Not all face masks equally effective in curbing COVID-19 transmission: Health Ministry

first_imgHowever, he noted that it was highly advisable to add an extra layer inside of a cloth mask to ensure a higher degree of protection.Furthermore, a cloth mask may only be used for a maximum of three hours, at which point the wearer must replace the mask, given that the material tends to absorb droplets from the mouth, he added.Read also: Government to step up mask-wearing campaign amid rising COVID-19 casesAchmad went on to advise the public against wearing masks made of neoprene fabric – often marketed as “scuba” masks – as well as multifunctional headwear or buff masks. “[Scuba and buff masks] do not meet the [health] requirements.”According to the ministry, the chance of COVID-19 contagion might be reduced to as low as 1.5 percent when both the virus carrier and a healthy individual wear masks.The ministry’s mask-wearing policy has previously become a major point of contention, however, when Minister Terawan Agus Putranto initially only advised sick people to wear masks amid the rush of panic-buying at the onset of the pandemic.At the time of writing, the ministry’s office in Kuningan, South Jakarta is the largest virus cluster in the capital.Topics : The Health Ministry has called on the public to use only masks that actually protect them against the coronavirus, explaining that not all masks are made equal.The ministry’s disease control and prevention general director, Achmad Yurianto, said in a statement issued on Monday that three types of masks were specifically designed to prevent the wearer from transmitting and contracting diseases, including COVID-19.“One is the N95 mask, a standard-issue mask typically worn by health workers who directly handle viruses in the laboratory. The others are the surgical mask and cloth mask,” said Achmad.last_img read more

Men ‘biologically wired’ to care for children

first_imgFrom the Telegraphin the UKA study found that men’s testosterone levels fell by around a third in the days and months after their partner gave birth. The more caring side of a man’s character emerged as levels of the hormones fell, said scientists, who believe that the process is nature’s way of trying to ensure that fathers stay for the long haul of child–rearing.They found that men with higher testosterone levels – associated with dominant and aggressive behaviour – were both more likely to secure a partner and father children. But after the birth itself testosterone levels in these men dropped.“Humans are unusual among mammals in that our offspring are dependent upon older individuals for feeding and protection for more than a decade,” said Christopher Kuzawa, a faculty fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University in Chicago, and a coauthor of the study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “Raising human offspring is such an effort that it is cooperative by necessity, and our study shows that human fathers are biologically wired to help with the job.”last_img read more

Russian Ambassador to Guyana tours Banks DIH Limited

first_imgDuring a recent visit to the corporate head office of Banks DIH Limited, Russian Ambassador to Guyana, Alexander Kurmaz and the beverage company’s Chairman and Managing Director, Clifford Reis were engaged in fruitful discussions as they officially met for the first time.From right: Banks Chairman and Managing Director Clifford Reis in discussion with Ambassador Alexander Kurmaz in the Rotunda at Thirst Park as Mrs Kurmaz looks onThe Russian delegation comprised the Ambassador’s wife and third secretary of the Embassy of the Russian Federation, Dmitry Kornilov.Opportunities of mutual benefit were among some of the topics discussed, during a simple lunch attended by the company’s Operations Director Michael Pereira, Human Resources Director Andrew Carto and Engineering Services Director Shabir Hussain.Ambassador Kurmaz was also taken on a guided tour of the company’s rum factory and soft drink plant by the executives.last_img read more