Trump sets expectations low for Helsinki summit with Putin

first_imgA man with a Putin mask and a rainbow flag attends a rally against the policy of US president Donald Trump and Russian president Vladimir Putin in central Helsinki, Sunday, 15 July 2018. President Trump and president Putin will meet in Finland`s capital on Monday, 16 July 2018.President Donald Trump is setting expectations low for his high-stakes summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, assuring that “nothing bad … and maybe some good will come out” of Monday’s meeting in Finland. His national security adviser said they aren’t looking for “concrete deliverables.”Trump also tells CBS News in an interview conducted Saturday that he “hadn’t thought” about asking Putin to extradite the dozen Russian military intelligence officers indicted this past week in Washington on charges related to the hacking of Democratic targets in the 2016 US presidential election.But after being given the idea by his interviewer, Trump said “certainly I’ll be asking about it.”He blamed the Democratic National Committee for “allowing themselves to be hacked” by Russians trying to help elect him.The US has no extradition treaty with Moscow and can’t compel Russia to hand over citizens. Russia’s constitution prohibits extraditing its citizens to foreign countries.Asked whether Trump would ask Putin to turn over the 12 military intelligence officials, US national security adviser John Bolton called the idea “pretty silly” and said doing so would put the president in a “weak position.”He said Trump goes into the summit with a stronger hand because of the indictments.”I think the president can put this on the table and say, ‘This is a serious matter that we need to talk about,'” Bolton said. He said asking for the indicted Russians to be turned over would have the opposite effect.”For the president to demand something that isn’t going to happen puts the president in a weak position, and I think the president has made it very clear he intends to approach this discussion from a position of strength.”In the CBS News interview, Trump said he’s entering the Helsinki summit with “low expectations. I’m not going with high expectations.” He declined to discuss his goals, but said such sessions are beneficial. He cited his historic meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in June as a “good thing,” along with meetings he’s had with Chinese president Xi Jinping.”Nothing bad is going to come out of it (Helsinki), and maybe some good will come out,” Trump said.He described the European Union, a bloc of nation’s that includes many of America’s closest allies, as a “foe.””I think the European Union is a foe, what they do to us in trade,” Trump said, adding that “you wouldn’t think of the European Union but they’re a foe.”He said Russia is a foe “in certain respects” and that China is a foe “economically … but that doesn’t mean they are bad. It doesn’t mean anything. It means that they are competitive.” Trump has been reluctant to criticise Putin over the years and has described him as a competitor in recent days.Trump said he respects Europe’s leaders but adds that they’ve taken advantage of the US on trade and defense spending.The president sat for the interview Saturday in Scotland and CBS News released excerpts hours before Trump flew to Helsinki on Sunday.Trump and Putin have held talks twice before. Their first meeting came last July while both participated in an international summit and continued for more than two hours, well over the scheduled 30 minutes. The leaders also met last fall during a separate summit in Vietnam.But Jon Huntsman, the US ambassador to Russia, said Monday’s meeting “is really the first time for both presidents to actually sit across the table and have a conversation and I hope it’s a detailed conversation about where we might be able to find some overlapping and shared interests.”Congressional Democrats and at least one Republican have called on Trump to pull out of Monday’s meeting unless he is willing to make Russian election-meddling the top issue. Huntsman said the summit must go on because Russian engagement is needed to solve some international issues.”The collective blood pressure between the United States and Russia is off-the-charts high so it’s a good thing these presidents are getting together,” he said.Trump has said he will raise the issue of Russian election meddling, along with Syria, Ukraine, nuclear proliferation and other topics. Bolton described the meeting as “unstructured” and said: “We’re not looking for concrete deliverables here.”Sen Chris Murphy, D-Conn., rejected Bolton’s assertion that the indictments put Trump in a stronger position going in to the meeting.”He has already said that he has asked Putin about meddling, Putin told him he didn’t do it, and he believed him,” Murphy said. “And so it just belies common sense that the president of the United States, this president, is going to sit down across from Putin and press him hard on the issue of Russian meddling.”Putin has denied meddling in the election.Sen Rand Paul, R-Ky., said it’s inevitable that Russia will interfere in US elections and that it’s pointless for Trump to confront Putin about it.Paul said both countries spy on each other but adds that Russian interference in the 2016 election isn’t “morally equivalent” to US interference in Russian elections, but “I think in their mind it is.”Huntsman was interviewed on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Paul appeared on CNN’s “State of the Union,” and Bolton and Murphy spoke on ABC’s “This Week.”last_img

