Do the Work You Are Capable Of

first_imgOne summer I was invited to work for the husband of a family friend. The job was mindless, something anyone could do. It was also repetitive and mindless. But the pay was pretty good for a teenage kid, and I needed the money.I worked harder than anyone around me. I also worked faster than anyone around me. I was doubling and tripling the output of the full time employees, and it was not going unnoticed. The managers and supervisors were impressed, and they praised my work, even though I did not believe there was anything exceptional to what I was doing.At break, a number of the full time employees cornered me. They told me to slow down to the pace of the rest of the workers there. They told me that I was making them look bad, and that they were being paid for that level of production, so they weren’t going to work any harder.I was too young to know how to handle it, and I was intimidated by a group of much older people cornering me to insist I slow down. So, I ended up finding a way to work by myself, and at my own pace.Up until this point, I wasn’t aware that this mindset existed.Here’s the thing. When you do only the minimum work you are capable of, you will only be paid the minimum amount commensurate with that work. Withholding the real value you can create only ensures that you are never earn what you are capable of earning.The full time employees believed they were punishing the company by producing less than they were capable of, but in reality, they were taking money out of their pockets.A poor mindset leads to poor activities and poor results. Do the work you are capable of. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Sajad Lone’s party to contest J&K polls

first_imgSajad Lone’s Peoples Conference on Friday became the first regional party to announce its participation in the coming urban local bodies and panchayat polls in J&K. “The Peoples Conference will take part in the upcoming elections. But given the rules, we won’t have a common symbol,” he tweeted.BJP allyMr. Lone became an ally of the BJP after the 2014 polls and served as a Minister with portfolios of Animal Husbandry, Social Welfare and Renewable Energy.Unlike the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) and the National Conference, Mr. Lone, son of assassinated Hurriyat leader Abdul Ghani Lone, maintained a studied silence on the issues of Article 35A, which defines State-subject laws, and the special status of J&K. The PDP and the NC boycotted the polls accusing the Centre of linking Article 35A with upcoming polls before the Supreme Court, which is hearing a number of petitions challenging the Article.The CPI(M), the JD(U), the BSP, the Awami National Party and the Democratic Party Nationalist also decided to stay away from these elections. So far, the Congress and the BJP have decided to field candidates in the polls, which will start from October 8 for urban local bodies.last_img read more

