ALWAYS FIRST WITH THE GOOD NEWS: 75 NEW JOBS ANNOUNCED FOR LETTERKENNY

first_imgLETTERKENNY has been given a much-needed jobs boost with the announcement of 75 new jobs for the town.The South Carolina-headquartered company is to invest in a 40,000 sq ft expansion of its Lisnennan facility.The investment is supported by the Government via IDA Ireland. Zeus Industrial Products is a developer and manufacturer of precision polymer extrusions, including specialist fluropolymer tubing solutions, for a range of industries.Established in 1966, the company is privately held by the original founder Frank P Tourville and employs 1,200 people worldwide. The company established operations in Ireland in 2005.“Our experience of doing business in Ireland has been a positive one,” said the company’s general manager for Ireland Séamus Hughes.He said the decision to expand its operations here was due to growth in its customer base in Europe. “We are very excited about our expansion plans and I look forward to finding the right calibre of staff to ensure our continued success here,” Mr Hughes added.EndsFirst posted: 13.00 Thursday Dec 16th: Updated 10.00 FridayALWAYS FIRST WITH THE GOOD NEWS: 75 NEW JOBS ANNOUNCED FOR LETTERKENNY was last modified: December 17th, 2010 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Spartans, Lady Spartans named to all league teams

first_imgRed Bluff >> Three softball and five baseball players were selected by league coaches to be members of the Eastern Athletic and Sacramento River All League teams.Senior Allyson Drury was selected at second base for the softball team. On the baseball team, Spartans second baseman Payton Edwards was selected as an infielder, Austin Youngblood as an outfielder, Tanner Tweedt at catcher and Kolby Button at pitcher. Button, Edwards and Youngblood are seniors, Tweedt a junior.Honorable mentions …last_img

