DD Motoring: A journey from Glenswilly to Galway

first_imgIn the middle of the flit from one dwelling to another, Mollie climbed into the back of the van with thoughts of also joining the migration south for the winter.The eight-year-old collie has watched this annual packing on a Sunday afternoon all her short life.All onboard. Mollie trying to slip on board for the trip to Galway for in the incoming college term. Photo Brian McDaid.By now she can sense when a new college term is about to begin as students start rummaging around the shed looking for bicycle pumps or combination locks or even a complete bike for the loan of for the winter! Advertisement My old Raleigh bike is still going wellIt’s now four years older than the latest person to take alone of it for their college term in Galway.At the weekend it needed nothing other than its chain oiled and some air in the tyres and treated to two mudguards from Letterkenny bikes and it was on its way to Galway as a third-year students mode of transport for the incoming term.Purchased in 1996 from a Kerryman the late Tim Foley, who ran his business Church Street cycles from what now is known as Letterkenny Cathedral Quarter. Advertisement Years of gears. The old gears still working well on the 25-year-old bike. Photo Brian McDaid.My first new bike, an aluminium Raleigh mountain bike was going to be the answer to beat the hills in Letterkenny and also in the process try and get me a bit fitter and less fat.And at the start, it was a great achievement for me to cycle out past Conwal against the wind and get as far as Glenswilly.SantaAt Christmas, a few ‘go-faster’ accessories from Santa in America, and the bike was back on the road and the new year resolution was back on track.A proud crest from a different era on the Raleigh bike which made the trip to Galway this week. Photo Brian McDaid.Altered with new American road tyres from “Santa”, which replaced the rough mountain tyres that came with the bike, it was a lot easier on the road, but it wasn’t long until the old excuses for not going out were creeping back in and the bike soon spent more time high on the garage wall than on the high roads out the Glen. International connectionsOver the years the bike was used more by the many generations of swallows that flew all the way up from Africa to start a family in our shed in Glencar, and them newly hatched chicks spent more time on the crossbar of that Raleigh bike than the owner as they used it as a launchpad to learn to fly for the first time.Park between the cooker and the washing machine the new home for an old bike in Galway. Photo Brian McDaid.And it was the same for the human fledgelings who started on the stabilisers in and out the ramp at the shed door and progressed to “cool”, status, one of them even getting their bike resprayed in Subaru Blue in an era when they were big fans of Colin McCrea.Colour is not that important anymore as longs it goes. The old Raleigh is on its second tour of duty something that most second-hand bikes don’t survive, between crashing up onto kerbs to lying out in a Galweg in winter of wet wet wet. TakeawayIts old combination lock even bears the teeth marks of a pair of bolt cutters that were making their way through the plastic covering and the steel inside before the bicycle snatcher’s progress was disturbed.Back in the dayI was chatting to my uncle Hughie this week and bikes came up in the conversation.I was telling him about the deal I got on the mudguards for €15 each, he smiled and paused, he told me that his first new bike cost him £15 and ten shillings which he bought from Phil Doherty at his garage in Pluck.He then bought a three-speed hub and had it built into the rear wheel, which was a hard job to do and still end up with a true wheel.Hugh McDaid on the right of this photo who purchased his first bike for all of £15 and Ten shillings back in the day pictured with his brother, my father Fred and their best friend Hughie McGuigan.£15 was big money back then my uncle reminded me, It was three or four weeks wages.So this week our bike, has replaced the destination Glenswilly to that of Galway.Tyres from Thailand on our Raleigh Bike in Galway.And even though it hasn’t turned a wheel much for the owner it has more travelling history than Sir Walter Raleigh.It will make is home outside the digs along the Spanish arches in Galway, complete with Boston bonus accessories, swallow scrapes from Africa, tyres from Thailand, and a small history of one Donegal family.Happy motoring FolksDD Motoring: A journey from Glenswilly to Galway was last modified: September 12th, 2019 by Brian McDaidShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Kids swap suburbs for township

