Why I Deleted Your Email

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now I deleted your email because you didn’t really send it to me. There was no personalization.  You didn’t look me up on LinkedIn. You didn’t even try to know me. You didn’t even try to connect on a personal level. You’re spamming me.I deleted your email because it didn’t provide any value. Instead of creating value before claiming any, you just tried to claim. You tried to schedule an appointment without telling me what was in it for me. There was no compelling value proposition. You’re boring me.I deleted your email because you don’t really believe I am your dream client. If you did, you would have picked up the phone and called me. You would have nurtured the relationship over time, continually trying to create value for me. You’re afraid to call me.I deleted your email because responding would allow you to believe that the prospecting method you chose is effective, that it leads to engagement, that it leads to a real conversation. The sooner you decide to take prospecting seriously, the sooner you produce the results you need. I don’t want to mislead you. You’re doing it wrong.This is why I deleted your email.last_img read more

How To Know If You Are a Dependent

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now You weren’t hired so that someone could tell you what to do. If you were hired by someone who wants to tell you what to do and how to do it, then you have made an enormous mistake in your choice of employer. If this is what you want, your employer has made an enormous mistake by hiring you.You wait for assignments: If you wait for your manager, supervisor, or leader to tell you what you need to do, then you are a dependent. An independent person would proactively recognize what needs to be done and take action. An independent would get things done even if they went weeks or months without ever bumping into their leader. If you wait to be told what to do, you are a dependent.You wait for directions: If you are waiting for directions you are a dependent. You don’t need to know how to do everything your job entails. You are allowed to ask for directions. And that’s what’s important here, that you go and ask for directions. If you need an answer, go get the answer and then get busy. Waiting is what a dependent would do.You aren’t learning to do your job: Every company should spend more time, money, and energy training their people. But they don’t often have all of the resources they would like to have in order to train everyone on everything they need to know. A dependent waits for training, believing it is someone else’s job to insure their success. Independent people go straight to Google, and with a few keystrokes figure out what they need to do. If you ask for someone else to do something for you more than once, you are a dependent.You are not developing yourself for your next job: A dependent believes that time served is enough to deserve the job one level up from theirs, and there was a time when this might have been true. Someone who is independent asks for additional responsibility and notches themselves up to the next level, and the next level, and the one after that. If you aren’t growing into your next role, you are a dependent, waiting for someone else to tap you on the shoulder and gift you more money.You do only what is required: A dependent does only what is required. They don’t try to improve any project or assignment they work on. They do the bare minimum, hoping that they can skate by with mediocre outcomes, trying to stay off the radar. A person who is independent always finds a way to add value to whatever they are charged with doing. If you do as little as you can, you are a dependent.The person responsible for leading you shouldn’t feel that they should be allowed to claim you as a tax deduction. You weren’t hired to be someone’s dependent.last_img read more

Do the Work You Are Capable Of

first_imgOne summer I was invited to work for the husband of a family friend. The job was mindless, something anyone could do. It was also repetitive and mindless. But the pay was pretty good for a teenage kid, and I needed the money.I worked harder than anyone around me. I also worked faster than anyone around me. I was doubling and tripling the output of the full time employees, and it was not going unnoticed. The managers and supervisors were impressed, and they praised my work, even though I did not believe there was anything exceptional to what I was doing.At break, a number of the full time employees cornered me. They told me to slow down to the pace of the rest of the workers there. They told me that I was making them look bad, and that they were being paid for that level of production, so they weren’t going to work any harder.I was too young to know how to handle it, and I was intimidated by a group of much older people cornering me to insist I slow down. So, I ended up finding a way to work by myself, and at my own pace.Up until this point, I wasn’t aware that this mindset existed.Here’s the thing. When you do only the minimum work you are capable of, you will only be paid the minimum amount commensurate with that work. Withholding the real value you can create only ensures that you are never earn what you are capable of earning.The full time employees believed they were punishing the company by producing less than they were capable of, but in reality, they were taking money out of their pockets.A poor mindset leads to poor activities and poor results. Do the work you are capable of. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Wife, paramour held for man’s murder in Ganjam

