Fuse announces $25,000 service grant program

first_imgFuse LLC,Fuse, a marketing agency that helps brands reach teens and young adults, is proud to announce the launch of an annually occurring Service Grant Program. Fuse will donate $25,000 in services to a to-be-selected charity program within the action sports community.”In the past fifteen years, Fuse has supported many great non-profits through donations and by providing pro bono or discounted work. It has been a rewarding experience and we are now excited to expand our community involvement through this new grant program,” said Brett Smith, Partner at Fuse. “This project will provide a substantial grant to a deserving non-profit and allow Fuse to continue its dedication to community service.”Existing non-profit programs within the action sports community, as well those with new charity ideas connected to action sports, are encouraged to apply. The application deadline is October 15, 2011.”As an agency that has our roots in action sports, Fuse is excited to give back to the community,” said Issa Sawabini, Partner at Fuse. “Fuse’s goal is to continue to support non-profits that are associated with action sports and who are tirelessly involved in aiding the community.”Grant selection will be based on the applicants’ positive impact on American youth and on Fuse’s ability to make a difference through its work. The grant winner will be announced on November 15, 2011 and grant-funded work will take place in 2012. More information and the online application can be found at facebook.com/FuseLLC.About Fuse: Fuse is a youth culture marketing agency founded in 1995. The agency connects brands with teens and young adults through sports, music, fashion, video gaming and other relevant cultural interests. Fuse’s services include brand strategy, public relations, event marketing, design, social media and digital services. The Fuse staff, led by Partners Brett Smith, Bill Carter and Issa Sawabini, is comprised of marketing professionals and cultural experts who have worked for some of the most prominent brands and agencies in the country. Fuse has experience working with clients in product categories including action sports, beverages, snacks, footwear, auto, higher-ed and finance. In addition to the Service Grant Program, Fuse’s community initiatives include a donation program, community engagement committee, donation matching, staff leadership in community projects, monthly group volunteer projects and paid time off for volunteering. In 2011, Fuse was named one of Outside magazine’s “Best Places to Work” in the US. For more information, visit fusemarketing.com, facebook.com/FuseLLC or twitter.com/fuse_marketing.BURLINGTON, VT–(Marketwire – August 15, 2011) –last_img read more