first_imgBoys taking part in the exchange programme get a chance to attend a school that is very different to their own.“I went from a 10-roomed house in Rondebosch to a three-roomed house in Khayelitsha,” said Jem Wilson, one of a group of children from an elite Cape Town primary school who took part in a unique life-skills initiative.The Luleka Exchange Programme, set up over eight years ago, gives boys from Rondebosch Preparatory School in the upmarket Cape Town suburb of Rondebosch and boys from the no-fees state-run Luleka Primary School in Khayelitsha township a chance to spend a day in each others shoes.“Going to Luleka has really opened my eyes to seeing how differently people live,” Jem said.Rondebosch and Khayelitsha are very different places. The former is a residential suburb in the south of Cape Town city centre, nestling below Devil’s Peak and near the main campus of the University of Cape Town. Khayelitsha, on the other hand, is a sprawling semi-informal settlement on the wide plains of the Cape Flats, far from the affluence of the city.In past years the programme only saw boys from Luleka going to spend a day and night in Rondebosch. This year there was a proper exchange, with boys from Khayelitsha going to Rondebosch and Rondebosch boys going to Khayelitsha.The exchange, held in mid-September, kicked off with children and teachers from both schools having an evening get-together at Rondebosch Prep to break the ice. That night each of the Rondebosch kids hosted one of the Khayelitsha boys at their home. The next day the boys from Luleka Primary spent the day at Rondebosch Prep, after which they all left for Khayelitsha.The process was then repeated, with each Khayelitsha boy hosting one Rondebosch boy at their home for the night. The following day the Rondebosch pupils attended Luleka Primary School.Jordan Corfe from Rondebosch Prep was anxious about spending the night in Khayelitsha.“We hear all these horror stories about Khayelitsha, but when I started talking and walking around I soon got the feel of the place,” he said.His schoolmates also quickly learned that the township was not as bad as they had believed. “I didn’t expect that my perception of Khayelitsha was so wrong,” said Daniel Jollivet de Oliviera. “I thought that the crime would be worse than where I live, but our hosts have never been robbed before and they keep their doors open with confidence.“I was surprised at how [many] people my host knew. It seemed as if the whole family lived there, including aunties, cousins and grandparents. It is very community-based.“The Luleka exchange was an awesome experience.”Chris Verster, a teacher at Rondebosch Prep, said the programme is an extension of existing exchange initiatives at the school. “Our aim was for our boys to experience and understand a little bit of another culture,” he said. “We do a lot of interaction with other ‘of our own’ schools as well as two exchanges abroad, in England and Wales.“We hope for our boys to realise that there are other diverse cultures on our doorstep, that contribute to all of us being South African.”Thandi Matrose, a Luleka Primary School teacher, agrees that the programme helps expose children to other cultures.“We are not that different, even though we eat different food and do different things,” she said.She hopes the exchange will help break what she calls, “the cycle of inferiority, and the race barrier”. She believes that despite 15 years of democracy many black people, especially children in townships, still live with the misconception that white people are better and smarter. The exchange showed that that the children from Khayelitsha never expected to have so much in common with kids from a privileged neighborhood.“It was good to see that he showed respect to my parents,” said Luleka pupil Pabotse Lefatsa of his guest from Rondebosch. “You don’t always expect that from a white person.”Although the boys from both schools discovered they had much more in common than they expected, their experience of education was something else.“The boys from Khayelitsha were amazed by the technology at the school, especially the overhead projectors, and also by the sizes of the classrooms,” said Rondebosch pupil Michael Palframan.Describing Luleka Primary, Jett Rogerson from Rondebosch Prep said: “Their school was very different to ours. The teachers did not seem to care what the pupils did. We could walk around outside, you could throw things, and nothing happened. There was little discipline.”Andile Mamfengu from Khayelitsha said of Rondebosch Prep said: “The school was great, they have good discipline and the classes are also smaller. We have 40 kids in a class, they have only 20.”Verster said the two schools cannot really be compared. “We depend nearly entirely on parents’ school fees. Luleka is a no-fees school. The education department supply schools for basic education; we strive to maintain a school of excellence.”Nonetheless, both groups of boys agreed that the experience had taught them that their differences were mainly on the surface. Behind the privilege and the poverty they are much the same – for the most part, overcoming language and cultural barriers was as easy as grabbing a football.More than that, it broadened their view of human experience. As Rondebosch Prep pupil Michael Palframan said, “I thought this was Cape Town, but it is not. There is a whole other world out there.”last_img read more

International Yoga Day: Rajasthan creates Guinness record

first_imgRajasthan created a world record on Thursday by bringing more than a lakh people together at a yoga session.Two representatives from Guinness World Records watched as yoga guru Baba Ramdev put the gathering, which included Rajasthan Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje, through a series of asanas. The international private organisation then handed over a certificate to Ms. Raje and Baba Ramdev, saying it had been the largest gathering worldwide of people performing yoga. Enthusiasts perform yoga during an event to set the Guinness World Record for the largest yoga lesson during the International Day of Yoga at Kota in Rajasthan on June 21, 2018.  | Photo Credit: PTIlast_img