first_imgThe Ganjam police has solved the murder of a man whose body parts were recovered from different areas with the arrest of his wife and her lover on Saturday.According to the police, Rina Sahu (35), wife of Koko Sahu (40), had committed the murder with with help of her paramour Sunil Pradhan on March 31. One of their sons was the witness to the murder, police sources said. Sunil is a distant relative of Rina.A torso was recovered near Mardarajpur on April 2. During the next few days, chopped hands and legs were located from nearby areas. On April 10, a severed head was found near the Dengapadar canal. As there was no missing person complaint, the local police were unable to identify the victim. The victim was finally identified when his brother Golak Sahu filed a complaint with the police regarding his missing brother. The police had taken Rina into custody on May 10 for interrogation. During interrogation, she spilled the tbeans about the gruesome murder, which led to the arrest of her paramour.Illicit relationshipAccording to Sub-Divisional Police Officer (SDPO) Dilip Das, who monitored investigation of the case, Rina had developed relationship with Sunil as her husband was a migrant worker in Surat. After returning home in March, her husband had come to know about their illicit relationship and warned them to refrain from it. It had irked Rina and Sunil, who had decided to murder Koko.Another caseEarlier this month a similar case had come to fore in Ganjam district. Decomposed body of Laxmi Narayan Patra (38) from Mohana of Gajapati district was recovered from a locked rented house at Ankushpur village on May 4. Investigation revealed that he had been murdered on April 7 by his wife Jamuna Patra and her paramour Narayan Sahu. Both of them have been arrested.last_img read more

UP BJP leaders vent ire at SP MP Naresh Agrawal

first_imgA day after senior Samajwadi Party leader Naresh Agrawal made a controversial statement about Hindu gods in Parliament and later apologised, BJP leaders in Uttar Pradesh filed several complaints, demanding his arrest and registration of an FIR against him for hurting their sentiments.The convenor of the BJP’s State traders’ cell, Vineet Sharda, announced a reward of ₹1.25 lakh for anyone who blackens Mr. Agrawal’s face and shaves his head. Mr. Sharda along with Mayor of Meerut Municipal Corporation Harikant Ahluwalia and other BJP workers demanded Mr. Agrawal’s arrest. Also Read Uproar over MP’s remark on Hindu gods  Later, they went to the Partapur police station in Meerut and registered a complaint demanding police action against the Samajwadi Party MP.last_img

Delhi woman kills 62-year-old handicapped mother-in-law

first_imgA 29-year-old woman allegedly killed her 62-year-old handicapped mother-in-law on Tuesday at their residence in Mandawali’s Shanti Nagar because she was “tired of being abused”. The accused was arrested on Wednesday, the police said.The police said Kanchan Kapoor first attacked her mother-in-law, Swarna Kapoor, with a wooden walker that the victim used. Then, to allegedly make it look like a murder committed by a third party, she attempted to burn the body with mustard oil.According to family members, Kanchan, who has been married to Swarna’s son Sumit since 2009, was always at loggerheads with the victim over domestic issues but mostly because the accused allegedly ill-treated her children.‘Violent person’Sumit, the sole bread winner of the family who works at a restaurant, said his wife was a “violent” person and that she never liked his mother. “My wife was very violent with our children and used to hit them a lot because of which my mother often rebuked her. Last night, it turned very ugly because of her bad temper and now my children and I have to suffer because of her,” he said, adding that he planned to divorce her soon.As told to Mr. Sumit by his children, Kanchan was beating one of them on her second floor residence. Swarna then shouted at her from the ground floor flat. Enraged, she came down and hit her mother-in-law after which she collapsed. The woman then brought a bottle of mustard oil and set her ablaze but only managed to burn parts of her legs and a few items in the room.last_img read more