Trail Mix: The Barter Theater Jams in January

first_imgBen Sollee plays January Jams in Abingdon’s Barter Theater on Friday.I have been fortunate to attend many wonderful dramatic productions at the venerable Barter Theater in Abingdon. Virginia’s official state theater, the Barter opened in 1933 with a peculiar caveat – if patrons couldn’t afford the 35 cent admission price, they could barter their way in with homegrown produce. It was a win/win situation – locals got to see the plays and the actors were plied with farm fresh vittles. While I have never been lucky enough to trade a few tomatoes or cucumbers for a seat inside, I have happily taken my seat to watch the cast of the Barter Theater perform some incredible plays – To Kill A Mockingbird, Tarzan, and A Christmas Story are but three of the shows I have seen there.Despite my familiarity with the comfortable confines of the Barter Theater, I was unprepared for what I experienced last weekend. For lack of a better term, the Barter was rockin’.For the last three years, a concert series – January Jams – has taken up residency at the Barter when the theater’s cast takes the month off from performing. Promoted by the town’s Convention & Visitor’s Bureau and the Abingdon Main Street program, January Jams has brought some tremendous artists to perform in the theater. Last year, among others, Marty Stuart, Iris Dement, St. Paul & The Broken Bones, and Jason Isbell were on the bill. This year’s line up has been similarly impressive – Jill Andrews, formerly of the everybodyfields, and David Bromberg have already performed, while Mavis Staples and Greensky Bluegrass have shows upcoming.Last Saturday night, it was only fitting that the iconic Barter Theater played host to a collection of icons. The Blind Boys of Alabama, an unparalleled institution in gospel music that has been touring for much of the last seven decades, along with rising blues star Jarkeus Singleton, took the near capacity crowd on a spiritual journey of the music of the Deep South. This was my first time attending a January Jams show and I was much impressed with how this classic theater morphed into a first class music room. Without a doubt, the Barter ranks up there with some of my favorite theaters around the region, which includes the Jefferson Theater in Charlottesville, the Paramount Centre in Bristol, and the Tennessee Theater in Knoxville. The Barter is intimate, bordering on cozy, with just 500 seats, the sound was great, and the theater has already developed a reputation for supplying artists with warm and appreciative audiences.Sara Cardinale, as the town of Abingdon’s Special Events Coordinator, has been instrumental in the development and growth of January Jams. To her, the concert series is a special event that serves dual purposes.“Here at the Convention & Visitor’s Bureau, we believe that a good community event is a good tourist event. An event that makes the community happy will make a tourist happy. The goal is to have more feet on the street.”Cardinale was effusive when talking about getting live music in the Barter Theater.“The Barter Theater puts on over one hundred shows a year, but January is their time to rehearse for next year, so there aren’t any shows going on. We decided to try to keep something happening in the theater, and that is how January Jams was born. Not having to drive to Asheville to hear great live music is pretty excellent, and the caliber of musicians who have come and been delighted by our little town is awesome.”Brent Treash, an Abingdon resident and avid live music fan, echoes these sentiments.“January Jams has quickly become woven into Abingdon’s social fabric. Enthusiastic crowds are able to see legendary musicians perform in a historic theater that rarely hosts live music. Because Abingdon is now embracing live music, I get to see these amazing musicians playing virtually on my back porch.”This weekend, January Jams wraps up its month of shows with two tremendous offerings. On Saturday, the aforementioned jamgrass heavyweights Greensky Bluegrass and Virginia folk rockers The Last Bison will play.On Friday, noted folkie cellist Ben Sollee, along with David Wax Museum and Cereus Bright, will perform.Ben Sollee is a native Kentuckian, having been born in Lexington, and he began playing the cello in high school. His career, much like contemporaries like Bela Fleck and Chris Thile, has been wide and varied, and Sollee’s sound is difficult to pigeonhole. Sollee draws from a vast array of influences, and you are just as likely to hear him accompanying the Charlotte Ballet or find scoring films or riding his bike – while toting his cello on a trailer – like he did on the way to perform at Bonnaroo in 2009. Sollee has been a member of both the Woodsongs Old-Time Radio Hour house band and Abigail Washburn’s Sparrow Quartet, has performed in vaunted concert halls around the world, including Carnegie Hall and the Lincoln Center, and has an impressive collection of releases to his credit.Trail Mix and the January Jams promoters are happy to give you a shot at taking in the show of Friday for free. All it takes is a simple email. Hit me up at dave@blueridgeoutdoors.com with an email and put BEN SOLLEE in the subject line. A lucky winner of two passes will be chosen from the emails received by noon on Friday.last_img read more

