Meghalaya mine mishap: No change in water level

first_imgThe multi-agency operations to rescue the miners in Meghalaya failed to make any headway on Thursday, with efforts to pump the water out of the mine not yielding any result. The divers of the Navy and the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) were not able to resume the search operation for the 15 trapped miners as they could not go inside due to the high water level. Asked if the divers would take another chance later in the day, operation spokesperson R Susngi told PTI that they would wait, but there was a remote chance of the water level reducing so soon. The 15 miners remain trapped in the 370-foot-deep illegal rat-hole coal mine in Lumthari village of East Jaintia Hills district since December 13 after water from a nearby river gushed in. The operation to rescue them entered the 22nd day on Thursday. Fire service personnel from Odisha resumed work at 10 am and it was found that the water level has risen again, a day after full-day pumping resulted in it receding by 16 inches, Mr. Susngi said. One more pump will be put to use at the mine on Thursday and another would will be installed at an abandoned mine, about 100 metres away, he said. Meanwhile, the high-powered submersible pump from Coal India is yet to begin work, three days after it arrived at the site. Preparation is still going on to get the pump operational, Mr. Susngi said. The spokesperson had said divers would resume operation once the water level at the main shaft decreases to about 100 feet from its current level of over 160 feet. Authorities said there were at least 90 abandoned mine shafts in the area and they were full of water. Rescuers believe that these nearby mines might be interconnected and draining out water in these mines could help in reducing the water level in the main shaft.last_img read more

Jivin’ Jets Jolt Colts, 20-7

first_imgTweetPinShare0 Shares INDIANAPOLIS — Darrelle Revis’ new team is getting the same results he’s always had against Andrew Luck.The veteran cornerback is still mystifying the young quarterback.Revis picked off one pass, recovered two fumbles and helped the suddenly opportunistic Jets defense come up with five turnovers again the night of Sept. 21 to help New York pull away for a 20-7 victory at Indianapolis.“It’s Monday night, on a big stage, and we knew what type of game this was going to be,” Revis said.So he delivered a prime-time performance.Revis’ homecoming has been everything New York fans hoped for. With Revis and Antonio Cromartie locking down outside receivers, first-year coach Todd Bowles has been able to rely on his defensive front to stop the run and routinely pressure quarterbacks.In the opener against Cleveland, New York converted five turnovers into 21 points.Against the supposedly, high-powered Colts offense, they did it again. The Jets matched that five-turnover total, kept the Colts out of the end zone for three full quarters and never gave Luck a chance to get comfortable. The result: New York is off to its first 2-0 start since 2011.“The name of the game is turnovers and keeping the score down, regardless of whatever else happens,” Bowles said.Indianapolis (0-2) is keeping its dismal start in perspective.After starting last season with back-to-back losses, they won five straight.This time seems different. Luck was 21 of 37 for 250 yards with one touchdown, three interceptions and lost one fumble.After a strong start, Frank Gore finished with 15 carries for 57 yards and Donte Moncrief was the only receiver to top the 50-yard mark. Moncrief caught seven passes for 122 yards and Indy’s only touchdown.Part of the problem was Revis and his teammates.The other problems were self-inflicted. Indy was called for 11 penalties, Gore bobbled a handoff at the Jets 1-yard line that Revis recovered in the end zone, Adam Vinatieri missed a 29-yard field goal — the first time he’s missed one from shorter than 30 yards since 2007 — and for the first time since 1997, the Colts were shut out in the first half in back-to-back weeks.Indy has scored just 21 points in eight quarters, and inside the stadium, the fans who roared for Robert Mathis’ return and Jeff Saturday’s induction into the ring of honor, booed heartily as the mistakes piled up.“You can’t penalize yourself, you can’t turn the ball over,” Colts coach Chuck Pagano said. “We have to protect, give him (Luck) a clean pocket. You can’t drive the length of the field and put the football on the ground.”The Colts’ problems began early.On Indy’s first series, Calvin Pryor intercepted a pass and ran it back to the Colts 9-yard line. Four plays later, Ryan Fitzpatrick threw a 6-yard TD pass to Eric Decker.Fitzpatrick finished 22 of 34 for 244 yards with two touchdown passes and one interception — getting his first career win at Lucas Oil Stadium. Fitzpatrick became the first player since 1950 to start five consecutive road games against one team while playing for five different teams. He was 0-4 in the previous starts.Eric Decker had eight receptions for 97 yards before leaving with a knee injury, and Brandon Marshall caught seven passes for 101 yards and one touchdown.But it was defense that ruled the day.“All we talk about is trying to dominate as a defense and we take a lot of pride in that,” Pryor said. “Our main focus is to come in week in and week-out, bring the intensity, try to dominate as a defense, create turnovers, get the ball back to our offense and let them go execute.The Jets struggled to put this one away, though. New York couldn’t score again until Nick Folk made a 35-yard field goal late in the first half.Indy finally got on the board with Luck’s 26-yard TD pass to Moncrief with 10:07 left in the game.Fitzpatrick answered on the next series with a 15-yard TD pass to Marshall and Marcus Gilchrist’s late interception set up Folk’s final field goal.“As a secondary we’re trying to be the best we can be and be the best secondary unit in the league,” Revis said. “That’s what we’re trying to showcase out there.”(MICHAEL MAROT, AP Sports Writer)last_img read more