Manganiyar singer thrashed to death in Rajasthan village; families flee homes

first_imgAbout 20 families belonging to the Manganiyar community of folk musicians have fled their native village in Jaisalmer district of Rajasthan after a community member was allegedly beaten to death following a dispute over a ritual in a local temple. The folk singer was held responsible for failure of a temple ritual.A faith healer, Ramesh Suthar, who belongs to the ‘Bhopa’ (exorcist) clan, had claimed that Amad Khan (45) had failed to perform a specific melody at the temple in Dantal village during the Navratra festival, because of which the spirit of the temple goddess did not enter his body. He allegedly thrashed the singer and broke his musical instruments.Suthar allegedly entered the house of Khan, along with some accomplices on September 27 night and assaulted him again, leading to his death. Police have arrested Suthar and launched a hunt for two other accused after registering a murder case under Section 302 of Indian Penal Code.The frightened Manganiyar families have fled Dantal village and about 200 persons are camping at Balad, 20 km away, under the police protection. Some of them shifted to the Jaisalmer town earlier this week and are staying at a night shelter near the railway station.Though the police have assured them of security if they return to their native village, Manganiyars claim that they were being threatened by the dominant Rajput and Suthar castes. Gunasar Lok Sangeet Sansthan president Baksh Khan said the Manganiyars expected the district administration to help in their rehabilitation.last_img read more

Two troopers of 18 Assam Rifles killed in Manipur blast

first_imgTwo troopers of 18 Assam Rifles were killed and six others injured in a bomb blast in Manipur’s Chandel district near the India-Myanmar border on Monday, sources in the police said.Suspected insurgents detonated a remote-controlled bomb on the roadside near the District Collectorate at 6 a.m. and Rifleman Indra Singh was killed on the spot, while Rifleman Sohalal died of his injuries within hours.The troopers, along with armed guards, were on their morning jog. Additional forces from neighbouring districts have been rushed to launch a massive combing operation.No outfit has yet claimed responsibility for the attack.last_img

Arvinder Singh Lovely rejoins Congress

first_imgFormer Delhi Congress president Arvinder Singh Lovely, who had switched over to the BJP in April last year, rejoined the Congress party on Saturday in the presence of the party’s Delhi in-charge P.C. Chacko and the present chief of Delhi Congress Ajay Maken Before the photo opportunity at the 24 Akbar Road headquarters of the Congress party, Mr. Lovely met party president Rahul Gandhi at his residence. He told the media that “he had left the party in pain”. I was an ideological misfitThough he didn’t elaborate, it was well known that he left because of his differences with Mr. Maken, who had replaced him [Mr. Lovely] as the party’s Delhi unit chief. “I was an ideological misfit in the BJP,” said Mr. Lovely during the brief interaction with the media after his re-induction into the Congress. His one time mentor and Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit said that she is happy at Mr. Lovely’s homecoming.The development comes barely a couple of days after Mr. Maken and Ms. Dikshit addressed a joint press conference against the AAP government’s third anniversary in Delhi in an effort to show a picture of unity.The Delhi unit of the Congress has witnessed factionalism with both Ms. Dikshit and Mr. Maken openly blaming each other for the party’s debacle in the 2015 Assembly election where it didn’t win a single seat.last_img read more

‘Cong., BJP nexus with miners is clear’

first_imgThe Aam Aadmi Party’s Goa unit has criticised the BJP-led ruling coalition and the Congress over the proposed all-party delegation to raise the issue of mining ore licenses with central ministers in New Delhi.In a press release issued here AAP leader Siddarth Karapurkar questioned the “nexus” between the ruling and opposition parties in planning the Delhi meeting to urge the Union Mines Minister Narendra Singh Tomar and Transport Minister Nitin Gadkari to “find out means and ways so that mining operations in the State were not affected due to Supreme Court order”.The Supreme Court has directed that all mining activities on 87 cancelled leases be stopped from March 15.Mr. Karapurkar called it as yet another case of a friendship between the Congress and BJP and its alliance partners to sell the interests of the State to a few miners. AAP also lamented that the absence of a responsible opposition in the legislature is strikingly visible.The AAP has alleged that a few MLAs of both parties, whose stakes in the mining business is no secret, are grouping together in the name of this all-party delegation to New Delhi.Mr. Karapurkar demanded that the people of Goa must know what dialogue this delegation will have with the Central Ministers and people must also know what are the advantages and disadvantages of such a course for the State.“Mining resource is a wealth of the people,” he asserted and lamented that the all-party delegation, was “surely carrying a brief of a select few who have been enjoying the mining wealth of the State hitherto as payback for the funding they have been receiving for their political careers.”The AAP leader pointed out that while the senior-most Minister in the government, Sudin Dhavlikar, had in justification of their proposed Delhi delegation, said the State faces a loss of ₹3,500 crore and the ban will affect 2 lakh people, he has not spoken of who is going to recover the “loot of the mining wealth as estimated by Justice (retd) M. B. Shah Commission in its report on illegal mining. Why is there no clarity on that?” he asked.last_img read more

