PPP Commissioners slam lack of transparency

first_imgGECOM system– insist publication of nominator lists a statutory obligationThe People’s Progressive Party (PPP) commissioners at the Guyana Elections Commission (GECOM) are unhappy with the lack of accountability at that entity; and this is especially since there are just 43 days to go before Local Government Elections are held.Those commissioners, in an interview with this publication, made it clear that there are times when requests for information get them nowhere. One problem identified by Commissioner Sase Gunraj is the manner in which meetings are held.“You’ve heard in the media us complaining and saying things recently about the quality of the meetings, the discussions, the timing of the meetings; and thoseThe publication of the nominator lists, according to the commissioners, is a necessitystatements are not very complimentary of GECOM,” he said.“Because the meetings are truncated in terms of time, the discussions, sometimes even though they may be long-winded, do not end in implementable decisions,” Gunraj said. “And generally, at the commission level, it’s as though you have to squeeze blood out of stone to get what is happening.”According to Gunraj, those commissioners perceive the operations at the commission level are running on a need-to-know basis.Elaborating on the way meetings are held, PPP Commissioner Bibi Shadick compared what obtains now to the days of former Chairman Steve Surujbally, who demitted office in 2017.“Statutory meetings are held on Tuesdays and are supposed to start at one o’clock. From the first day, the Chairman announces that he’s not going beyond certain hours. First it was five o’clock. Then it came up to four o’clock. Then, if something is being discussed and the Chairman doesn’t (want to stay), he gets up,” she explained.“This has happened on more than one occasion. The thing about it is the commission under Surujbally was long hours, but at least we didn’t have a chairman that used to get up and walk out. This now is happening,” she declared.Retired Justice James Patterson was appointed GECOM Chairman late last year. The commission would be holding Local Government elections on November 12. Already, much controversy has surrounded the elections, including political parties accusing each other of submitting fraudulent lists on Nomination Day.ListsMeanwhile, Gunraj also addressed concerns about the publication of the candidates and backers’ lists. While Government officials have suggested that this should not have been done at all, Gunraj has insisted that the law makes it necessary.“All that is done for elections are a statutory process. Included in that process is that, upon receipt of the lists by the Returning Officer on Nomination Day within the specified period, they are required by law to post that list in a conspicuous place outside the RO office. That was done,” he said.“In fact, myself and other commissioners looked at this exercise at various RO offices throughout the Coast. I was on the East Coast; I know Commissioner Shadick was on the East Bank. I was also at Critchlow Labour College, where it was attended by a large media contingent (and) in person by the Minister of Communities and the Chairman of GECOM.”Gunraj noted that all those officials had observed the process, and he denied claims that the lists were published because of the PPP Commissioners.At a recent Alliance for Change (AFC) press conference, it was reported that that party’s Campaign Manager, David Patterson, had compared publicising of the lists to opening a can of worms. But according to Gunraj, the transparency it afforded highlighted electoral fraud.“It is an outcome of the viewing of these lists that all these issues have now arisen. People started to complain that they never signed lists. People started to complain that they did sign lists, but were duped into so doing,” he said.“They were told they were signing for better roads or old age pension. Another one I heard was they was listing persons to join a Community Policing Group. All of those are instances of fraud,” Gunraj said, adding that no right thinking person should countenance such things.last_img read more

Dancing Divabot performs on stage w Video

first_img Developed by the country’s biggest public research organization, Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), the new variant of HRP-4, the female robot HRP-4C deemed “Divabot,” has a realistic face, movable features and even mimics human-sounding breaths. The robot utilizes two primary technologies, using a real singer as a model. Researchers recorded the model’s every move as she sung a Japanese song. They used VocalListener to synthesize the singing voice on the computer, and imitate the singing voice. For the facial expressions, they used a new technology, Vocawatcher, which studies a person singing to replicate the expressions naturally. They then mapped the data onto HRP-4C and voila–Diva-bot was brought to life.A member of the institute said they want to create a new content industry with the technology. Diva-bot’s intricate software creates complicated movements such as jumping, dancing and even balancing. Using a mouse, those with zero robotic expertise are meant to find Diva-bot easily operable, which may or may not be a good thing considering how complex the robot is.Comparable to the software commonly used in CG character animation, Diva-bot’s positioning can be controlled by clicking on the different parts and dragging them to the desired position, creating a sequence of key poses that the software generates, making the robot move. Explore further Citation: Dancing Divabot performs on stage (w/ Video) (2010, November 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-11-divabot-stage-video.html Introducing Japan’s new singing robot (w/ Video) (c) 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — A singing, dancing humanoid recently joined a live group of dancers to perform. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more