Planning permission granted for new Primary Care Centre in Donegal

first_imgThe new Primary Care Centre is one step closer to construction after planning permission was confirmed for the building at Drumlonagher, Donegal Town.A four storey Primary Care Centre and Ambulance Station is set to provide state of the art facilities for a wide range of services including GP Services, Public Health Nursing, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy and Speech & Language Therapy. Children and Adult Mental Health Services, Early Intervention Services, TUSLA, Dental Services and a new Ambulance base will also be available. The planning application was made by DHM Developments and Remcoll Ltd, and the centre will be constructed under public private partnership under agreement from the HSE. Pat the Cope Gallagher TD has welcomed the announcement that the centre has been given the go-ahead by Donegal County Council.Deputy Gallagher said: “The Primary Care Centre formed part of the previous programme for Government and is already committed to by the HSE; a great deal of preparatory work in terms of this development has already been carried out. I would expect construction works to commence as soon as possible as I do not anticipate any further delays in this project. It is important for Donegal Town and the surrounding areas that facilities such as this Primary Care Centre are provided. “This new state of the art health facility will be able to provide the highest possible health care services and provision which are required nowadays, it is an extremely worthwhile investment as such primary care centres elsewhere in Ireland have proven to be a massive success,” he concluded.Planning permission granted for new Primary Care Centre in Donegal was last modified: June 12th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Donegal TownDrumlonagherPrimary Care Centrelast_img read more

See Cape Town before you die!

first_img12 November 2002That’s the vote from viewers of the popular BBC travel programme “Holiday’. And on the other side of the Atlantic, readers of the biggest travel magazine in the US gave the thumbs-up to four of South Africa’s premier tourist destinations.It’s been a good week for SA tourism “products’. On Sunday night, “Holiday’ placed Cape Town fifth in its rundown of top destinations, “50 Places To See Before You Die’.Cape Town was the only city to be named in the top five, beating Sydney, New York, Venice and Paris – not to mention famed attractions like India’s Taj Mahal, Egypt’s Pyramids and Australia’s Ayers Rock.Over 20 000 BBC viewers named their “dream destination that both surprises and inspires’, with most votes going to the Grand Canyon, followed by Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, Florida’s Walt Disney World, and New Zealand’s South Island.For the BBC’s full report on Cape Town, along with country facts, tourist info and links, and reports on the full range of things to see and do in the city, click here.Conde Nast TravelerIn the same week, on the other side of the Atlantic, some 30 000 readers of the prestigious Conde Nast Traveler (US) voted in the magazine’s Top 100 Readers’ Choice Awards 2002, rating cities, resorts, islands, hotels and cruises according to criteria such as standard of rooms, service, food, location and service – and placed four of South Africa’s leading properties on its Top 25 list.The luxury Singita Private Game Reserve bordering the Kruger National Park scored top honours for the second consecutive year, and was named best resort in Africa and the Middle East, also sharing the World No 1 position as “The Best of the Best 2002′ with a luxury French hotel.Sun International’s five-star Table Bay Hotel in Cape Town was placed fourth, the exclusive Londolozi Game Reserve – also bordering the Kruger Park – was ranked 12th, and the Cape Grace Hotel in Cape Town came in at 24th position.Nor are these the only accolades South African tourism has received of late. In the Conde Nast Traveller UK Readers’ Awards, announced in September, South Africa ranked 10th overall in the world as a preferred travel destination, coming in first place for value for money.And in the same month, South Africa was rated as a preferred tourist destination by the French travel industry, with over 21 000 tour operators and retail agents giving the country the thumbs-up at TOP RESA, the annual travel and tourism trade show held in Deauville, France.The latest official tourism statistics also bear out the success of South Africa’s tourism strategy, confirming the country’s position as one of the best-performing destinations in the world.South African Tourism’s chief executive officer, Cheryl Carolus, described the awards as “well-deserved recognition of the immense commitment, made by all winners, to the continued growth and success of South Africa’s tourism industry, and clearly indicate the wealth of quality, value-for-money experiences that we as a country can offer visitors.’SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

