“Little League for esports” hopes to organize youth gaming

first_imgIn this Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018, image provided by Super League Gaming, New York Fury team competitors react during a Super League Gaming competition against a team from Boston at City Center 15 Cinema de Lux in White Plains, N.Y. Super League is trying to bring structure to an industry devoid of it at the youth level. The league was founded in 2015 and has teams in 16 cities for its three gaming titles: “Minecraft” for younger players, and “League of Legends” and “Clash Royale” for players as old as their mid-30s. (Maria Gambale/Super League Gaming via AP)WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Christian Pineda plays a lot of video games, but he’s best at “Minecraft.” Hunched over a laptop in the front row of a half-full movie theater last month, the 13-year-old eagerly showed off why.“I basically know the controls like the back of my hand,” he said before turning his focus back to a tight match against a rival team from Boston. Christian claims to be shy at school, but here, he’s a vocal leader on a New York team of nearly 20 esports competitors, some as young as 6 years old. With a spot in the league finals on the line, Christian tapped away at his keyboard and excitedly discussed tactics with teammates.ADVERTISEMENT The group was strategizing over pickaxes and archers, not pitchers and catchers, but the focus on teamwork and communication could have come straight from the bench at a youth baseball game.At Super League Gaming events like this, that’s the goal.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back Chriss“Like Little League for esports,” says Super League CEO Ann Hand.Super League is trying to bring structure to an industry devoid of it at the youth level. The organization was founded in 2015 and runs national leagues for three esports games: “Minecraft” for players in elementary and middle school, and “League of Legends” and “Clash Royale” for older players. Kids are often introduced to competitive video games via “Minecraft” before graduating to “League of Legends,” giving them a place to train and play throughout their teenage years and beyond — the “League of Legends” competitions don’t have an age limit. Super League Gaming has tens of thousands of players, although not all attend every live event, and its “Minecraft” championship has been turned into a reality TV show on Nickelodeon. Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next The hope is that Super League can close a major gap in the esports ecosystem for young gamers, particularly in the U.S. The industry is set to eclipse $1 billion soon, and there are more professional opportunities than ever. Pros in the NA LCS — the top North American “League of Legends” circuit — averaged over $300,000 in salary this season, and many colleges now provide esports scholarships. Careers in esports coaching or game design are increasingly in demand, too.But to pursue those jobs, players need to start early. Esports pros often peak in their early 20s, and elite talents in countries like South Korea are being identified before reaching middle school.The relatively weak U.S. gamer pool is holding back North American franchises from competing on an international stage. Esports powerhouse Cloud9 became the first NA LCS club to even make the semifinals at the League of Legends World Championship this year, and it only had one U.S. player in its starting lineup. The lackluster American feeder system was a talking point when NA LCS franchise owners met this summer.“A lot of our amateur system has fallen away,” said NA LCS Commissioner Chris Greeley. “I think we all agree that it is shallower right now than it could be and should be.”Riot Games, which publishes “League of Legends” and manages its professional circuits, is partnered with Super League and hopes the organization can boost the reputation of American gaming. Super League uses proprietary software to pair players with competition at the appropriate skill level, and its weekly in-person events allow for stronger development than if players were left to practice alone. Super League also makes it easier for pro franchises to scout players and evaluate their talent and makeup.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? NBA-best Raptors hand Clippers worst loss of season Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. After winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkcenter_img ‘Mia’: Rom-com with a cause a career-boosting showcase for Coleen Garcia Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college No.13 lucky for Orlando Bloom Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew MOST READ “You can’t really just look at the best players online and use that as your primary way to find the next great pro because the problem is that you don’t know a lot about their behaviors,” Hand said. “Will they be able to handle the pressure of being at the Staples Center or Madison Square Garden?”Just like Little League, it’s not strictly about churning out elite talent. Super League also creates an in-person sense of community around gaming, one that allows parents to watch and even coach. Some have concerns about their kids spending too much time on screens, but at least with Super League, gaming happens in a social, supervised space — better than playing solo in a basement or bedroom.“It’s one of the best decisions we’ve made,” said Alon Rothschild, who drives his 11-year-old son, Frankie Capello, over an hour from Staten Island to compete with New York’s “Minecraft” team.The co-ed organization provides players with uniforms, tech support and access to its digital platform, which allows players to log into Super League competitions from anywhere. But it’s the in-person events that pull kids in.“You’re actually sitting next to each other and you’re talking,” Frankie said. “When you’re talking, you basically are getting the better experience with your friends. I love talking with my friends and doing this.”The league hasn’t turned out any professional players, though it’s taking steps to ramp up its gamer development. It has created a training program within its software for at-home use and is offering boot camps focused on helping players improve. Hand wants to begin hiring former professional gamers to coach at Super League events, too.Super League is also eyeing expansion into games like “Fortnite.” Although Super League’s player base is believed to be the largest of its kind in the U.S., it still represents a sliver of the gaming world, leaving a lot of room for growth before Super League is as synonymous with esports as Little League is with baseball.Getting there could be a boon in an already booming industry.“A kid who does play Little League is an MLB fan for life,” Hand said. “Cultivating that future fan through our youth leagues is really essential.” View commentslast_img read more