International Yoga Day: Rajasthan creates Guinness record

first_imgRajasthan created a world record on Thursday by bringing more than a lakh people together at a yoga session.Two representatives from Guinness World Records watched as yoga guru Baba Ramdev put the gathering, which included Rajasthan Chief Minister Vasundhara Raje, through a series of asanas. The international private organisation then handed over a certificate to Ms. Raje and Baba Ramdev, saying it had been the largest gathering worldwide of people performing yoga. Enthusiasts perform yoga during an event to set the Guinness World Record for the largest yoga lesson during the International Day of Yoga at Kota in Rajasthan on June 21, 2018.  | Photo Credit: PTIlast_img

Ruckus in Haryana Assembly

first_imgThe Haryana Assembly Monday witnessed an hour-long ruckus during the Zero Hour when Speaker Kanwar Pal disallowed INLD’s adjournment motion on the SYL canal issue, following which the opposition members staged a symbolic walkout from the House. As soon as the Zero Hour began, INLD’s senior leader Abhay Singh Chautala, who is also the Leader of Opposition in the Assembly, sought to know from the Speaker the fate of his party’s adjournment motion moved over non-completion of the Sutlej Yamuna Link canal. However, the Speaker disallowed the motion, saying “the matter is sub-judice and therefore, cannot be taken up in the Assembly for debate.” Dissatisfied with his reply, Mr. Chautala said, “There is no issue concerning SYL which is pending before courts.” Congress’ Karan Singh Dalal said, “Employees of various departments are protesting on the streets, but the government has invoked ESMA to crush their democratic right to protest.” Mr. Chautala also made a mention of the Essential Services Maintenance Act (ESMA), saying “it has been invoked to create fear among employees so that they do not raise their voice in the future”. “How can this (SYL) be disallowed…there is nothing pending before court. Is SYL issue not important? Should it not be discussed in the House. First and foremost, this issue should be taken up,” Mr. Chautala said.Slogans against govt. Later, the Indian National Lok Dal members raised slogans against government. The Congress MLAs raised slogans and dubbed the government as “anti-farmers, anti-traders and anti-employees“. As the ruckus in the House continued, the INLD members staged a symbolic walkout to protest their adjournment motion on SYL being disallowed.last_img read more

Sajad Lone’s party to contest J&K polls

first_imgSajad Lone’s Peoples Conference on Friday became the first regional party to announce its participation in the coming urban local bodies and panchayat polls in J&K. “The Peoples Conference will take part in the upcoming elections. But given the rules, we won’t have a common symbol,” he tweeted.BJP allyMr. Lone became an ally of the BJP after the 2014 polls and served as a Minister with portfolios of Animal Husbandry, Social Welfare and Renewable Energy.Unlike the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) and the National Conference, Mr. Lone, son of assassinated Hurriyat leader Abdul Ghani Lone, maintained a studied silence on the issues of Article 35A, which defines State-subject laws, and the special status of J&K. The PDP and the NC boycotted the polls accusing the Centre of linking Article 35A with upcoming polls before the Supreme Court, which is hearing a number of petitions challenging the Article.The CPI(M), the JD(U), the BSP, the Awami National Party and the Democratic Party Nationalist also decided to stay away from these elections. So far, the Congress and the BJP have decided to field candidates in the polls, which will start from October 8 for urban local bodies.last_img read more

Meghalaya mine mishap: No change in water level

first_imgThe multi-agency operations to rescue the miners in Meghalaya failed to make any headway on Thursday, with efforts to pump the water out of the mine not yielding any result. The divers of the Navy and the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) were not able to resume the search operation for the 15 trapped miners as they could not go inside due to the high water level. Asked if the divers would take another chance later in the day, operation spokesperson R Susngi told PTI that they would wait, but there was a remote chance of the water level reducing so soon. The 15 miners remain trapped in the 370-foot-deep illegal rat-hole coal mine in Lumthari village of East Jaintia Hills district since December 13 after water from a nearby river gushed in. The operation to rescue them entered the 22nd day on Thursday. Fire service personnel from Odisha resumed work at 10 am and it was found that the water level has risen again, a day after full-day pumping resulted in it receding by 16 inches, Mr. Susngi said. One more pump will be put to use at the mine on Thursday and another would will be installed at an abandoned mine, about 100 metres away, he said. Meanwhile, the high-powered submersible pump from Coal India is yet to begin work, three days after it arrived at the site. Preparation is still going on to get the pump operational, Mr. Susngi said. The spokesperson had said divers would resume operation once the water level at the main shaft decreases to about 100 feet from its current level of over 160 feet. Authorities said there were at least 90 abandoned mine shafts in the area and they were full of water. Rescuers believe that these nearby mines might be interconnected and draining out water in these mines could help in reducing the water level in the main shaft.last_img read more

