Vermont hospitals show low infection rate in national report

first_imgThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) has released its “First State-Specific Healthcare-Associated Infections Summary Data Report”, which gives an overview of where the country stands in efforts to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). The report is based on both national and state-specific CLABSI data collected by NHSN.The NHSN report looked at CLABSI data from January – June 2009. During that time, Vermont hospitals reported CLABSI rates that were among the lowest of the seventeen states that were included in the report, and that were significantly lower than the report’s standardized infection ratio baseline of 1.0. Vermont’s ratio for the period reported was 0.27.“This report is good news for Vermonters who depend on Vermont hospitals to provide quality health care services and treatment,” said Paulette J. Thabault, Commissioner of Banking, Insurance, Securities & Health Care Administration. “Vermont’s leadership in this area has been the result of extraordinary collaboration between consumer advocates, the Legislature, hospital infection preventionists, the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, the Vermont Program for Quality in Health Care, and state agencies.”Jill Olson, Vice President of Policy and Operations at the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, echoed Thabault’s sentiment about the dedication and effort responsible for the positive results reported by NHSN. “Vermont’s results are a credit to the physicians and nurses who take care of Vermonters every day, and to the dedicated hospital infection preventionists who help bring medical evidence into practice at the bedside.” “This is real health care reform: quality and safety improvements for patients. Vermont’s excellent performance demonstrates the importance of transparency and public reporting in spurring quality improvement. It’s a proud day for consumer advocates, hospitals and BISHCA here in Vermont,” said Jeanne Keller, who represents a small business association, Business Resource Services, on the Hospital Report Card Advisory Panel.Vermont was the third state in the country to publicly report hospital-specific CLABSI rates, beginning in 2007, as part of health care quality improvement efforts overseen by BISHCA. Vermont hospitals have participated in the NHSN system since 2006, and Vermont was the first state to utilize the system for public reporting. The CLABSI report is part of BISHCA’s annual Hospital Report Card, which can be found on the BISHCA website. A copy of the NHSN report is also available on BISHCA’s site.According to the CDC, an estimated 248,000 bloodstream infections occur in U.S. hospitals each year. It is believed that a large proportion of these are associated with the presence of a central line – a flexible tube inserted near the heart or into one of the large veins or arteries, and used to administer medication or fluids, obtain blood tests, and directly obtain cardiovascular measurements. Because of where central lines are located, they can cause potentially dangerous bloodstream infections. Bloodstream infections can cause longer hospital stays, increased costs and increased risk of mortality. CLABSI can be prevented through proper management of central lines.About BISHCAThe Vermont Department of Banking, Insurance, Securities & Health Care Administration touches most Vermonters in some fashion, through its regulation and monitoring of a broad spectrum of financial and health industry activities. Regulated entities/areas include, for example: banks, licensed lenders, credit unions, insurance companies and their products, agents, securities firms, broker/dealers and investment advisors, HMO’s and hospital finances.Source: BISHCA. 5.27.2010last_img read more

NCUA issues proposal to allow capitalization of interest

first_img The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) Board recently issued a proposed rule that would remove the prohibition on capitalization of interest in connection with loan workouts and modifications. NAFCU’s Regulatory Alerton the proposed rule provides all the details you need to better understand the rule and help us provide useful feedback to NCUA as to whether this rule strikes the correct balance of helpful but not too burdensome. The capitalization of interest is the addition of unpaid interest to the principal balance of a loan. This practice is particularly useful in managing loans in deferment or forbearance, which has been regularly offered during the COVID-19 pandemic. Borrowers are still facing financial hardships as a result of the pandemic that has stretched almost ten months in the United States. Access to viable solutions to address deferred interest will help borrowers and credit unions navigate the uncertain new year ahead.NAFCU has advocated for a capitalization of interest allowance several times this year, including two letters written to NCUA in March and September. The letters, as well as NCUA’s rule release, mention operational concerns and the overly burdensome nature of the restriction. This relief will help credit unions and their members to meet loan obligations during the pandemic and beyond.Current StructureUnder the current loan modification structure, the options for borrowers are limited. Many borrowers may have already been delinquent when their deferment period began under the CARES Act or similar hardship modification. A credit union can seek to recapture the deferred interest in a few ways, each of which has its own flaws for both the borrow and the credit union. This is placeholder text continue reading » This post is currently collecting data… ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NCUA headquarterslast_img read more