Sports Wrap: Yuvraj eyes Test return, Kohli-Dhoni in IPL faceoff and more

first_imgYuvraj Singh wants to play Tests againYuvraj Singh is not ready to give up. Despite a period of poor form and fitness concerns, Yuvraj Singh has not given up hopes of a Test comeback. The gutsy cricketer has been through a lot over the last half-a-decade and he is now prepared to grind it through further.BCCI forgives West Indies for abandoning 2014 tourBoard of Control for Cricket in India president Shashank Manohar has decided to waive off the USD 41.97 million claim for damages imposed on the West Indies Cricket Board for abandoning their tour of India midway in 2014. West Indies will visit in India to complete the unfinished matches next year.Pune, RCB eye return to winning waysRising Pune Supergiants and Royal Challengers Bangalore will aim to return to winning ways when they meet in an Indian Premier League clash at the Maharashtra Cricket Association Stadium here on Friday. Both teams started off in promising fashion by winning their respective opening matches, but lost their way thereafter with back to back defeats. A win on Friday will be crucial in getting their campaign back on track.Pandya brothers draw inspiration from Pathan brothersThe brothers from Baroda, Hardik and Krunal Pandya, who are stealing the show with some strong performances in the Indian Premier League 2016, said the Pathan brothers — Yusuf and Irfan — who had also played for the city in Gujarat, were their inspiration.Alexis Sanchez double lifts Arsenal into third placeArsenal’s resurgent Alexis Sanchez scored twice to help ease their top-four jitters in a 2-0 victory over West Bromwich Albion in the Premier League at a less than full Emirates Stadium on Thursday. They moved above Manchester City into third place with 63 points.advertisementlast_img read more

10 months agoWest Ham to offer Carroll to Newcastle for Shelvey

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say West Ham to offer Carroll to Newcastle for Shelveyby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWest Ham striker Andy Carroll is being linked with a return to Newcastle United.The Daily Express says Carroll’s agent is in talks over a return to Newcastle.The move would see Jonjo Shelvey transfer to West Ham in a swap.The Hammers are reportedly trying to offload the striker before his contract expires in the summer while Shelvey has fallen down the pecking order under Rafa Benitez. last_img

Metis Nation can go it alone MNC president vows to push government

first_imgAshley BrandsonAPTN NewsThe Metis National Council (MNC) is encouraging the federal government to continue its work on the Indigenous rights framework agreement that was announced by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Valentine’s Day.“The simple answer is yes, the Metis Nation can go it alone,” President Clement Chartier told those gathered in Winnipeg. “There’s no reason why Canada cannot pass the same legislation and make it Metis nation specific.”According to the government, the framework will “provide clarity and certainty on Canada’s responsibilities toward engaging with Indigenous Peoples.”But while Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett has been travelling the country meeting with Indigenous leaders, many First Nation chiefs and grassroots people want the government to put the framework legislation on hold.A B.C. chief told APTN News that Canada may have already decided to delay tabling legislation before the end of year.“I haven’t been told that it’s not going to proceed to try to meet the deadline for passage before the next election,” Chartier said.Tom Isaac, who was federally appointed by Bennett as the minister’s special representative on reconciliation with Metis said the framework is a unique opportunity for the Metis Nation to have their rights acknowledged by the federal government.“What’s important is, is that the framework that’s being proposed is there’s nothing that hurts, negatively impacts or limits the rights,” said Isaac. “It’s all about acknowledgement and moving forward and that’s what’s critical.”Chartier said he remains optimistic that the framework will proceed for the Metis – but is worried about the timeframe.“If it’s not tabled relatively soon it’s not going to meet the deadline prior to the next election,” he said. “At that time it becomes kind of irrelevant, if it’s going to be dealt with after the election because we would need to wait until the outcome of that election and so gets into power.“If liberals get re-elected the we would continue to press them to move forward on that legislation, if the conservatives form government, I don’t think we’d have much of an opportunity to even have that dialogue.”abrandson@aptn.ca@ashleybrandsonlast_img read more