Kids swap suburbs for township

first_imgBoys taking part in the exchange programme get a chance to attend a school that is very different to their own.“I went from a 10-roomed house in Rondebosch to a three-roomed house in Khayelitsha,” said Jem Wilson, one of a group of children from an elite Cape Town primary school who took part in a unique life-skills initiative.The Luleka Exchange Programme, set up over eight years ago, gives boys from Rondebosch Preparatory School in the upmarket Cape Town suburb of Rondebosch and boys from the no-fees state-run Luleka Primary School in Khayelitsha township a chance to spend a day in each others shoes.“Going to Luleka has really opened my eyes to seeing how differently people live,” Jem said.Rondebosch and Khayelitsha are very different places. The former is a residential suburb in the south of Cape Town city centre, nestling below Devil’s Peak and near the main campus of the University of Cape Town. Khayelitsha, on the other hand, is a sprawling semi-informal settlement on the wide plains of the Cape Flats, far from the affluence of the city.In past years the programme only saw boys from Luleka going to spend a day and night in Rondebosch. This year there was a proper exchange, with boys from Khayelitsha going to Rondebosch and Rondebosch boys going to Khayelitsha.The exchange, held in mid-September, kicked off with children and teachers from both schools having an evening get-together at Rondebosch Prep to break the ice. That night each of the Rondebosch kids hosted one of the Khayelitsha boys at their home. The next day the boys from Luleka Primary spent the day at Rondebosch Prep, after which they all left for Khayelitsha.The process was then repeated, with each Khayelitsha boy hosting one Rondebosch boy at their home for the night. The following day the Rondebosch pupils attended Luleka Primary School.Jordan Corfe from Rondebosch Prep was anxious about spending the night in Khayelitsha.“We hear all these horror stories about Khayelitsha, but when I started talking and walking around I soon got the feel of the place,” he said.His schoolmates also quickly learned that the township was not as bad as they had believed. “I didn’t expect that my perception of Khayelitsha was so wrong,” said Daniel Jollivet de Oliviera. “I thought that the crime would be worse than where I live, but our hosts have never been robbed before and they keep their doors open with confidence.“I was surprised at how [many] people my host knew. It seemed as if the whole family lived there, including aunties, cousins and grandparents. It is very community-based.“The Luleka exchange was an awesome experience.”Chris Verster, a teacher at Rondebosch Prep, said the programme is an extension of existing exchange initiatives at the school. “Our aim was for our boys to experience and understand a little bit of another culture,” he said. “We do a lot of interaction with other ‘of our own’ schools as well as two exchanges abroad, in England and Wales.“We hope for our boys to realise that there are other diverse cultures on our doorstep, that contribute to all of us being South African.”Thandi Matrose, a Luleka Primary School teacher, agrees that the programme helps expose children to other cultures.“We are not that different, even though we eat different food and do different things,” she said.She hopes the exchange will help break what she calls, “the cycle of inferiority, and the race barrier”. She believes that despite 15 years of democracy many black people, especially children in townships, still live with the misconception that white people are better and smarter. The exchange showed that that the children from Khayelitsha never expected to have so much in common with kids from a privileged neighborhood.“It was good to see that he showed respect to my parents,” said Luleka pupil Pabotse Lefatsa of his guest from Rondebosch. “You don’t always expect that from a white person.”Although the boys from both schools discovered they had much more in common than they expected, their experience of education was something else.“The boys from Khayelitsha were amazed by the technology at the school, especially the overhead projectors, and also by the sizes of the classrooms,” said Rondebosch pupil Michael Palframan.Describing Luleka Primary, Jett Rogerson from Rondebosch Prep said: “Their school was very different to ours. The teachers did not seem to care what the pupils did. We could walk around outside, you could throw things, and nothing happened. There was little discipline.”Andile Mamfengu from Khayelitsha said of Rondebosch Prep said: “The school was great, they have good discipline and the classes are also smaller. We have 40 kids in a class, they have only 20.”Verster said the two schools cannot really be compared. “We depend nearly entirely on parents’ school fees. Luleka is a no-fees school. The education department supply schools for basic education; we strive to maintain a school of excellence.”Nonetheless, both groups of boys agreed that the experience had taught them that their differences were mainly on the surface. Behind the privilege and the poverty they are much the same – for the most part, overcoming language and cultural barriers was as easy as grabbing a football.More than that, it broadened their view of human experience. As Rondebosch Prep pupil Michael Palframan said, “I thought this was Cape Town, but it is not. There is a whole other world out there.”last_img read more