Press Goes Ape Over Baby Lucy

first_imgThe news media, especially National Geographic, BBC News, and Associated Press (see Fox News) have new fodder for human-evolution stories and artwork, now that a partial skeleton of Australopithecus afarensis has been reported in Nature.1  The teeth, cranium, shoulder blades, fingers, inner ear, hyoid bone and other well-preserved parts match “typical African ape morphology.”  This is not a new discovery.  The research team has been gently extracting the pieces of bone from cemented sandstone for five years.  They submitted their initial paper in for publication in April, but estimate it will take several more years to extract remaining fragments from the matrix.    Based on tooth morphology, they estimate this specimen to have been a 3-year old female.  Because of the species affinity with “Lucy” (though found some 10 km from Johanson’s famous fossil), some are nicknaming this skeleton “Lucy’s baby” (but the discoverers have nicknamed her Salem, “peace”).  The skeleton from the waist up is very ape-like, indicating a life in the trees, they claim.  Though more complete than previous A. afarensis fossils, it lacks the pelvis; only a foot, pieces of leg bones, kneecaps “as small as a dried pea” provide anatomists with evidence to claim she walked upright – one of the most contentious parts of the debate over the older Lucy fossil.    The authors indicated that several parts of the skeleton have been distorted in the burial process: “The cranium is intact except for parts of the frontal squama and significant parts of both parietals, which have broken away to reveal the complete natural brain endocast (Fig. 1d),” the paper states.  “The back of the calvaria is slightly distorted, pushing the nuchal region forward (Fig. 1f).”  Later, “The articulated postcranial elements in the primary sandstone block include both scapulae and clavicles, the cervical, thoracic and the first two lumbar vertebrae, and many ribs.  They are displaced from their original anatomical positions, and are compressed superiorly under the cranial base and the palate, making preparation difficult (Fig. 1b, c).”  The scientific papers, furthermore, tend to be less dogmatic than the press releases.  The authors only say that this skeleton resembles Lucy, and are tentative about the age, which the popular press state confidently as 3 years old.  Furthermore, the authors understand that interpretations of life habits based on bones is not an exact science:Now that the scapula of this species can be examined in full for the first time, it is unexpected to find the strongest similarities with Gorilla, an animal in which weight-bearing and terrestrial knuckle-walking predominately characterize locomotor use of the forelimbs.  Problematic in the interpretation of these findings is that the diversity of scapula architecture among hominoid species is poorly understood from a functional perspective.Most surprising, this specimen was apparently buried suddenly in a watery flood along with many other animals:This depositional setting, combined with the remarkable preservation of many articulated faunal remains lacking evidence of preburial weathering, most likely indicates that the juvenile hominin was buried as an intact corpse shortly after death during a major flood event.This is echoed by Wynn et al. who, in the same issue of Nature,2 described the geological setting of the fossil:This depositional setting, combined with the remarkable preservation of many articulated faunal remains lacking evidence of preburial weathering, most probably indicates rapid deposition during major flood events, burying many fossils as intact corpses (including the juvenile hominin).In the vicinity of the skeleton were found bones of catfish, mouse, rat, monkey, baboon, mongoose, elephant, extinct horse, rhino, hippo, pig, bushbuck, giraffe, antelope, impala, gazelle, crocodile, coral snake, tortoise, and other animals.    In the same issue of Nature,3 Bernard Wood called Lucy’s baby “a precious little bundle.”  He agrees, “The corpse of the infant was buried more or less intact, and the sediment in flood waters must have swiftly covered it.”  As to this species’ ability to walk upright, Wood is equivocal:There remains a great deal of controversy regarding the posture and locomotion of A. afarensis.  Most researchers accept that it could stand upright and walk on two feet, but whether it could climb up and move through trees is still disputed.  Some suggest that its adaptations to walking on two feet preclude any significant arboreal locomotion, and interpret any limb features that support such locomotion as evolutionary baggage without any useful function.  Others suggest that a primitive limb morphology would not have persisted unless it served a purpose.Wood leaves any complete understanding to the future.  After exploring several questions this fossil opens, he ended, “Whatever the answers to such questions, the Dikika infant has the potential to provide a wealth of information about the growth and development, function and taxonomy of A. afarensis.”  He told Associated Press that this find won’t settle the debate among scientists, which he said “makes the Middle East look like a picnic.”  National Geographic, though, was all ready with artwork, videos and special features about Lucy on the day of the announcement, and Scientific American went all-out with a special feature, including a clickable diagram of each bone fragment.  On the other hand, Carl Wieland, a creationist with Creation Ministries International, considers this good news.  The more complete skeleton confirms what critics have alleged for years, that Lucy was a tree-climbing, knuckle-walking ape that did not walk upright.1Alemseged et al., “A juvenile early hominin skeleton from Dikika, Ethiopia,” Nature 443, 296-301(21 September 2006) | doi:10.1038/nature05047; Received 22 April 2006; Accepted 6 July 2006.2Wynn et al., “Geological and palaeontological context of a Pliocene juvenile hominin at Dikika, Ethiopia,” Nature 443, 332-336(21 September 2006) | doi:10.1038/nature05048; Received 24 April 2006; Accepted 6 July 2006.3Bernard Wood, “Palaeoanthropology: A precious little bundle,” Nature 278-281(21 September 2006) | doi:10.1038/443278a; Published online 20 September 2006.When you scrape away the hype and artistic license, most of the details of the actual bones seem to back up criticisms by creationists that this is nothing more than an extinct ape.  The only portions of the skeleton that evolutionists use to claim this creature had something to do with human evolution are the least preserved: the leg and foot bones.  They interpret these to mean it walked upright, as if walking upright is the main human distinctive.  The best-preserved parts of the skeleton, by contrast, are clearly ape-like and argue against this extinct ape being a walker.  Read the articles skeptically, without assuming what the evolutionists assume, and the evidence is profoundly unconvincing for the claims made about it.  Everything from the backbone up is well within the charts for an ape, not a human wannabee.  The paleontologists admitted, also, that the skeleton has been deformed; how does that affect the interpretation, when assessing function from structure is “poorly understood” under the best of conditions?    This fossil also creates other problems for the evolutionists.  Consider, for instance, how the evidence for arboreal (tree-climbing) behavior, based on the fingers and shoulder blades, scrambles the Lucy story: “The foot and other evidence from the lower limb provide clear evidence for bipedal locomotion [sic], but the gorilla-like scapula and long and curved manual phalanges raise new questions about the importance of arboreal behaviour in the A. afarensis locomotor repertoire.”  This means that evolutionists must now either consider the tree-climbing equipment as “evolutionary baggage” or believe that this creature climbed trees half the time and walked upright the other half.  (Only human boys exhibit this behavior today, but they quickly grow out of it.)  If Darwin’s mechanism could produce instant phyla at the Cambrian, why couldn’t it get rid of its baggage just as quickly?  On the other hand, if Baby Lucy was happy in the treetops, why was there evolutionary pressure to make her strut on the ground, when other primates found buried with her did not feel the same pressure?  And how can minorities endure the racism implicit in the artwork (see Yahoo) that always shows these alleged primitives with dark skin?    The Darwin Party baby shower for Salem is, therefore, highly overblown, as is usual for human-evolution celebrations.  They don’t seem to be focusing quite as much on the remarkable collection of animals buried with the little she-ape.  If a sudden flood of this magnitude occurred today, burying this many animals in the same graveyard all at once, wouldn’t it be international news?  This was not a volcanic landslide; it was a watery catastrophe.  Notice how much the media are going out of their way to characterize this ape as a child and a baby when they won’t even afford that dignity to a human embryo.  It is time to get rid of the evolutionary baggage and discover the real Peace Child.(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Do the Work You Are Capable Of