PPP Commissioners slam lack of transparency

first_imgGECOM system– insist publication of nominator lists a statutory obligationThe People’s Progressive Party (PPP) commissioners at the Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) are unhappy with the lack of accountability at that entity; and this is especially since there are just 43 days to go before Local Government Elections are held.Those commissioners, in an interview with this publication, made it clear that there are times when requests for information get them nowhere. One problem identified by Commissioner Sase Gunraj is the manner in which meetings are held.“You’ve heard in the media us complaining and saying things recently about the quality of the meetings, the discussions, the timing of the meetings; and thoseThe publication of the nominator lists, according to the commissioners, is a necessitystatements are not very complimentary of GECOM,” he said.“Because the meetings are truncated in terms of time, the discussions, sometimes even though they may be long-winded, do not end in implementable decisions,” Gunraj said. “And generally, at the commission level, it’s as though you have to squeeze blood out of stone to get what is happening.”According to Gunraj, those commissioners perceive the operations at the commission level are running on a need-to-know basis.Elaborating on the way meetings are held, PPP Commissioner Bibi Shadick compared what obtains now to the days of former Chairman Steve Surujbally, who demitted office in 2017.“Statutory meetings are held on Tuesdays and are supposed to start at one o’clock. From the first day, the Chairman announces that he’s not going beyond certain hours. First it was five o’clock. Then it came up to four o’clock. Then, if something is being discussed and the Chairman doesn’t (want to stay), he gets up,” she explained.“This has happened on more than one occasion. The thing about it is the commission under Surujbally was long hours, but at least we didn’t have a chairman that used to get up and walk out. This now is happening,” she declared.Retired Justice James Patterson was appointed GECOM Chairman late last year. The commission would be holding Local Government elections on November 12. Already, much controversy has surrounded the elections, including political parties accusing each other of submitting fraudulent lists on Nomination Day.ListsMeanwhile, Gunraj also addressed concerns about the publication of the candidates and backers’ lists. While Government officials have suggested that this should not have been done at all, Gunraj has insisted that the law makes it necessary.“All that is done for elections are a statutory process. Included in that process is that, upon receipt of the lists by the Returning Officer on Nomination Day within the specified period, they are required by law to post that list in a conspicuous place outside the RO office. That was done,” he said.“In fact, myself and other commissioners looked at this exercise at various RO offices throughout the Coast. I was on the East Coast; I know Commissioner Shadick was on the East Bank. I was also at Critchlow Labour College, where it was attended by a large media contingent (and) in person by the Minister of Communities and the Chairman of GECOM.”Gunraj noted that all those officials had observed the process, and he denied claims that the lists were published because of the PPP Commissioners.At a recent Alliance for Change (AFC) press conference, it was reported that that party’s Campaign Manager, David Patterson, had compared publicising of the lists to opening a can of worms. But according to Gunraj, the transparency it afforded highlighted electoral fraud.“It is an outcome of the viewing of these lists that all these issues have now arisen. People started to complain that they never signed lists. People started to complain that they did sign lists, but were duped into so doing,” he said.“They were told they were signing for better roads or old age pension. Another one I heard was they was listing persons to join a Community Policing Group. All of those are instances of fraud,” Gunraj said, adding that no right thinking person should countenance such things.last_img read more

Harambee Stars’ Omar sacked by Bulgarian club

first_img0Shares0000ABUD OMARNAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 19 – Bulgarian club Slavia Sofia have sacked Harambee Stars left-back Aboud Omar, accusing the defender of insulting his team-mates and coaches.In a statement the club said the problems had been going on for several months and that he had also shown disrespect to Bulgaria. “I decided to remove Aboud Omar from the team and his contractual relations with the club will be suspended under the existing legal order,” Slavia president Ventseslav Stefanov said in a statement.The 25-year-old left back, who is yet to comment on the club’s decision, became the first Kenyan player in the Bulgarian league when he joined them in 2016.He was instrumental in helping the seven-times Bulgarian champions qualify for the Europa League a few months later.“For no apparent reason, the player became cruel and arrogant,” Stefanov said.“He learned the most vulgar phrases in Bulgarian and began to address them to his team mates without exception.“The impudent Kenyan began to curse everything, related to life in our country and did not try to conceal his dislike for the Bulgarian state at all…”Stefanov said that all Slavia players unanimously supported his decision to dismiss Omar, capped more than 30 times by Kenya.-By BBC Sport-0Shares0000(Visited 3 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Emma was born at 536 am As Emma was the first to

first_imgEmma was born at 5.36 am.As Emma was the first to be born on Christmas Day in the hospital she received a blanket kindly knitted by Sharon Lack, Domestic Assistant based at Postnatal Ward.The Labour Ward, Midwifery Led Unit and Postnatal Ward staff at Altnagevlin Hospital are always on hand for new arrivals, especially at Christmas time. The Western Trust say the staff “simply love to welcome babies into the world over the festive period”. Emma Harley MullanPicture Special: Little bundles of joy born on Christmas Day in Altnagelvin HospitalWESTERN TRUST ShareTweet Fionn Harley Mullan; Jack Mullan; Rebecca Harley and baby Emma Harley MullanGORGEOUS EMMA Harley Mullan was the first baby born on Christmas Day in Altnagelvin Hospital. The little bundle of joy is pictured here with brother Fionn Harley Mullan and proud parents Jack Mullan Rebecca Harley. Congratulations to all the proud mums and dads and a big thank you to all the staff who helped deliver the new babies on Christmas Day.Midwife Ann Hart with baby Theo Taylor from Drumahoe and his proud daddy.Midwife Ann Hart with baby Theo Taylor from Drumahoe and his proud daddy.Baby girl, Doherty with her dad, JonathanOur postnatal midwives posing with the first Christmas Baby at Altnagevlin Hospital, baby Emma Harley MullanThe Labour Ward And Midwifery Led Unit Staff on the Christmas Day shiftPicture Special: Little bundles of joy born on Christmas Day in Altnagelvin Hospital was last modified: December 27th, 2018 by John2John2 Tags:last_img read more