Guarding Against Prescription Errors

first_imgGlenn EllisMedication errors are one of the most common medical errors. According to data from the Centers for Disease Control, approximately 1.3 million people are injured annually in the United States following so-called “medication errors.” The only way you can make informed decisions and use medicines safely is to know what information is important to obtain from health professionals, how to incorporate the medicine into your daily lifestyle, how to manage side effects, when to seek medical help and how to keep track of important information for the doctor and pharmacist.  Ask your doctor why you need the medicine being prescribed and how it is going to help you. Discuss any concerns you have about taking the medicine so that you have all the information you need to decide whether you want to take it. If you do not want to take the medicine, discuss this with your doctor so that a treatment more acceptable to you can be prescribed. The average person forgets 50 percent of what the doctor tells them by the time they arrive at the pharmacy. So ask the pharmacist to go over all the instructions again. Be sure you know how to administer the medicine correctly. Some medicines, such as inhalers that treat asthma, require complicated steps. Your doctor and pharmacist can show you the steps to follow when using an inhaler so that the medicine will reach your lungs and not get sprayed on the back of your throat where it will not work. You may want to ask the pharmacist to let you practice using the inhaler in the pharmacy. A prescription label that states “Take 1 tablet 3 times a day” does not give you enough information. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to help you determine the best times to take the medication so you can easily work the dosage schedule into your daily activities, meal times and work. You will find it easier to remember to take your medicine if it fits in with your normal lifestyle.  Try not to adjust your medicine or skip doses without discussing this first with your doctor or pharmacist. Some medicines can cause very serious side effects if they are stopped suddenly. Many prescription medicines can interact with other meds as well as with over-the-counter products and herbal remedies. Your doctor and pharmacist should review all of your medicines at each visit and make sure that you are not taking any prescription medicines that can adversely interact. If you think you are having a side effect and don’t know what to do, call your doctor or pharmacist. You also need to tell them if you have done anything to try to treat it –  such as skipping a dose, stopping the medicine, or taking an over-the-counter or herbal remedy. Some people find it helpful to keep a “medicine diary” they can take with them to their next doctor and pharmacy visit. This diary can help you remember important information to tell your doctor so the doctor can decide if you really had a side effect or if the symptom may have been caused by something else. Your diary can also help remind you of important questions you want to ask.  Some medicines must be stored away from heat, light or moisture in order to keep their strength. Transdermal patches should not be thrown away where children can find them and put them on like Band-Aids. If you are traveling in a car during hot weather, don’t store your medicines in the glove compartment; the heat can destroy the medicine and it may not work. Select your pharmacist with the same care that you select your doctor. Be sure at each pharmacy visit to tell the pharmacist if you have had any problems with any of your medicines. Your pharmacist can often provide helpful advice. You should expect to receive written information from the pharmacy that you can take home. Keep this information in a place where you can find it if you need it. However, the written instructions should never  take the place of personal counseling. You need your questions answered so you can manage your medicines safely. Find out how many days in advance you should order your refills. Ask your pharmacist to develop a program to help remind you to get your refills. If you are having trouble remembering to take your medicine, it is important to let your doctor know. Otherwise, your doctor may think that the medicine is not working and may prescribe another medicine that is less effective or has more side effects. All that really may be needed is a more convenient dosage schedule for you. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Asking questions if you have any suspicions at all is a free and easy way to ensure that you don’t become the victim of a medication error. Remember, I’m not a doctor. I just sound like one. DISCLAIMER: The information included in this column is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan.) Glenn Ellis, is a regular media contributor on Health Equity and Medical Ethics. He is the author of Which Doctor?, and Information is the Best Medicine. Listen to him every Saturday at 9 a.m. (EST) on  www.900amwurd.com, and Sundays at 8:30 a.m. (EST) on www.wdasfm.com. For more good health information, visit: glennellis.comlast_img read more