first_imgOne summer I was invited to work for the husband of a family friend. The job was mindless, something anyone could do. It was also repetitive and mindless. But the pay was pretty good for a teenage kid, and I needed the money.I worked harder than anyone around me. I also worked faster than anyone around me. I was doubling and tripling the output of the full time employees, and it was not going unnoticed. The managers and supervisors were impressed, and they praised my work, even though I did not believe there was anything exceptional to what I was doing.At break, a number of the full time employees cornered me. They told me to slow down to the pace of the rest of the workers there. They told me that I was making them look bad, and that they were being paid for that level of production, so they weren’t going to work any harder.I was too young to know how to handle it, and I was intimidated by a group of much older people cornering me to insist I slow down. So, I ended up finding a way to work by myself, and at my own pace.Up until this point, I wasn’t aware that this mindset existed.Here’s the thing. When you do only the minimum work you are capable of, you will only be paid the minimum amount commensurate with that work. Withholding the real value you can create only ensures that you are never earn what you are capable of earning.The full time employees believed they were punishing the company by producing less than they were capable of, but in reality, they were taking money out of their pockets.A poor mindset leads to poor activities and poor results. Do the work you are capable of. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Sajad Lone’s party to contest J&K polls

first_imgSajad Lone’s Peoples Conference on Friday became the first regional party to announce its participation in the coming urban local bodies and panchayat polls in J&K. “The Peoples Conference will take part in the upcoming elections. But given the rules, we won’t have a common symbol,” he tweeted.BJP allyMr. Lone became an ally of the BJP after the 2014 polls and served as a Minister with portfolios of Animal Husbandry, Social Welfare and Renewable Energy.Unlike the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) and the National Conference, Mr. Lone, son of assassinated Hurriyat leader Abdul Ghani Lone, maintained a studied silence on the issues of Article 35A, which defines State-subject laws, and the special status of J&K. The PDP and the NC boycotted the polls accusing the Centre of linking Article 35A with upcoming polls before the Supreme Court, which is hearing a number of petitions challenging the Article.The CPI(M), the JD(U), the BSP, the Awami National Party and the Democratic Party Nationalist also decided to stay away from these elections. So far, the Congress and the BJP have decided to field candidates in the polls, which will start from October 8 for urban local bodies.last_img read more