EPA chemical safety nominee drops out amid strong opposition

first_imgWASHINGTON – President Donald Trump’s pick to oversee chemical safety at the Environmental Protection Agency withdrew his nomination Wednesday after bipartisan opposition made his Senate confirmation unlikely.Officials at the White House and the Senate told The Associated Press that Michael Dourson had sent a letter asking his name to be removed from consideration to serve as head of the EPA’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. The two officials were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.North Carolina’s two Republican senators, Richard Burr and Thom Tillis, said last month they would vote against Dourson’s nomination after The Associated Press and other media outlets detailed his past work as a toxicologist hired to defend major chemical companies.The Senate’s 48 Democrats were united in opposition, meaning only one more GOP defection would be needed to defeat Dourson’s nomination.In his letter asking the president to withdraw his name from consideration, which was obtained by the AP, Dourson said his stepping aside “avoids unnecessarily politicizing the important environmental protection goals of Administrator Pruitt.”“I sincerely and deeply appreciate all the love and support by my family, friends and colleagues during this ‘surprising’ confirmation process,” he went on to say.Sen. Tom Carper of Delaware, the top Democrat on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, said his staunch objections to Dourson’s nomination were never a matter of partisanship.“I sincerely believe he is the wrong person to hold this important position, and it’s become clear that, even with a Republican majority in the Senate, he could not be confirmed,” Carper said. “Dourson, an individual who has spent most of his career promoting less protective chemical safety standards, had no business overseeing our nation’s chemical safety laws.”The EPA’s press office did not respond to requests for comment Wednesday evening. Dourson has already been serving at the agency as a senior adviser to EPA administrator Scott Pruitt. It was not immediately clear whether he will continue in that role, which does not require Senate confirmation.The AP reported in September that Dourson has for years accepted payments for criticizing studies that raised concerns about the safety of his clients’ products, according to a review of financial records and his published work.Past corporate clients of Dourson and of a research group he ran include Dow Chemical Co., Koch Industries Inc. and Chevron Corp. His research has also been underwritten by industry trade and lobbying groups representing the makers of plastics, pesticides, processed foods and cigarettes.Burr and Tillis, both of whom are considered reliably pro-business conservatives, cited Dourson’s past work and worries among their home-state constituents about tainted drinking water in opposing his nomination.Marine veterans and their families have blamed decades-old contamination of wells at a North Carolina base with solvents and dry-cleaning chemicals for infant deaths and serious health problems, including cancer.More recently, concerns have been raised about undisclosed discharges of chemicals used to manufacture Teflon and GoreTex into the Cape Fear River, a source of municipal drinking water for Wilmington and other southeastern North Carolina communities.Dourson worked at the EPA for more than a decade, leaving in 1994 as the manager at a lab that assessed the health risks of exposure to chemicals. The following year, he founded Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment, a private, non-profit organization that tests chemicals and produces reports on which chemicals are hazardous in what quantities.Dourson’s views toward industry are consistent with others Trump has selected as top federal regulators. Among them is Pruitt, who in March overruled the findings of his agency’s own scientists to reverse an effort to ban chlorpyrifos, one of the nation’s most widely used pesticides.Court records show Dourson and his work have also often been called on when his corporate clients are seeking to fend off lawsuits.Dourson’s withdrawal was first reported Wednesday by Bloomberg News.___Follow Associated Press environmental reporter Michael Biesecker at http://twitter.com/mbiesecklast_img read more

Alberta premier ready to talk but wants action at Trans Mountain meeting

first_imgEDMONTON – Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says she will attend a meeting about the Trans Mountain pipeline in good faith and with an open mind, but the bottom line is the expansion project must get built without delay.Notley also says she will bring in legislation next week that would allow her to curtail oil shipments to British Columbia — regardless of the outcome of her Sunday meeting with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and B.C. Premier John Horgan.Such action is expected to cause gas prices and other costs to spike in B.C.Trudeau has called the meeting for Ottawa amid increasing public pressure to resolve the impasse over Kinder Morgan’s pipeline from Edmonton to the port at Burnaby, B.C.The $7.4-billion expansion would triple the amount of oil headed to the coast, which Notley says is critical to ease transportation bottlenecks that are causing Canadian heavy oil to sell at a deep discount.The project already has federal approval, but Kinder Morgan says delay tactics and court challenges by B.C. have put the financial viability of it in jeopardy.(Companies in this story: TSX:KML)last_img read more