Communal divide to the fore in Asansol

first_imgFor a city with a centuries-old history of mining coal and producing steel, a gate at the entrance to Asansol, describing it as the “City of Brotherhood”, was scarcely noticed by residents and passers-by until a few years ago. However, after March 2018, the message put up by the city’s civic body is not only hard to miss but also presents the paradox the city is grappling with.In March 2018, Asansol burnt in hatred. Over 26 years after the city witnessed a divide along communal lines post-Babri Masjid demolition, the city appeared to be divided again. People were killed and prohibitory orders remained imposed for weeks as riots broke out over processions during Ram Navami. As the constituency gears up for polls on April 29, 2019, the fault lines of the communal divide seem more pronounced.Days before the polls, Trinamool Congress nominee Sreemati Dev Varma (Moon Moon Sen) had several events lined up earlier this week on Monday. At a crossing on the Domohani Road in Ward No. 31 of the Asansol Municipal Corporation, the 65-year-old actor made a brief speech to a crowd of a few hundred, largely comprising women and children.“The sound of azan from your mosque is the same as that of shlokas from the Gita,” she began. “Will you vote for those who want to divide us,” she asked in an apparent reference to the BJP.Ms. Sen, who represented Bankura Lok Sabha seat in 2014, had no hesitation in telling the audience that she is not familiar with Asansol and was contesting as per the wishes of her party chief and West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee. Her speech was replete with references to her mother, Bengali screen legend Suchitra Sen. Asked about her chances here, Ms. Sen’s reply reflected the wit of a politician: “Ask me what are the chances of Mamata Banerjee becoming Prime Minister and I will tell you its cent per cent.”Challenges galore The arithmetic of the last Assembly polls, held three years ago, may be with the TMC — it had won five of the seven seats in the Asansol LS constituency. But there are other challenges for the party. A TMC MP from Kolkata admitted that prime among them was of keeping the party’s flock together. This was one of the reasons why an outsider was given the ticket.Defending the seat is Union Minister of State Babul Supriyo. The singer-turned-politician’s greatest weapon this election is a song that has already courted a lot of controversy. Beyond the open coal mines of Raniganj where people can be seen carrying coal — mostly smuggled from the mines — on bicycles and their heads under the scorching sun, Mr. Supriyo is in the midst of a very busy campaign. As his convoy passes through Pandabeshwar, his supporters distribute booklets on the work he has done in the past five years, with his song playing in the background. Refuting the Election Commission’s reservations about the song, Mr. Supriyo expressed happiness at the over one lakh views it had notched on the Internet. “Why will you vote for Moon Moon Sen who is asking for votes in the name of her dead mother? What about the living and their problems?” he told a small gathering. While reminding people to play his song, the MP also raised slogans of ‘Jai Shri Ram’ during his campaign.Corruption from coal and freedom to allow religious processions found echoes in the words of Prime Minister Narendra Modi when he addressed the public meeting at Polo Grounds in Asansol the very next day (Tuesday). Just on the other side of the railway tracks, where the Prime Minister addressed the public meeting, Noorani Masjid and its adjoining areas still bear the scars of last year’s violence. “There was an unfortunate incident last year. What happened then should not recur any time in the future,” said Maulana Imdadullah Rashidi, referring to the riots. The cleric’s 16-year-old son was killed in the riots but he defused the situation with love, threatening to leave the city if members of the community targeted others.Another flare-upEarlier this month, a communal flare-up was also reported at Barakat in Asansol over a Ram Navami procession when authorities had to intervene, make arrests and suspend Internet services in the area. Imam Rashidi tried to downplay the incident. “There were some rumours in Barakat. Everything is quiet now. Elections will come and go. Asansol needs to, and will return to, where it was before 2018,” he said, his voice reflecting the same sanity and reason he had put forth a year ago.For Imam Rashidi, Asansol is really the city of brotherhood. “We are brothers living together here for centuries. Those who are used to hate will never realise what brotherhood means,” he said.last_img read more

Its disheartening Teepees start to come down at Saskatchewan legislature

first_imgREGINA – Teepees came down at an Indigenous protest camp on the grounds of the Saskatchewan legislature on Monday, and protesters say more will be brought down on Tuesday.The Saskatchewan Coalition Against Racism said in an email late Monday that teepees would be coming down throughout the day Tuesday, and there would be a round dance for supporters and campers at sunset.On Friday, a judge ordered that the Justice For Our Stolen Children Camp be dismantled after the government applied for a court-ordered eviction.The campers have been protesting racial injustice and the disproportionate number of Indigenous children in care since late February.There had been 15 teepees in the camp at one point, but that number was down to 10 by Monday morning. At least two of the teepees came down after the court order, while others were taken down for the annual Treaty 4 Gathering taking place in Fort Qu’Appelle, Sask., this week.Regina police spokeswoman Elizabeth Popowich said in an email earlier Monday that the department had been in talks with the province and protesters, and Chief Evan Bray “expects a resolution in the near future.”No deadline was specified in Justice Ysanne Wilkinson’s order to take the camp down.Protester Richelle Dubois said Monday it was “disheartening” to see the number of teepees shrink.“It shows the province’s true colours and how they feel about First Nation children and communities,” she said.Robyn Pitawanakwat, a spokeswoman for the camp, said earlier in the day that protesters were still undecided about where to go from here, and they held several meetings over the weekend to discuss their options.“We’re hopeful — hopeful that there’s still a future for our cause and there’s still a future for our children,” Dubois said.Lawyer Dan LeBlanc, who represents the protesters, wasn’t immediately available for comment. A spokesperson for the provincial government declined to comment further on the future of the camp.Pitawanakwat said spirits have been good at the camp and people have been united since the court order. She said the focus should be on the issues they’ve brought forward, rather than bylaws and permissions.— Follow @RyanBMcKenna on Twitterlast_img read more