For the Chinese connect

first_imgShe started liking the poetry of India’s poet laureate Rabindranath Tagore while in school, and now China’s noted dulcimer player Liu Yuening has made the first Chinese transcription of Tagore’s songs with the aim of creating an enduring basis for India-China ties as the two countries embark on summit-level talks after a month of problems this week. ‘Tagore’s poetry is like music, it is melodic, sweet and lovely,’ Liu said in an interview here on her way back from Kolkata where she attended the opening of a China gallery at Rabindra Bharati University in Jorasanko, Tagore’s ancestral estate, earlier this week. The gallery has several photographs of Tagore and his family members’ visit to China. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ At a concert in Kolkata to mark the 150th anniversary Tagore’s birth in 2011, Liu on the dulcimer had presented a combination of Chinese and Indian music accompanied by Indian musicians and instruments like the tabla. Beyond her childhood love for Tagore’s poetry, it is her musical instrument – yangqin or the Chinese-hammered dulcimer – that has made Liu the leading exponent of the India-China music dialogue and a key ambassador of culture. The yangqin is a stringed musical instrument with the strings stretched over a trapezoidal sounding board. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix ‘The first world-wide dialogue between Indian yangqin or santoor and Chinese yangqin was held in Calcutta in 2011 at the concert themed ‘Night of the Orient, When East Meets East’, said Liu, who has studied in India with noted santoor maestro Shiv Kumar Sharma. ‘More than 20 countries around the world have this instrument that originated in the Iran-Iraq region,’ Liu said of the Chinese dulcimer that is quite similar to the santoor.Liu undertook a seven-month research at the University of Delhi on a Ford Foundation fellowship in 2009 to explore the grammar of the two musical instruments of the same family. Liu, who is a professor at China’s Central Conservatory of Music and the youngest professor of yangqin in the country’s history, aims to create an enduring basis of dialogue ‘between our two oriental cultures’.  ‘With my Indian gurus, I am trying to make a new style of India-China music… Chinese melody, put in the Indian raga structure to create a new sentence and style,’ Liu said.Liu directs a yangqin ensemble called Jasmine and plans to bring it to India on a music tour of the Buddhist heritage sites. In May 2009, Liu held a trio concert with an Indian band called the Kedia Brothers in Jharkhand, where the yangqin, the sitar and the sarod were played together. ‘The basic tones in Chinese music are also found in India music,’ said Liu. Chinese Premier arrived in the Capital to have the first summit-level formal talks.last_img read more

French honour for Manish Arora

first_imgThe world of fashion in India saw a new beginning, when a veteran fashion designer was honoured by the French Government for his dedication to the world Fashion.His Excellency, The Ambassador of France, Francois Richier, conferred the Chevalier de la légion d’Honneur on veteran fashion designer Manish Arora, at the Residence of France, in the national Capital on Tuesday. The Ambassador of France bestowed Manish with the medal and the two clinked champagne glasses celebrating the ceremony.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The Legion of Honour, the highest distinction is a French order established by Napoleon Bonaparte on 1802. The award, is bestowed on both citizens of France as well as foreigners. In the past, eminent Indian personalities like Pandit Ravi Shankar, Amitabh Bachchan and JRD Tata have been honored with the prestigious award.  The award is a recognition by France for Manish’s distinguished and critically applauded work and contribution to the world of fashion. Beginning the investiture ceremony, Fashion Features Director of Vogue and a close friend of Manish, Bandana Tewari, read out an entrancing personal note on the veteran fashion designer. The account narrated by Tiwari spoke of Manish’s humble beginning and his journey though the world of fashion, in India and abroad. Following the personal account, the guests were treated with an audio-visual, highlighting some of the successful shows of the designer and the comments and best wishes from eminent personalities on his triumph. Manish thanked everyone present at the event and said, “I’m amazed and honoured by the recognition I have received from the country that I love with all my heart. I hope to keep getting inspired by France, the beauty and elegance of the French.” He also thanked the French government for, “doing this for the first time in the world of fashion, in India. Only the French can do this, they can spot you, pick you up and tell you, ‘you deserve it’”.Ambassador François Richier said, “Manish has a long-standing connection with France, which is like a second home for him. He is a pioneer in bringing the fashion culture of both countries together with his lively imagination. I am delighted to confer this high honour on him.”last_img read more

Recordhigh 65 million passengers flew with WestJet in Q3

first_img Share Tags: WestJet Thursday, October 12, 2017 Posted by CALGARY — WestJet is flying high with the news that it flew 6.5 million guests in the third quarter of 2017, an all-time record high for the airline and a year-over-year increase of 10.7%.September 2017 traffic results also revealed a load factor of 80.4%, an increase of 0.5 percentage points year over year. Revenue passenger miles (RPMs), or traffic, increased 5.9% year over year, and capacity (measured in available seat miles, or ASMs), grew 5.3% over the same period.“We are very pleased with our strong traffic growth, as we reported record load factors each month this quarter, which translated into achieving both our highest ever quarterly load factor of 85.7%, and flying an all-time quarterly record number of guests in our 21-year history,” said WestJet President and CEO Gregg Saretsky. “I want to sincerely thank our over 13,000 WestJetters for continuing to deliver our award-winning brand of friendly caring service as we transition through our shoulder period into the busy winter season.”More news:  Apply now for AQSC’s agent cruise ratesThese record numbers come on the heels of WestJet breaking ground on its new $50 million hangar project at YYC Calgary International Airport in September. The hangar, once complete, will occupy 125,000 square feet, accommodate its new Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner aircraft and stand eight stories tall.Also in September, WestJet announced the name and logo for its ultra-low-cost airline in Canada. Named Swoop, the ULCC will begin selling flights in early 2018.center_img Record-high 6.5 million passengers flew with WestJet in Q3 << Previous PostNext Post >> Travelweek Group last_img read more