To grab property woman and lover bump off her parents

first_imgNew Delhi: To grab the parental property, a woman with her paramour hatched the dramatic plot to kill her parents by smothering them to death in Outer Delhi’s Paschim Vihar area. Police have found that the daughter was the main conspirator who mixed sleeping pills in their parent’s tea and later killed them with her lover.An investigator told this newspaper that the daughter during interrogation showed no remorse for killing her parents. “The duo hatched the plan to grab a property owned by the elderly couple at Deepak Vihar’s Nilothi extension. Roughly the cost of property estimated at Rs 50 lakh,” police said. Police identified the accused as Davinder Kaur alias Sonia (mastermind) and Prince Dixit alias Vikram. The investigation agency said that the accused wanted to sell the property so they have contacted few property dealers. “They wanted to flee Delhi at the earliest,” police said. The case came to the limelight on March 8 around 4.30 pm after information was received to police that a female body was found in the drain near village Sayed in Nangloi. “Apparently, it seemed that the deceased was murdered by someone and the dead body was thrown into the drain,” said Deputy Commissioner of Police (Outer) Seju P Kuruvilla. During the investigation, the body was identified as that of Jageer Kaur (47). On further enquiry, it was found that her husband Gurmeet Singh was also missing. During the search on March 9, a male body was found by the police team which was later identified as Gurmeet Singh. “During questioning, the statements of Davinder Kaur were found to be suspicious and contradictory with the facts and circumstances. After sustained interrogation, she finally revealed that she herself was involved in the murder of her parents,” said the DCP. Davinder told police that she had left her husband and was in the relationship with Prince Dixit for the last one year. “Davinder and Dixit wanted to grab the property at Deepak Vihar in Nilothi extension so the duo hatched a conspiracy to kill her parents and grab the property,” the officer said. Jageer Kaur left for Jalandhar on February 10. “On February 21, the accused intoxicated her father by mixing sleeping pills in his tea. At night, Dixit came to the house with two more people and smothered Gurmeet Singh to death. “They then packed the body in a suitcase and threw it in a drain near Sayed Nangloi village,” he added. Dixit fled to Lucknow the next morning along with the two other accused, the officer said. Dixit was informed a day before that Jageer Kaur would return Delhi from Punjab on March 2. “He came back to Delhi with one of his friends. The same day, her daughter gave sleeping pills to her mother and once she fell asleep, Kaur was smothered to death by the accused duo who then disposed of the body in the same drain after stuffing it inside a suitcase,” Kuruvilla said adding that Gurmeet was a carpenter by profession.last_img read more

Sweatproof your makeup this season

first_imgSummer is full of wonderful things – but melting makeup, smeared eyeliner, and super-sticky lipstick are not among them. Here one need to adopt best tips for keeping makeup looking fresh and pretty, even when the weather is working against you. So here is the checklist of skin care habit to adopt in this summer to prevent melting makeup. Slather the sunscreen Skipping the sunscreen is a cardinal sin on any given day. But the effects of it are even harsher on days when the sun is at its brightest. Look for sunscreen with SPF 30 at least and make it a part of your daily skincare routine before you step out of the house. Also Read – An income drop can harm brainHack to ensure you apply sunscreen everyday is to find a moisturiser that has a generous amount of SPF in it. Apply It generously not just on the face but also neck, arms, and chest or any part of the body that may be exposed to the sun. Scrub with care It’s during warmer months that your skin need exfoliation the most. Gentle exfoliation during the warmer months saves you from clogged pores and removes blackheads and whiteheads, which in turn gives your skin a chance to breathe. As with any skincare product, it’s best to scan the label beforehand for red flags such as fragrances and alcohol. For sensitive skin, explicators with micro-beads work best. Also Read – Shallu Jindal honoured with Mahatma Award Lighten the lotion Moisturisers don’t have to be banished to the back ends of your beauty drawer with the dawn of spring. In fact, using light, water-based moisturisers will keep your skin soft and nourished during these months. This holds especially true for these with sensitive skin as water-based moisturisers get absorbed easily and don’t leave a tacky layer behind the same theory applies to body lotions. Using oil- or glycerin-based body lotions can cause acne on your back and upper arms bringing your noodle strap top dreams to a resounding halt. Chuck out your old make-up We all have a soft corner for that limited edition blush or that perfect shade of lipstick we bought a few years ago even though our minds tell us to bin it. But you need to start listening to your logic and follow the expiry dates.This includes filtering the stash and getting rid of lipsticks that smell wired, foundations that have separated and blushes that have damaged bristles. (inputs by Yashu Jain, MD, Mattlook cosmetics)last_img read more