In Rajasthan, 10 lakh farmers identified for loans in next crop cycle

first_imgThe Congress government in Rajasthan has identified a whopping 10 lakh farmers for grant of loans through cooperative banks during the next crop cycle, amid allegations by the Opposition BJP that its “populist measure” of farm-loan waiver had failed to extend the benefit to the eligible agriculturists and led to scams in several districts. State Cooperative Minister Udai Lal Anjana said here on Saturday that the cooperative debt structure was being strengthened for the benefit of farmers who would get the loans without mortgaging their land. Farmers getting themselves biometrically registered under the scheme would be given preference in the loan disbursement, he said. The farm loans will be disbursed in two stages during the next crop cycle of kharif season from April 1 to August 31 and rabi season from September 1 to March 31. Mr. Anjana said the loan recipients would also get the benefit of other schemes operated by the Cooperative Department. The BJP has alleged that the loan waiver scheme, announced by the State government without the Cabinet’s approval, was not clear about the eligible farmers and the process of implementation. BJP State president Madal Lal Saini said the “loan scams” had come to light in several districts, where the loans were picked up in the name of farmers who had never received the amount. The Congress government had announced loan waiver for farmers up to Rs.2 lakh each, resulting in the burden of an estimated Rs.18,000 crore on the Exchequer, on December 19, 2018, two days after being sworn in. The Congress had promised to tackle agrarian distress during its campaign for the 2018 State Assembly election. The entire short-term loans taken by small and medium farmers from cooperative and land development banks without any monetary ceiling and the debts up to Rs.2 lakh due on November 30, 2018, for the defaulter farmers who had obtained loans from nationalised, commercial and rural banks was to be waived in the scheme’s first phase. Registrar of Cooperative Societies Niraj K. Pawan said the farmers who had become members of village cooperative societies several years ago would be among the beneficiaries selected for the crop loan disbursement scheme.last_img read more

