Why I Deleted Your Email

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now I deleted your email because you didn’t really send it to me. There was no personalization.  You didn’t look me up on LinkedIn. You didn’t even try to know me. You didn’t even try to connect on a personal level. You’re spamming me.I deleted your email because it didn’t provide any value. Instead of creating value before claiming any, you just tried to claim. You tried to schedule an appointment without telling me what was in it for me. There was no compelling value proposition. You’re boring me.I deleted your email because you don’t really believe I am your dream client. If you did, you would have picked up the phone and called me. You would have nurtured the relationship over time, continually trying to create value for me. You’re afraid to call me.I deleted your email because responding would allow you to believe that the prospecting method you chose is effective, that it leads to engagement, that it leads to a real conversation. The sooner you decide to take prospecting seriously, the sooner you produce the results you need. I don’t want to mislead you. You’re doing it wrong.This is why I deleted your email.last_img read more

Delhi woman kills 62-year-old handicapped mother-in-law

first_imgA 29-year-old woman allegedly killed her 62-year-old handicapped mother-in-law on Tuesday at their residence in Mandawali’s Shanti Nagar because she was “tired of being abused”. The accused was arrested on Wednesday, the police said.The police said Kanchan Kapoor first attacked her mother-in-law, Swarna Kapoor, with a wooden walker that the victim used. Then, to allegedly make it look like a murder committed by a third party, she attempted to burn the body with mustard oil.According to family members, Kanchan, who has been married to Swarna’s son Sumit since 2009, was always at loggerheads with the victim over domestic issues but mostly because the accused allegedly ill-treated her children.‘Violent person’Sumit, the sole bread winner of the family who works at a restaurant, said his wife was a “violent” person and that she never liked his mother. “My wife was very violent with our children and used to hit them a lot because of which my mother often rebuked her. Last night, it turned very ugly because of her bad temper and now my children and I have to suffer because of her,” he said, adding that he planned to divorce her soon.As told to Mr. Sumit by his children, Kanchan was beating one of them on her second floor residence. Swarna then shouted at her from the ground floor flat. Enraged, she came down and hit her mother-in-law after which she collapsed. The woman then brought a bottle of mustard oil and set her ablaze but only managed to burn parts of her legs and a few items in the room.last_img read more

