performance in the 0-1 defeat to South Korea.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ US defense chief agrees it’s time to take another look at defense pact with PH PLAY LIST 01:46US defense chief agrees it’s time to take another look at defense pact with PH02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte LATEST STORIES LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Vitalij Lux’s hattrick ensured maximum points for Kyrgyzstan which is in a strong position to reach the next round.The Azkals entered the match brimming with confidence especially after a win would have given them an opportunity to advance.But Kyrgyzstan put the Azkals under pressure right from the start with Michael Falkesgaard needing to come up with a couple of big saves early before Vitalij struck to open the scoring in the 23rd minute.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsVitalij rifled home another quality finish six minutes into the second half, before grabbing his hattrick by firing into an empty net.Schrock’s free kick gave the Filipino gallery something to cheer about in the 81st minute and another chance for the Azkals to trim the deficit went begging moments later when Patrick Reichelt lashed his effort wide. Report: Turkey seeks warrant for Knicks’ Enes Kanter SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion View commentslast_img read more