Communal divide to the fore in Asansol

first_imgFor a city with a centuries-old history of mining coal and producing steel, a gate at the entrance to Asansol, describing it as the “City of Brotherhood”, was scarcely noticed by residents and passers-by until a few years ago. However, after March 2018, the message put up by the city’s civic body is not only hard to miss but also presents the paradox the city is grappling with.In March 2018, Asansol burnt in hatred. Over 26 years after the city witnessed a divide along communal lines post-Babri Masjid demolition, the city appeared to be divided again. People were killed and prohibitory orders remained imposed for weeks as riots broke out over processions during Ram Navami. As the constituency gears up for polls on April 29, 2019, the fault lines of the communal divide seem more pronounced.Days before the polls, Trinamool Congress nominee Sreemati Dev Varma (Moon Moon Sen) had several events lined up earlier this week on Monday. At a crossing on the Domohani Road in Ward No. 31 of the Asansol Municipal Corporation, the 65-year-old actor made a brief speech to a crowd of a few hundred, largely comprising women and children.“The sound of azan from your mosque is the same as that of shlokas from the Gita,” she began. “Will you vote for those who want to divide us,” she asked in an apparent reference to the BJP.Ms. Sen, who represented Bankura Lok Sabha seat in 2014, had no hesitation in telling the audience that she is not familiar with Asansol and was contesting as per the wishes of her party chief and West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee. Her speech was replete with references to her mother, Bengali screen legend Suchitra Sen. Asked about her chances here, Ms. Sen’s reply reflected the wit of a politician: “Ask me what are the chances of Mamata Banerjee becoming Prime Minister and I will tell you its cent per cent.”Challenges galore The arithmetic of the last Assembly polls, held three years ago, may be with the TMC — it had won five of the seven seats in the Asansol LS constituency. But there are other challenges for the party. A TMC MP from Kolkata admitted that prime among them was of keeping the party’s flock together. This was one of the reasons why an outsider was given the ticket.Defending the seat is Union Minister of State Babul Supriyo. The singer-turned-politician’s greatest weapon this election is a song that has already courted a lot of controversy. Beyond the open coal mines of Raniganj where people can be seen carrying coal — mostly smuggled from the mines — on bicycles and their heads under the scorching sun, Mr. Supriyo is in the midst of a very busy campaign. As his convoy passes through Pandabeshwar, his supporters distribute booklets on the work he has done in the past five years, with his song playing in the background. Refuting the Election Commission’s reservations about the song, Mr. Supriyo expressed happiness at the over one lakh views it had notched on the Internet. “Why will you vote for Moon Moon Sen who is asking for votes in the name of her dead mother? What about the living and their problems?” he told a small gathering. While reminding people to play his song, the MP also raised slogans of ‘Jai Shri Ram’ during his campaign.Corruption from coal and freedom to allow religious processions found echoes in the words of Prime Minister Narendra Modi when he addressed the public meeting at Polo Grounds in Asansol the very next day (Tuesday). Just on the other side of the railway tracks, where the Prime Minister addressed the public meeting, Noorani Masjid and its adjoining areas still bear the scars of last year’s violence. “There was an unfortunate incident last year. What happened then should not recur any time in the future,” said Maulana Imdadullah Rashidi, referring to the riots. The cleric’s 16-year-old son was killed in the riots but he defused the situation with love, threatening to leave the city if members of the community targeted others.Another flare-upEarlier this month, a communal flare-up was also reported at Barakat in Asansol over a Ram Navami procession when authorities had to intervene, make arrests and suspend Internet services in the area. Imam Rashidi tried to downplay the incident. “There were some rumours in Barakat. Everything is quiet now. Elections will come and go. Asansol needs to, and will return to, where it was before 2018,” he said, his voice reflecting the same sanity and reason he had put forth a year ago.For Imam Rashidi, Asansol is really the city of brotherhood. “We are brothers living together here for centuries. Those who are used to hate will never realise what brotherhood means,” he said.last_img read more

Podcast: Smelling the Opposite Sex, Mysterious Lines in the Desert, and Surviving the Dinosaur Apocalypse

first_imgSmelling the Opposite Sex, Mysterious Lines in the Desert, And Surviving the Dinosaur Apocalypse Do certain smells influence our perceptions of gender? What was the purpose of ancient white lines in the Chilean desert? And how did birds survive the dinosaur apocalypse? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science’s Sarah Crespi.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) 00:0000:0000:00last_img read more

Podcast: Tanning addiction, veggie-eating Neandertals, and more

first_imgIs tanning addictive? Did Neandertals eat their veggies? And would a volcanic eruption make you move?Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science’s Sarah Crespi.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Ozone-depleting chemical still seeping into atmosphere