Inside the Wholesaler Distribution Dynamic

first_imgWhile readers of my blog often contact me with intriguing and sometimes unexpected information or ideas, it isn’t often that anyone brings up topics that I don’t think I already know something about.Larry Scheur succeeded in doing that in a recent series of communications.Larry is a real old-time independent wholesaler from Buffalo New York. He created “The Buffalo System,” which pioneered the use of title- and retailer-specific formulas into order regulation. And he asserts that NO ONE truly understands the economics of magazine distribution from the wholesaler standpoint. Based on what he’s been telling me, that is certainly an assertion that applies to me.What the wholesalers are saying about being unable to make money under existing conditions, Larry told me, is absolutely true. In fact, he says, wholesalers rarely—if ever—made money from sales. Profits, he says, came from “service charges, retailer under claims, retailer bankruptcies, return over claims, shortages, unreported overages, and special deals with national distributors.”Naturally I—like anyone who’s been in newsstand distribution for enough years—had heard rumors of some irregularities in the old days of our business; but the concept that these irregularities might be so institutionalized as to provide the very basis of the survival of our business was (and is) astonishing to me. Larry, however, was willing to provide many examples.“A highly respected EVP of a major national distributor once took to me to lunch,” he offered. “He said he would approve all my affidavits, no matter what the claim, for a 10 percent fee. I was shocked and upset. He called after me as I ran from the restaurant, ‘It’s all right, I already have three wholesalers on board.’” The Buffalo System was, Larry tells me, the first single-entry returns system. The purpose of the single-entry system is to ensure that the total (bulk) sales on the wholesaler system reconcile with the sales tracked by individual retail outlet. As an example, Larry told me about a wholesaler whose system showed two programs. One was designated “OverReturn” and the other was named “ShortReturn.” OverReturn added the totaled retailer returns for a title and issue and compared it to the wholesaler bulk record file for the same title/issue. If the retailer returns were higher, the program added a compensating amount to the bulk record for processing to the ND. The ShortReturn program functioned similarly. If the O&R returns totaled less than the bulk return, the program determined the missing amount and either created a stock account or multiplied returns over a determined number by the factorial difference.Improvements in auditing and tracking must have cleaned up these irregularities to a fair degree, though Larry maintains there is still an element going on today. Although, he admits, there were some wholesalers—Bob Cohen of Hudson News was one—who kept everything strictly above-board. “He wanted everything legit,” Larry said. “A very clean system.”Regardless of what may have happened in the wild-west days of magazine distribution, the situation is considerably more precarious today. I told Larry about a consultant who contacted me with to talk about “Plan B”—code for, “how are we all going to keep our jobs?” This consultant asked, “Even with all of the recent technology, how are returns going to be handled if, as some people have suggested, we bypass the wholesaler? What happens to the affidavit? Can the retailers scan returns the way the wholesalers can? And doesn’t setting up direct relationships give the retailer a license to steal?”Larry thinks there are possible direct-distribution-based solutions to our current predicament; and to put them in place he suggests, as another former independent wholesaler did not long ago, going “back to the future.” His suggestions:1) Re-implement the once highly successful Family Circle/Woman’s Day direct model, devoid of national distributor involvement, utilizing cross-docking. (Cross-docking is a term used in shipping logistics that involves moving product from truck-to-truck without the intermediate warehousing; WalMart has used it to move retail product since the 1980s).2) Similarly, Larry suggested, the industry should take a look at the once highly controversial Kresge/TV Guide system. This system, Larry explained, was similar to the Family Circle/Woman’s Day model, with the addition of expedited delivery. “TV Guide printed on Saturday and shipped 20 million copies with over 170 editions to wholesalers expecting Monday on sale,” Larry explained. “TV Guide made deals with national chains—Kresge, Neisners, F.W. Woolworths, W.T Grants, etc.—that were not typically wholesaler serviced. They required the wholesaler to deliver the predetermined allotment as well as collect the unsolds (if any) for a small fee paid by TV Guide. A store stamp verified delivery. As some of these stores were in rural areas, wholesalers sometimes used busses and trains, hiring a delivery agent in these areas. A reship allowance was paid by Triangle Publications to wholesalers providing this service.  These solutions, I thought, appear tailored to the large general-interest publications whose day has come and gone. What about the special interest publications and the independent publishers?Systems today, Larry pointed out, are also tailored around those mass-market publishers. “Look at the Order & Regulation systems,” he said. “Prior to UPCs, only 10 percent of titles were tracked issue by issue. Comparatives worked. They built the crosswords category. Wholesalers maintained O&R on the top two or three crosswords and used those sales to determine retail store allocations for the rest of the line.”What does that mean for the special-interest publisher? I asked. Was he expressing the idea that a more targeted publisher can be hurt by over-regulation?But Larry was talking about more than a publisher or a publication. His point was that a whole category—a whole industry—can be hurt by over-regulation. “O&R destroyed comics,” he said. “You start a downward trend which then negatively affect allocations. Thirty percent sell through—what you get with the niche publications—needs no O&R. Look at history, and you will see how it works.”last_img read more