Mike Lutmer, Sept. 12

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We’ve had a little too much rain. I have been trying to get some hay made and it has not been fun. Our third cutting looks really good and we have had enough rain for it to grow but our days are getting shorter and it has cooled down. The rains haven’t left much of window to cut and dry hay, but the longer we wait the shorter the days get and the closer we get to harvest.The rain has been great for the double-crop beans and I think they should be pretty good. The rain has been too late for some of the corn. It is drying down.I haven’t seen any disease problems going crazy yet in the corn. There is some corn standing very well but some of it around the county is pretty sketchy. Where the sandier soil is over by Carlisle they started shelling over there last week and corn is going down pretty badly. As a whole I think it is still standing alright, but in some places it is a concern.I have some beans that are lodging pretty bad because they were so tall.  When they dry down it may be an issue, but they look like they will yield really well. The double-crops are still dark green and well over knee high and thick.I think we are still three weeks out for harvest yet. The beans in the last four days have lost about a third of their leaves and the corn is starting to turn pretty quickly, but I think it will at least be the end of the month before we really get going.last_img read more

CourseSmart Brings Textbooks to Android

first_imgTags:#E-Books#E-Learning#web The future of textbooks is digital and a growing part of the digital economy resides with Android. CourseSmart, one of the largest providers of digital learning material, released an Android application April 19 to make e-textbooks more ubiquitous in the market.CourseSmart for Android 1.0 brings access to 90% of all core higher education textbooks in use in colleges and universities to Android users. Users can search for topics within a single book or by collection, add and edit notes and can be read in portrait or landscape modes. The Android version of CourseSmart comes a year-and-a-half after the iPhone version of the app came out and a year after the iPad version. The company looks to expand and add graduate degrees. It has been certified by TRUSTe, a leading Internet privacy service provider.CourseSmart is one of the biggest digital textbook providers in the game, but it is by no means alone. Inkling, a digital textbook startup, received a round of funding in late March with backing coming from legacy publishers McGraw-Hill and Pearson. Inkling is currently only available on the iPad.The elephant on the doorstep in anything e-publishing related though is Amazon. The online commerce giant announced today that users will soon be able to check out e-books from their local libraries and take notes in the margins. If Amazon, with its platform ubiquity across iOS, Android and Kindle devices, were to turn its full strength on the topic of digital textbooks and electronic inter-library loans it could be very disruptive to the model of any up-and-coming digital textbook suppliers.A recent study said that currently only 3% of all textbooks are digital but that the number is increasing, up to a possible 25% by 2015. dan rowinski Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

Why I Deleted Your Email

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now I deleted your email because you didn’t really send it to me. There was no personalization.  You didn’t look me up on LinkedIn. You didn’t even try to know me. You didn’t even try to connect on a personal level. You’re spamming me.I deleted your email because it didn’t provide any value. Instead of creating value before claiming any, you just tried to claim. You tried to schedule an appointment without telling me what was in it for me. There was no compelling value proposition. You’re boring me.I deleted your email because you don’t really believe I am your dream client. If you did, you would have picked up the phone and called me. You would have nurtured the relationship over time, continually trying to create value for me. You’re afraid to call me.I deleted your email because responding would allow you to believe that the prospecting method you chose is effective, that it leads to engagement, that it leads to a real conversation. The sooner you decide to take prospecting seriously, the sooner you produce the results you need. I don’t want to mislead you. You’re doing it wrong.This is why I deleted your email.last_img read more

Delhi woman kills 62-year-old handicapped mother-in-law

first_imgA 29-year-old woman allegedly killed her 62-year-old handicapped mother-in-law on Tuesday at their residence in Mandawali’s Shanti Nagar because she was “tired of being abused”. The accused was arrested on Wednesday, the police said.The police said Kanchan Kapoor first attacked her mother-in-law, Swarna Kapoor, with a wooden walker that the victim used. Then, to allegedly make it look like a murder committed by a third party, she attempted to burn the body with mustard oil.According to family members, Kanchan, who has been married to Swarna’s son Sumit since 2009, was always at loggerheads with the victim over domestic issues but mostly because the accused allegedly ill-treated her children.‘Violent person’Sumit, the sole bread winner of the family who works at a restaurant, said his wife was a “violent” person and that she never liked his mother. “My wife was very violent with our children and used to hit them a lot because of which my mother often rebuked her. Last night, it turned very ugly because of her bad temper and now my children and I have to suffer because of her,” he said, adding that he planned to divorce her soon.As told to Mr. Sumit by his children, Kanchan was beating one of them on her second floor residence. Swarna then shouted at her from the ground floor flat. Enraged, she came down and hit her mother-in-law after which she collapsed. The woman then brought a bottle of mustard oil and set her ablaze but only managed to burn parts of her legs and a few items in the room.last_img read more