first_imgThanks to the Montreal Protocol, which brought the major causes of ozone depletion such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) under control, the ozone hole over Antarctica is healing, and global ozone levels are expected to return to 1980 levels by about 2050. But recent studies have found that a lesser known ozone depleter, carbon tetrachloride, isn’t going away as fast as it should be. The substance persists, scientists now suggest, because an unidentified source is still emitting it into the atmosphere.“Most of the Montreal Protocol–controlled gases are decreasing in the atmosphere in exactly the way we had anticipated that they would decrease,” says atmospheric chemist John Pyle of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, who was not involved in the new study. “[There may be] leaks into the atmosphere from old refrigerators but essentially they’re all behaving exactly as we would have expected … with the exception of carbon tetrachloride.”The Montreal Protocol, the 1989 treaty intended to phase out emissions of ozone-destroying chemicals, is widely considered one of the most successful international agreements, with near-global participation. Every year, signatory countries are required to report to the U.N. Environment Programme their imports, exports, and production of eight groups of controlled ozone-depleting chemicals. To keep an eye on how well the controls are working, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) measures atmospheric levels of these substances every 4 years, as mandated by Article 6 of the Protocol.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)But scientists preparing the 2010 WMO assessment noticed a curious thing. The primary ozone depleters—CFCs (previously used as refrigerants, propellants, and solvents) and halons (used in portable fire extinguishers)—are decreasing in the atmosphere just as expected based on countries’ production reports. But another substance, carbon tetrachloride, is lingering in the atmosphere longer than expected from the reported production numbers.“It’s a nasty little compound,” says Paul Newman, an atmospheric chemist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “It’s toxic, carcinogenic, ozone-depleting, and a greenhouse gas.” It’s also completely humanmade and has been used as a solvent, a cleaning agent, and a chemical feedstock to help synthesize other chemicals such as hydrofluorocarbons (which are potent greenhouse gases but not ozone depleters).Although developing countries were allowed to delay their phaseout of “carbon tet,” it was banned in 2010. And expected emissions based on reported production and feedstock usage after about 2007 were zero. Models based on those expected emissions numbers and on the lifetime of the compound in the atmosphere estimate that its level should be decreasing by about 4% each year. But the WMO data showed that it was decreasing by only 1%.One possible explanation for the discrepancy, Newman says, is that scientists have been underestimating how long the molecule sticks around in the atmosphere. The other possibility is that there’s another source sending the compound into the air.Since the 2010 report, Newman says, “there’s been a big effort to look at the lifetime in the atmosphere of carbon tetrachloride.” It’s known to be at least 25 years—long enough for the gas to distribute evenly around the globe. In that case, measurements of carbon tetrachloride in North America and Australia ought to be equal, assuming there are no new emissions. But they aren’t. The WMO report noted that the amount of the compound was significantly higher in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere.“It turns out we can use the gradient to determine what global emissions ought to be,” Newman says. He and his colleagues ran a number of climate simulations to quantify those emissions. They varied how much of the gas would be absorbed by the ocean or soils and how much might be emitted in each hemisphere, and they considered different estimated lifetimes of the gas. In the end, they simply couldn’t reconcile the observed decline with the reports of zero emissions. Instead, about 31,000 tonnes per year of carbon tetrachloride must still have entered the atmosphere from 2007 to 2012, they report online this week in Geophysical Research Letters.  “If you take a train with 100 tanker cars of carbon tetrachloride derailing once a month, that’s how much is being emitted,” Newman says. “That’s a lot.” The question is “Where’s this stuff coming from? We really don’t know.”Illegal production of carbon tetrachloride is one possibility—but not the only one, he notes. Another potential source is brownfields, old chemical disposal sites from which the gas is still leaking into the air. Yet another alternative is the ongoing use of carbon tetrachloride as a feedstock to produce other compounds; the process should destroy it, but some could be leaking out of production facilities. “But if there’s a lot of leakage, that’s money [the companies] are losing. We don’t have a good handle on that leakage, but we think it’s small,” Newman says. Even washing machines might be a source. Trace amounts of carbon tetrachloride can be produced by combining sodium hypochlorite and soap. “That would be a very, very tiny amount. But times all the clothes washers in the world, that could be a source also,” Newman says.Identifying potential sources is tricky because carbon tetrachloride “is kind of an unusual molecule,” says A. R. Ravishankara, an atmospheric chemist at the University of Colorado, Boulder, who was not involved in the new study but who was a co-chair of group that produced the 2010 WMO report (with Newman and Pyle). “It may be being produced in ways that we don’t understand.” The lifetime remains another question mark, Ravishankara says. The new paper removes some uncertainty and estimates an atmospheric lifetime of 35 years rather than 25 years. But Ravishankara says the molecule is different from CFCs in that it “has some removal processes that are kind of weird. It gets a little more difficult.”  And, he adds, “it would also help to be more confident about the emissions numbers reported from countries participating in the Montreal Protocol. It would not be such a bad idea to ask for better accounting.”Newman stresses that his findings do not imply that the Montreal Protocol has failed. Levels of carbon tetrachloride are falling—albeit more slowly than they should—and that’s because of the treaty, he says. And even the fact that scientists are focusing on these additional sources is a victory. “It’s had two successes here: [Carbon tetrachloride] is going down, and we’re looking into what could be an additional source.”Ravishankara agrees, noting that “the key point is that carbon tetrachloride contributes about 10% to the ozone depletion rate right now, so it’s not like other things are not working.” And, Pyle notes, “the overall story of the Montreal Protocol is still that it’s massively successful. What this paper is doing is saying we now understand [the discrepancy] discussed 4 years ago.”The next WMO assessment of ozone-depleting gases in the atmosphere is slated to come out in about a month, Ravishankara says, although the study was published too late to be included.last_img read more

