Manganiyar singer thrashed to death in Rajasthan village; families flee homes

first_imgAbout 20 families belonging to the Manganiyar community of folk musicians have fled their native village in Jaisalmer district of Rajasthan after a community member was allegedly beaten to death following a dispute over a ritual in a local temple. The folk singer was held responsible for failure of a temple ritual.A faith healer, Ramesh Suthar, who belongs to the ‘Bhopa’ (exorcist) clan, had claimed that Amad Khan (45) had failed to perform a specific melody at the temple in Dantal village during the Navratra festival, because of which the spirit of the temple goddess did not enter his body. He allegedly thrashed the singer and broke his musical instruments.Suthar allegedly entered the house of Khan, along with some accomplices on September 27 night and assaulted him again, leading to his death. Police have arrested Suthar and launched a hunt for two other accused after registering a murder case under Section 302 of Indian Penal Code.The frightened Manganiyar families have fled Dantal village and about 200 persons are camping at Balad, 20 km away, under the police protection. Some of them shifted to the Jaisalmer town earlier this week and are staying at a night shelter near the railway station.Though the police have assured them of security if they return to their native village, Manganiyars claim that they were being threatened by the dominant Rajput and Suthar castes. Gunasar Lok Sangeet Sansthan president Baksh Khan said the Manganiyars expected the district administration to help in their rehabilitation.last_img read more

Meghalaya mine mishap: No change in water level

first_imgThe multi-agency operations to rescue the miners in Meghalaya failed to make any headway on Thursday, with efforts to pump the water out of the mine not yielding any result. The divers of the Navy and the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) were not able to resume the search operation for the 15 trapped miners as they could not go inside due to the high water level. Asked if the divers would take another chance later in the day, operation spokesperson R Susngi told PTI that they would wait, but there was a remote chance of the water level reducing so soon. The 15 miners remain trapped in the 370-foot-deep illegal rat-hole coal mine in Lumthari village of East Jaintia Hills district since December 13 after water from a nearby river gushed in. The operation to rescue them entered the 22nd day on Thursday. Fire service personnel from Odisha resumed work at 10 am and it was found that the water level has risen again, a day after full-day pumping resulted in it receding by 16 inches, Mr. Susngi said. One more pump will be put to use at the mine on Thursday and another would will be installed at an abandoned mine, about 100 metres away, he said. Meanwhile, the high-powered submersible pump from Coal India is yet to begin work, three days after it arrived at the site. Preparation is still going on to get the pump operational, Mr. Susngi said. The spokesperson had said divers would resume operation once the water level at the main shaft decreases to about 100 feet from its current level of over 160 feet. Authorities said there were at least 90 abandoned mine shafts in the area and they were full of water. Rescuers believe that these nearby mines might be interconnected and draining out water in these mines could help in reducing the water level in the main shaft.last_img read more

July 18 2008 Photo text sa Th

first_imgJuly 18, 2008 [Photo & text: sa] The June 15. workshop participants graduated. Congratulations to: [from left] Lindsay Marsh, Todd Findley, Brendan Siegl, Tyler Scott, Toa Rivera, Mark Moynihan, TJ Bogan, Jonathan Schafer, Rebecca Brown, Mateo Mir Bashiri and Magda Lojewska. [Photo & text: sa]last_img