Great Grand Masti Masti 3 Will leaked movie dampen hopes of a

first_img“Great Grand Masti” (“Masti 3″) is one of the five Hindi films that earned huge revenues for Balaji Telefilms in broadcasting and music deals, hence it will be interesting to see the Riteish Deshmukh-Urvashi Rautela starrer’s box office collection when it releases this Friday (July 15).This is so because the film was leaked online and High Definition (HD) prints were available for download, much to the detriment of the producer Balaji Telefilms, the film and television content company listed on Indian stock exchanges.”Great Grand Masti”, “Udta Punjab”, “Azhar”, “Flying Jat”, “Half Girlfriend” and “XXX” were listed as films by the company that had contributed substantially to its revenues.”Successfully closed revenue deals on 5 movies with key broadcasters, overseas and music deals for upcoming movies at Rs. 682.5 million,” the company said in its presentation posted on BSE website on May 18. It had listed “Azhar” as a co-produced movie, so it is presumed that the Rs. 682 million deal excludes the biopic.The makers of the adult comedy “Great Grand Masti” were forced to advance the release date by a week to July 15 after the print of the film — starring Riteish Deshmukh, Vivek Oberoi, Aftab Shivdasani and Urvashi Rautela in key roles — were leaked online. The leaked print had the water mark “censor copy” and could hit big box office collection prospects on release. The leak evoked outrage on Twitter, with several Bollywood celebs expressing annoyance at repeated instances of films being leaked online before their official release. The police have taken cognizance of the offence, with the crime branch of Mumbai police arresting nine persons under the Copyright Act. However, some people, after watching the leaked version are not impressed; while one had tweeted that the film is “disasppointing with its plot”, another comment described it as “pathetic & worthless”. #GreatGrandMasti to now release on 15th July.— taran adarsh (@taran_adarsh) July 6, 2016Shares of Balaji Telefims closed at Rs. 100.75 apiece on the BSE on Tuesday, almost flat from their Monday close.Hindi films are big money spinners, as is evident from two recent blockbusters — “Sultan” featuring Salman Khan and the multi-starrer “Housefull 3”.last_img read more

2 killed as Maitree Express hits truck

first_imgDhaka-bound Maitree Express hits a sand-laden truck at Dakshin Khan area in Gazipur on Sunday morning. Photo: Prothom AloTwo persons were killed and two others injured after a train hit a truck at Dakshin Khan area in Gazipur on Sunday morning, reports UNB.The deceased are Soleman Hossain, a resident of Uttara, and Jakir Hossain, a resident of Netrokona.Tongi fire service station officer Atiqul Islam said Dhaka-bound Maitree Express hits the sand-laden truck around 4:45am, killing Jakir on the spot.The truck had broken down while crossing the tracks.Locals rescued injured Soleman and took him to a local hospital. He died while being shifted to the Dhaka Medical College Hospital.On information, two units of Tongi fire service rushed in and took part in the rescue operation.last_img