Communal divide to the fore in Asansol

first_imgFor a city with a centuries-old history of mining coal and producing steel, a gate at the entrance to Asansol, describing it as the “City of Brotherhood”, was scarcely noticed by residents and passers-by until a few years ago. However, after March 2018, the message put up by the city’s civic body is not only hard to miss but also presents the paradox the city is grappling with.In March 2018, Asansol burnt in hatred. Over 26 years after the city witnessed a divide along communal lines post-Babri Masjid demolition, the city appeared to be divided again. People were killed and prohibitory orders remained imposed for weeks as riots broke out over processions during Ram Navami. As the constituency gears up for polls on April 29, 2019, the fault lines of the communal divide seem more pronounced.Days before the polls, Trinamool Congress nominee Sreemati Dev Varma (Moon Moon Sen) had several events lined up earlier this week on Monday. At a crossing on the Domohani Road in Ward No. 31 of the Asansol Municipal Corporation, the 65-year-old actor made a brief speech to a crowd of a few hundred, largely comprising women and children.“The sound of azan from your mosque is the same as that of shlokas from the Gita,” she began. “Will you vote for those who want to divide us,” she asked in an apparent reference to the BJP.Ms. Sen, who represented Bankura Lok Sabha seat in 2014, had no hesitation in telling the audience that she is not familiar with Asansol and was contesting as per the wishes of her party chief and West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee. Her speech was replete with references to her mother, Bengali screen legend Suchitra Sen. Asked about her chances here, Ms. Sen’s reply reflected the wit of a politician: “Ask me what are the chances of Mamata Banerjee becoming Prime Minister and I will tell you its cent per cent.”Challenges galore The arithmetic of the last Assembly polls, held three years ago, may be with the TMC — it had won five of the seven seats in the Asansol LS constituency. But there are other challenges for the party. A TMC MP from Kolkata admitted that prime among them was of keeping the party’s flock together. This was one of the reasons why an outsider was given the ticket.Defending the seat is Union Minister of State Babul Supriyo. The singer-turned-politician’s greatest weapon this election is a song that has already courted a lot of controversy. Beyond the open coal mines of Raniganj where people can be seen carrying coal — mostly smuggled from the mines — on bicycles and their heads under the scorching sun, Mr. Supriyo is in the midst of a very busy campaign. As his convoy passes through Pandabeshwar, his supporters distribute booklets on the work he has done in the past five years, with his song playing in the background. Refuting the Election Commission’s reservations about the song, Mr. Supriyo expressed happiness at the over one lakh views it had notched on the Internet. “Why will you vote for Moon Moon Sen who is asking for votes in the name of her dead mother? What about the living and their problems?” he told a small gathering. While reminding people to play his song, the MP also raised slogans of ‘Jai Shri Ram’ during his campaign.Corruption from coal and freedom to allow religious processions found echoes in the words of Prime Minister Narendra Modi when he addressed the public meeting at Polo Grounds in Asansol the very next day (Tuesday). Just on the other side of the railway tracks, where the Prime Minister addressed the public meeting, Noorani Masjid and its adjoining areas still bear the scars of last year’s violence. “There was an unfortunate incident last year. What happened then should not recur any time in the future,” said Maulana Imdadullah Rashidi, referring to the riots. The cleric’s 16-year-old son was killed in the riots but he defused the situation with love, threatening to leave the city if members of the community targeted others.Another flare-upEarlier this month, a communal flare-up was also reported at Barakat in Asansol over a Ram Navami procession when authorities had to intervene, make arrests and suspend Internet services in the area. Imam Rashidi tried to downplay the incident. “There were some rumours in Barakat. Everything is quiet now. Elections will come and go. Asansol needs to, and will return to, where it was before 2018,” he said, his voice reflecting the same sanity and reason he had put forth a year ago.For Imam Rashidi, Asansol is really the city of brotherhood. “We are brothers living together here for centuries. Those who are used to hate will never realise what brotherhood means,” he said.last_img read more

Its disheartening Teepees start to come down at Saskatchewan legislature

first_imgREGINA – Teepees came down at an Indigenous protest camp on the grounds of the Saskatchewan legislature on Monday, and protesters say more will be brought down on Tuesday.The Saskatchewan Coalition Against Racism said in an email late Monday that teepees would be coming down throughout the day Tuesday, and there would be a round dance for supporters and campers at sunset.On Friday, a judge ordered that the Justice For Our Stolen Children Camp be dismantled after the government applied for a court-ordered eviction.The campers have been protesting racial injustice and the disproportionate number of Indigenous children in care since late February.There had been 15 teepees in the camp at one point, but that number was down to 10 by Monday morning. At least two of the teepees came down after the court order, while others were taken down for the annual Treaty 4 Gathering taking place in Fort Qu’Appelle, Sask., this week.Regina police spokeswoman Elizabeth Popowich said in an email earlier Monday that the department had been in talks with the province and protesters, and Chief Evan Bray “expects a resolution in the near future.”No deadline was specified in Justice Ysanne Wilkinson’s order to take the camp down.Protester Richelle Dubois said Monday it was “disheartening” to see the number of teepees shrink.“It shows the province’s true colours and how they feel about First Nation children and communities,” she said.Robyn Pitawanakwat, a spokeswoman for the camp, said earlier in the day that protesters were still undecided about where to go from here, and they held several meetings over the weekend to discuss their options.“We’re hopeful — hopeful that there’s still a future for our cause and there’s still a future for our children,” Dubois said.Lawyer Dan LeBlanc, who represents the protesters, wasn’t immediately available for comment. A spokesperson for the provincial government declined to comment further on the future of the camp.Pitawanakwat said spirits have been good at the camp and people have been united since the court order. She said the focus should be on the issues they’ve brought forward, rather than bylaws and permissions.— Follow @RyanBMcKenna on Twitterlast_img read more