Another milestone for Narain Karthikeyan

first_imgEnough, leave them alone…” Narain Karthikeyan is stomping around the pit in front of a banner with his face on it. He is climbing over tools and across equipment, through a swarm of mechanics dressed in the electric green and black of Speed NK Racing.Team Boss: Narain KarthikeyanQualifying hasn’t gone,Enough, leave them alone…” Narain Karthikeyan is stomping around the pit in front of a banner with his face on it. He is climbing over tools and across equipment, through a swarm of mechanics dressed in the electric green and black of Speed NK Racing.Team Boss: Narain KarthikeyanQualifying hasn’t gone well, one gear box seems possessed by an evil spirit, a clutch is throwing a tantrum, the team drivers are being instructed and interrogated, but Karthikeyan has called a time out. “Let them be. Now they just need to go out and drive.” It is the second round of the 10th JK Tyre National Racing Championships. Speed NK Racing, Karthikeyan’s outfit, lead in the standings amongst 14 cars at the Kari Motor Speedway outside Coimbatore, in a place signposted by the local panchayat as the “classical, divine Tamil township of Chettipalayam.”NK Racing CarThis is NK Racing’s second year in the championships, where they field two cars in the Formula Rolon Chevrolet class, the highest of the three classes involved. The other two are the Formula LGB Swift and the Formula LGB Hyundai. NK Racing’s drivers are Chennai teenagers Aditya Patel, 18, and Saran Vikram, 17, one the son of a former racer and the other of a garage mechanic. Two other drivers, Saahil Shelar from Mumbai and Ajay Kini from Chennai are part of the Amaron NK Racing Academy, and have been placed with the Chennai based WSRF team for the Rolons.Kamlesh Patel, father of Aditya with three decades of racing behind him, says the two NK Racing drivers have a “two in a billion opportunity” to work with a driver of Karthikeyan’s experience.India’s first Formula 1 driver is putting in the mandatory night shifts with race engineer and cousin Sanjay Balu and his team of 10 mechanics. They dissect drives in English and Tamil and stand over the cars as an open heart surgery is performed. Karthikeyan is in the mix measuring the track temperature, timing practice laps, the team always trying to squeeze just a bit more out of the car. “All you need to win,” says NK Racing team manager Yohann Setna, “is to be one hundredth of a second faster than the next guy.”NK with SaranFor the first time in his life, as a test driver for Williams F1, Karthikeyan, 30, is being paid to drive. There is a possibility of more F1 races. So why bother with 18-hour working days that do not guarantee that extra one-hundredth of a second? Karthikeyan says, “I wanted to start something in a small way, we had all the infrastructure in our workshop.” Until 12 years ago, a section of Perur Engineering Works, part of his father’s business, worked on cars the teenage rookie raced. Today that garage is buzzing again.Karthikeyan has worked his network of contacts to get his team what it needs, like F1 lubricants from Castrol. With Balu, he teaches rookies how to log every detail of a drive into their memories to use as feedback.Karthikeyan and Setna have designed a new easy-to-read set-up sheet for the pit team. The sheet logs the suspension and chassis set-up-tyre pressure, ride height/ ground clearance, angle of the tyres-which changes every time the car goes out, depending on the track surface and weather.The team was trimmed from four cars in the inaugural year to two and NK Racing estimates expenditure per car to touch Rs 10 lakh per season. Karthikeyan says, “The pressure to get the most out of two cars to get the wins is a lot more but management-wise two are much easier to handle”.Of their drivers from the first year, Akhil Khushlani now races in the Formula BMW Asia series. Talks are on with the Tata Racing School to set up an academy, the country’s first proper racing institution, to run out of Chettipalayam three months at time.The decision of India’s most famous driver, and most famous racing “brand”, to enter a team in the national championships should, you would imagine, be welcomed. But NK Racing faced some early sniping from envious opponents in season one.It could be, says Setna, because the team was determined to look and act like professionals. The mechanics, who had worked on jeeps and trucks, were trained to work on race cars, split into specialist groups, like electricals and gearbox. Fitness regimes were drilled into the rookies and they were given books on driving and engineering. The pit signage had to be smart, the team used walkie talkies, and occasionally, pit-to-car communication.Most importantly, the drives were free. It was the team and not the driver who found the sponsor to pay racing charges. (Over a six-round season, drivers must cough up Rs 35,000 for a Swift, Rs 45,000 for the Hyundai and Rs 1 lakh for the Rolon per round.) For contenders from non-racing families, it was a break from heaven. Shelar’s father Sanjay, a director in an engineering firm, says, “We have no tension about money, we don’t have to run around for sponsorship.” The Formula One Karthikeyan’s ChoiceIn Chettipalayam , Narain Karthikeyan was asked just one question. Would he take up The Offer? India’s first Formula One driver, now a test driver for Williams, has been approached by F1 team Spyker to race for them in the season’s last seven races. One of the lower-ranked teams on the F1 ladder, Spyker is familiar territory for Karthikeyan who raced with them in the 2005 season. Spyker is in fact the current incarnation of team Jordan, who signed Karthikeyan up for his F1 debut and for a brief period were also named Midland. Spkyer have recently sacked their German driver Christijan Albers and indicated their interest in the Indian. Karthikeyan is yet to take a decision on whether to return to a struggling team or keep the security of working with Williams. However due to new FIA rules, the time test drivers get on cars has been severely cut back. Karthikeyan says, “My racing instincts say I want to drive. After my experience as a tester at Williams, I think I can extract more out of an F-1 car now than I could.”As the race draws close, the pit gets calmer. The drivers are left to themselves, the engineers finish their job and leave it to the gods of the gearbox, and Karthikeyan heads off to watch. “Racing drivers… you need to treat them gently,” he says and he knows because at heart he is still one. In a sport about technology, aerodynamics and big bucks, the most precious part of a race car is still the driver, for whom spares are not easily found.Along with dozens of sponsors’ stickers, NK Racing cars sport the words “Aditya B+ve” and “Saran B+ve”. They read like inspirational revup slogans, but are actually the drivers’ blood groups, mandatory on every race car. All race tracks must have an ambulance and a fire truck on standby. On the weekend, nothing flammable catches fire, but Patel lights up. He finishes third in one race and wins the second, biding his time as two leaders engage in a charged skirmish. Before they have time to say, “Chettipalayam”, Patel slips past them on the inside.Every race is a sensory overload, a blur of metal and rubber, the howl of engines, the smell of gas but this is almost a cerebral performance. It comes from a skinny kid who looks like he belongs in the quietest corner of a library. His team is going mental; engineers leap up and down, applauding mechanics pour over the pit wall.Patel roars past the finish line and Karthikeyan smiles. It is not the smile seen on hoardings or on TV but a sunbeam at full throttle. He says, “Inside me, I’m really, happy I did this.”advertisementadvertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Englishman Stephen Constantine prepares Indian football team for Busan Asian Games