Another milestone for Narain Karthikeyan

first_imgEnough, leave them alone…” Narain Karthikeyan is stomping around the pit in front of a banner with his face on it. He is climbing over tools and across equipment, through a swarm of mechanics dressed in the electric green and black of Speed NK Racing.Team Boss: Narain KarthikeyanQualifying hasn’t gone,Enough, leave them alone…” Narain Karthikeyan is stomping around the pit in front of a banner with his face on it. He is climbing over tools and across equipment, through a swarm of mechanics dressed in the electric green and black of Speed NK Racing.Team Boss: Narain KarthikeyanQualifying hasn’t gone well, one gear box seems possessed by an evil spirit, a clutch is throwing a tantrum, the team drivers are being instructed and interrogated, but Karthikeyan has called a time out. “Let them be. Now they just need to go out and drive.” It is the second round of the 10th JK Tyre National Racing Championships. Speed NK Racing, Karthikeyan’s outfit, lead in the standings amongst 14 cars at the Kari Motor Speedway outside Coimbatore, in a place signposted by the local panchayat as the “classical, divine Tamil township of Chettipalayam.”NK Racing CarThis is NK Racing’s second year in the championships, where they field two cars in the Formula Rolon Chevrolet class, the highest of the three classes involved. The other two are the Formula LGB Swift and the Formula LGB Hyundai. NK Racing’s drivers are Chennai teenagers Aditya Patel, 18, and Saran Vikram, 17, one the son of a former racer and the other of a garage mechanic. Two other drivers, Saahil Shelar from Mumbai and Ajay Kini from Chennai are part of the Amaron NK Racing Academy, and have been placed with the Chennai based WSRF team for the Rolons.Kamlesh Patel, father of Aditya with three decades of racing behind him, says the two NK Racing drivers have a “two in a billion opportunity” to work with a driver of Karthikeyan’s experience.India’s first Formula 1 driver is putting in the mandatory night shifts with race engineer and cousin Sanjay Balu and his team of 10 mechanics. They dissect drives in English and Tamil and stand over the cars as an open heart surgery is performed. Karthikeyan is in the mix measuring the track temperature, timing practice laps, the team always trying to squeeze just a bit more out of the car. “All you need to win,” says NK Racing team manager Yohann Setna, “is to be one hundredth of a second faster than the next guy.”NK with SaranFor the first time in his life, as a test driver for Williams F1, Karthikeyan, 30, is being paid to drive. There is a possibility of more F1 races. So why bother with 18-hour working days that do not guarantee that extra one-hundredth of a second? Karthikeyan says, “I wanted to start something in a small way, we had all the infrastructure in our workshop.” Until 12 years ago, a section of Perur Engineering Works, part of his father’s business, worked on cars the teenage rookie raced. Today that garage is buzzing again.Karthikeyan has worked his network of contacts to get his team what it needs, like F1 lubricants from Castrol. With Balu, he teaches rookies how to log every detail of a drive into their memories to use as feedback.Karthikeyan and Setna have designed a new easy-to-read set-up sheet for the pit team. The sheet logs the suspension and chassis set-up-tyre pressure, ride height/ ground clearance, angle of the tyres-which changes every time the car goes out, depending on the track surface and weather.The team was trimmed from four cars in the inaugural year to two and NK Racing estimates expenditure per car to touch Rs 10 lakh per season. Karthikeyan says, “The pressure to get the most out of two cars to get the wins is a lot more but management-wise two are much easier to handle”.Of their drivers from the first year, Akhil Khushlani now races in the Formula BMW Asia series. Talks are on with the Tata Racing School to set up an academy, the country’s first proper racing institution, to run out of Chettipalayam three months at time.The decision of India’s most famous driver, and most famous racing “brand”, to enter a team in the national championships should, you would imagine, be welcomed. But NK Racing faced some early sniping from envious opponents in season one.It could be, says Setna, because the team was determined to look and act like professionals. The mechanics, who had worked on jeeps and trucks, were trained to work on race cars, split into specialist groups, like electricals and gearbox. Fitness regimes were drilled into the rookies and they were given books on driving and engineering. The pit signage had to be smart, the team used walkie talkies, and occasionally, pit-to-car communication.Most importantly, the drives were free. It was the team and not the driver who found the sponsor to pay racing charges. (Over a six-round season, drivers must cough up Rs 35,000 for a Swift, Rs 45,000 for the Hyundai and Rs 1 lakh for the Rolon per round.) For contenders from non-racing families, it was a break from heaven. Shelar’s father Sanjay, a director in an engineering firm, says, “We have no tension about money, we don’t have to run around for sponsorship.” The Formula One Karthikeyan’s ChoiceIn Chettipalayam , Narain Karthikeyan was asked just one question. Would he take up The Offer? India’s first Formula One driver, now a test driver for Williams, has been approached by F1 team Spyker to race for them in the season’s last seven races. One of the lower-ranked teams on the F1 ladder, Spyker is familiar territory for Karthikeyan who raced with them in the 2005 season. Spyker is in fact the current incarnation of team Jordan, who signed Karthikeyan up for his F1 debut and for a brief period were also named Midland. Spkyer have recently sacked their German driver Christijan Albers and indicated their interest in the Indian. Karthikeyan is yet to take a decision on whether to return to a struggling team or keep the security of working with Williams. However due to new FIA rules, the time test drivers get on cars has been severely cut back. Karthikeyan says, “My racing instincts say I want to drive. After my experience as a tester at Williams, I think I can extract more out of an F-1 car now than I could.”As the race draws close, the pit gets calmer. The drivers are left to themselves, the engineers finish their job and leave it to the gods of the gearbox, and Karthikeyan heads off to watch. “Racing drivers… you need to treat them gently,” he says and he knows because at heart he is still one. In a sport about technology, aerodynamics and big bucks, the most precious part of a race car is still the driver, for whom spares are not easily found.Along with dozens of sponsors’ stickers, NK Racing cars sport the words “Aditya B+ve” and “Saran B+ve”. They read like inspirational revup slogans, but are actually the drivers’ blood groups, mandatory on every race car. All race tracks must have an ambulance and a fire truck on standby. On the weekend, nothing flammable catches fire, but Patel lights up. He finishes third in one race and wins the second, biding his time as two leaders engage in a charged skirmish. Before they have time to say, “Chettipalayam”, Patel slips past them on the inside.Every race is a sensory overload, a blur of metal and rubber, the howl of engines, the smell of gas but this is almost a cerebral performance. It comes from a skinny kid who looks like he belongs in the quietest corner of a library. His team is going mental; engineers leap up and down, applauding mechanics pour over the pit wall.Patel roars past the finish line and Karthikeyan smiles. It is not the smile seen on hoardings or on TV but a sunbeam at full throttle. He says, “Inside me, I’m really, happy I did this.”advertisementadvertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Englishman Stephen Constantine prepares Indian football team for Busan Asian Games

first_imgKick off: Stephen Constantine is Indian soccer’s hopeIs he a guus hiddink come to rescue Indian football from obscurity? Englishman Stephen Constantine, the new coach of the national football team, is preparing the country’s Under-23s for the Busan Asian Games in September.Those familiar with the soccer scene in India would,Kick off: Stephen Constantine is Indian soccer’s hopeIs he a guus hiddink come to rescue Indian football from obscurity? Englishman Stephen Constantine, the new coach of the national football team, is preparing the country’s Under-23s for the Busan Asian Games in September.Those familiar with the soccer scene in India would call it a thankless task. But the All India Football Federation (AIFF), which gave Constantine the top football job, is expecting the 39-year-old to up India’s rank from 23 out of 40 soccer-playing nations in Asia, and get a team sitting idle since the pre-World Cup qualifiers up and running for a string of major matches.Next month, Constantine’s boys will be in a six-nation tournament in Vietnam; then Busan, the 2003 Asian Cup and the Olympics the year after. “The team hasn’t played for a long time, so fitness is a concern,” says the new coach. “I will also be giving our players new ideas.”One of only two FIFA instructors in England, Constantine has coached teams in England, Cyprus, US and, more recently, Nepal.”He doesn’t have an exceptional CV,” says AIFF Honorary Secretary Alberto Colaco. “But he has an amazing will to succeed.”Just what the team needs.last_img read more