Kress named dean of Ohio State CFAES

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio State University has recommended the appointment of Cathann Arceneaux Kress, PhD, as vice president for agricultural administration and dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES). She currently is vice president for extension and outreach and director of cooperative extension at Iowa State University. Subject to approval by Ohio State’s Board of Trustees, Kress will begin her appointment May 1.“It’s an honor to join the incredible community of faculty, staff and volunteers dedicated to all of CFAES’s missions in education, research, outreach and service. I’m excited by the opportunities and multiple ways we can enhance the capacities and impacts of CFAES,” Kress said. “I’d like to thank the members of the search committee for their service, and I look forward to meeting many colleagues, students, alumni and friends in the coming months.”As vice president for agricultural administration and dean of CFAES, Kress will be the chief academic and administrative officer of the college and will be responsible for leading its education, research, service and outreach missions. The dean also leads fundraising efforts and facilitates strategic internal and external relationships of the college.“I look forward to working with Cathann as we move forward with an ambitious agenda for our college and university,” said Bruce A. McPheron, PhD, Ohio State’s executive vice president and provost.In her current role, Kress leads the land-grant mission of teaching, research and service for the public good at Iowa State. This $100 million operation connects the full assets of the university with all of Iowa. Her success in using university-wide outreach programs to enhance education and innovation in Iowa communities has aligned with her key responsibility to advise the president and provost on extension and outreach issues.Kress has taught undergraduate and graduate students at all levels. In addition, her research and applied research efforts have focused on impacts on rural populations. For example, her work has included the impacts of multiple deployments on dependent children of National Guard and Reserve service members; programs to assist disadvantaged children, youth and families; and on achievement gaps that impact rural youth.Prior to her leadership at Iowa State, Kress served as a senior policy analyst of Military Community and Family Policy at the Department of Defense in Washington, D.C. In addition, she has served as director of youth development at the National 4-H Headquarters, U.S. Department of Agriculture, also in Washington, D.C.; and as assistant director, Cornell Cooperative Extension, and state program leader at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.Among her many national leadership roles, she currently serves as a trustee of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation Board in Battle Creek, Michigan; secretary and incoming chair, administrative heads section of the Board on Agriculture Assembly, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities; and as a National 4-H Council trustee.Kress earned a BS in social work at Iowa State and an MA in counselor education/college student development and a PhD in education, both from the University of Iowa.last_img read more

Where is fiber fermented in the pig digestive tract?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Fiber is increasingly being added to pig diets, but digestion of fiber in pigs is inefficient and poorly understood. In a new study from the University of Illinois, scientists pinpoint the locations within the digestive tract where fiber is fermented.“We’re trying to figure out the specifics of fiber fermentation in pigs and what can we potentially do to increase it,” said Hans Stein, professor in the Department of Animal Sciences and the Division of Nutritional Sciences at U of I.Stein’s research group formulated four experimental diets, including a standard corn-soybean meal diet as a control. Different fiber sources replaced 30% of the control diet in the remaining three diets: distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), wheat middlings, and soybean hulls.The researchers placed two cannulas in each of eight barrows, which allowed them to collect digesta from the end of the small intestine and from the colon, just after the cecum. Fecal samples were also collected from each pig. Values were calculated for apparent ileal digestibility (AID), apparent cecal digestibility (ACD), and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD).“This allowed us to quantify disappearance of nutrients and energy through fermentation at every point along the digestive tract. We know there’s fermentation in the cecum, but we didn’t know how much there was. And we also were able to quantify what happens in the colon,” Stein said.The insoluble fiber in wheat middlings was fermented more readily than in soybean hulls or DDGS, suggesting it may be the best fiber source of the three. For the soluble fiber fraction, there were no differences among the diets.The site of fermentation for soluble fiber was either in the small intestine or in the cecum, whereas for insoluble fiber, fermentation occurred in the colon.“This is the first study to determine the different places in the pig digestive tract where fiber is fermented. We will use this information to conduct more research and determine if we can solubilize more fiber and therefore get more energy out of it early in the digestive tract,” Stein said. “We can potentially target enzymes or other additives to help microbes ferment more fiber.”The article, “Disappearance of nutrients and energy in the stomach, and small intestine, cecum, and colon of pigs fed corn-soybean meal diets containing distillers dried grains with solubles, wheat middlings, or soybean hulls,” is published in the Journal of Animal Science. Former Ph.D. student Neil Jaworski and Stein co-authored the article. Financial support was provided by the National Pork Board.last_img read more

Meghalaya mine mishap: No change in water level

first_imgThe multi-agency operations to rescue the miners in Meghalaya failed to make any headway on Thursday, with efforts to pump the water out of the mine not yielding any result. The divers of the Navy and the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) were not able to resume the search operation for the 15 trapped miners as they could not go inside due to the high water level. Asked if the divers would take another chance later in the day, operation spokesperson R Susngi told PTI that they would wait, but there was a remote chance of the water level reducing so soon. The 15 miners remain trapped in the 370-foot-deep illegal rat-hole coal mine in Lumthari village of East Jaintia Hills district since December 13 after water from a nearby river gushed in. The operation to rescue them entered the 22nd day on Thursday. Fire service personnel from Odisha resumed work at 10 am and it was found that the water level has risen again, a day after full-day pumping resulted in it receding by 16 inches, Mr. Susngi said. One more pump will be put to use at the mine on Thursday and another would will be installed at an abandoned mine, about 100 metres away, he said. Meanwhile, the high-powered submersible pump from Coal India is yet to begin work, three days after it arrived at the site. Preparation is still going on to get the pump operational, Mr. Susngi said. The spokesperson had said divers would resume operation once the water level at the main shaft decreases to about 100 feet from its current level of over 160 feet. Authorities said there were at least 90 abandoned mine shafts in the area and they were full of water. Rescuers believe that these nearby mines might be interconnected and draining out water in these mines could help in reducing the water level in the main shaft.last_img read more