first_imgKick off: Stephen Constantine is Indian soccer’s hopeIs he a guus hiddink come to rescue Indian football from obscurity? Englishman Stephen Constantine, the new coach of the national football team, is preparing the country’s Under-23s for the Busan Asian Games in September.Those familiar with the soccer scene in India would,Kick off: Stephen Constantine is Indian soccer’s hopeIs he a guus hiddink come to rescue Indian football from obscurity? Englishman Stephen Constantine, the new coach of the national football team, is preparing the country’s Under-23s for the Busan Asian Games in September.Those familiar with the soccer scene in India would call it a thankless task. But the All India Football Federation (AIFF), which gave Constantine the top football job, is expecting the 39-year-old to up India’s rank from 23 out of 40 soccer-playing nations in Asia, and get a team sitting idle since the pre-World Cup qualifiers up and running for a string of major matches.Next month, Constantine’s boys will be in a six-nation tournament in Vietnam; then Busan, the 2003 Asian Cup and the Olympics the year after. “The team hasn’t played for a long time, so fitness is a concern,” says the new coach. “I will also be giving our players new ideas.”One of only two FIFA instructors in England, Constantine has coached teams in England, Cyprus, US and, more recently, Nepal.”He doesn’t have an exceptional CV,” says AIFF Honorary Secretary Alberto Colaco. “But he has an amazing will to succeed.”Just what the team needs.last_img read more