Underground experiment confirms what powers the sun

first_imgScientists have long believed that the power of the sun comes largely from the fusion of protons into helium, but now they can finally prove it. An international team of researchers using a detector buried deep below the mountains of central Italy has detected neutrinos—ghostly particles that interact only very reluctantly with matter—streaming from the heart of the sun. Other solar neutrinos have been detected before, but these particular ones come from the key proton-proton fusion reaction that is the first part of a chain of reactions that provides 99% of the sun’s power.The results also show that the sun is a remarkably steady power source. Neutrinos take only 8 minutes to get from the sun’s core to Earth, so the rate of neutrino production that the team detected reflects the amount of heat the sun is producing today. It just so happens that this is the same as the amount of energy now being radiated from the sun’s surface, even though those photons have taken 100,000 years to work their way from the core to the surface. Hence, the sun’s energy production hasn’t changed in 100 millennia. “This is direct proof of the stability of the sun over the past 100,000 years or so,” says team member Andrea Pocar of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.The core of the sun is a fiery furnace so hot and dense that protons—nuclei of hydrogen, the sun’s main constituent—slam together with such force that they fuse, producing a deuterium nucleus (heavy hydrogen, made of a proton and a neutron) plus an antielectron and a neutrino. This is the start of a whole sequence of reactions: Protons collide with deuterium to produce helium-3; helium-3s combine to give helium-4 plus protons; other reactions produce lithium, beryllium, and boron. Many of these reactions produce neutrinos, but the vast majority of the neutrino flux from the sun is produced by the original proton-proton, or pp, reaction. “The pp reaction is the most basic process. Everything that goes on in the sun stems from it,” says Steve Biller of the University of Oxford and U.K. spokesperson for the SNO+ neutrino detector under construction in Canada, who was not involved in the new work.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Researchers have been detecting neutrinos since the 1960s. Initially, a two-thirds deficit in the detection rate confused the results. It turned out that neutrinos could transform from one type to another as they fly through space, but detectors were sensitive to only one of the three types. Once this “neutrino problem” was resolved, neutrino observatories went on to detect neutrinos from almost all the predicted reactions in the sun—but not the pp reaction. What makes the pp reaction hard is that the neutrinos have very low energy that is about the same as the energy of various radioactive decays that happen on Earth, making it easy for an earthbound detector to confuse a decay with a neutrino event. “Detecting neutrinos of this kind is an almost impossible thing to do. You need very low background levels and a lot of patience,” Biller says.The Borexino detector at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, 1400 meters below the Italian Apennines, is made up of a spherical transparent vessel filled with 300 tonnes of highly pure pseudocumene, a benzenelike liquid. Neutrinos pass easily through the overlying rock, but occasionally one will hit a nucleus in this “scintillator” liquid, producing a flash of light that is detected by an array of detectors positioned all around the sphere. Such detectors are always situated deep underground, to protect them from cosmic rays, and are surrounded by buffer layers of liquids to fend off radioactive decays in the rocks.Despite these efforts, to detect pp neutrinos the Borexino collaboration had to go through an especially lengthy purification campaign to reduce the levels of radioactive contaminants in the scintillator liquid—particularly krypton-85, a byproduct of nuclear testing and reprocessing that now pervades the atmosphere and produces a decay signal very similar to that from the arrival of a pp neutrino. “Any tiny air leak and krypton-85 will get inside,” Pocar says. The researchers, Biller says, “really pushed the cutting edge, achieving ridiculously low levels of radioactive contamination.”There followed a year and a half of data collection and a year of analysis “to show it was not background or a detector effect,” Pocar says. After painstakingly removing multiple sources of background signals, the team was left with a neutrino flux of 66 billion per square centimeter per second, close to the standard solar model prediction of 60 billion, they report online today in Nature.“They did a stellar job in doing this—incredibly impressive,” Biller says. “They’re peeling back the branches to get to the trunk of the main process.”last_img read more