What Will Altice Buying Cablevision Mean for Long Island News?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York European telecommunications giant Altice’s deal to purchase Bethpage-based Cablevision Systems Corp. for $17 billion including debt raises serious questions about what the acquisition means for Cablevision’s virtual monopoly on Long Island local news.If regulators approve the sale, which is scheduled to close next year, Altice will also take over Cablevision’s media assets: Newsday, LI’s lone daily newspaper; amNew York, a free New York City daily; and seven News12 hyperlocal cable news channels covering the tristate area, including their flagship station on the Island.“We were very focused on keeping control and ownership of…the media assets, which have been loss-making historically, but are extremely attractive as far as being a part of the fiber of the local community,” Altice Chief Executive Officer Dexter Goei said on a conference call Wednesday.Altice’s deal with Cablevision, the nation’s fifth-largest cable company with 3.1 million subscribers, combined with Altice’s $6 billion acquisition earlier this year of St. Louis-based Suddenlink Communications, the seventh-largest cable provider in the country, would make it the fourth-largest cable operator.The announcement comes amid an American media consolidation frenzy this year, with Charter Communications, the nation’s third-largest cable company, purchasing Time Warner Cable, the second largest, and AT&T buying DirecTV, the satellite television company.Cablevision CEO James Dolan issued a statement early Thursday morning calling Altrice “truly worthy successors.” He also noted that the Dolan family will still own their spunoff companies, Madison Square Garden, the New York Knicks basketball team, the New York Rangers hockey team and AMC Networks, the cable channel company.“We expect that Cablevision will be in excellent hands,” Dolan said of the company that his father, Charles, founded 42 years ago. “We look forward to doing all we can to affect this transition for our customers and employees.”At one point in the negotiations, the Dolans had resisted selling their media properties as a part of the Cablevision deal, but Altice insisted on including them, The New York Times reported. Cablevision bought Newsday for $632 million seven years ago from the Tribune Company, based in Chicago.The acquisitions would not be the first foray into print media for Altice, which is owned by the French-Israeli billionaire Patrick Drahi, whom The New York Times described as “a ruthlessly efficient operator who runs a lean business.” Altice Media Group owns about 20 newspapers and magazines in France. Asked during the conference call if Altice planned to sell off Newsday, News12 and amNewYork, Goei said that is not their intention.“We find those businesses to be extremely attractive and a core part of the local community that we would like to continue to invest in and hopefully learn from in many respects,” he said. “We think that we can run those businesses a little bit more efficiently over time, but I think it’s about continuing to invest in the quality content, both on the Newsday side and as well as the News12 side.”Goei noted that Altice found the media assets’ $200 million in annual ad sales “very impressive” despite the $350 million in operating costs. He added that he believes Altice can consolidate the corporate offices of the news outlets without compromising the quality of the news coverage.“A lot of the losses are being generated by an allocation of corporate overhead,” he said. “You can expect us to try and manage those allocations a lot tighter going forward.”The Altice CEO also praised Cablevision’s controversial ownership of Newsday and said the new owner would not interfere with the newsrooms.“We have a huge amount of respect for what the Dolan family has done with those businesses,” he said. “We won’t touch anything to do with editorial content, but we obviously will look to optimize on the losses…There’s a lot of things like duplicative finance staff.”Jaci Clement, executive director of the Bethpage-based Fair Media Council, a local media watchdog group, said that while Goei may be saying all the right things now, only time will tell if Altice will tinker with the news coverage or not.“It’s too early to tell about anything,” she said. “Based on the way this has worked with other companies…you’re probably talking about a year before any changes take place…They want to formulate their own game plan and figure out what their idea of success is.”At Newsday‘s Melville office Wednesday night as news of the Cablevision sale was spreading through the building, staff in the composing room were reportedly joking about learning French.-With additional reporting by Desiree D’iorio and Spencer Rumsey.last_img read more

GRC leaders have unprecedented opportunity to become financial inclusion champions

first_imgAny time society mobilizes to advocate for positive change, people often ask, “What can I do? I’m just one person.” Credit union leaders are in an enviable position, however. Although each individual who works in the industry is, in fact, “just one person,” the movement has a way of transforming the voice of one into the power of many. Right now, we are experiencing a cultural shift – a needed reprioritization of diversity, equity and inclusion values. While there are many avenues credit unions can take to advance their own DEI impact, one important area is financial inclusion. The issue is far too complex and important to be called low hanging fruit. However, for credit unions that exist to ensure everyone has fair, dignified and affordable access to mainstream financial services, financial inclusion is perfectly aligned with their purpose. Getting board and C-suite buy-in for putting more resources behind the initiative should fit perfectly into the credit union’s mission and strategic plan. But, here’s the rub. Whereas most credit union leaders believe in the importance of financial inclusion, they often get stuck in the regulatory challenges of serving everyone in their field of membership, including underserved communities from different situations. Because so many of the laws that govern compliant financial services are, on their face, restrictive, they worry about running afoul of the rules. Our team of risk and compliance experts has heard this objection many times, and while we agree financial inclusion comes with hurdles, we also know they are not insurmountable.We’re far from the only ones to recognize that financial regulation need not stand in the way of financial inclusion. Credit union professionals who work in governance, risk and compliance (GRC) functions know it, too. That’s because understanding the applicable laws and regulations allows these professionals to properly evaluate risks and requirements and remain in compliance. GRC leaders are uniquely positioned to help credit unions overcome perceived road blocks and move their financial inclusion missions forward. They can determine if any adjustments need to be made to policies or procedures to accommodate both the regulations and any expansion to products and services to better reach underserved communities. This special group of credit union leaders is poised to make a huge difference in the lives of people and underserved communities. If you are a credit union GRC leader (or if you work for one) you have a tremendous opportunity to light a fire under your cooperative’s financial inclusion strategy. Go talk to your CEO today and let them know you are excited to mow down any of the misconceptions about regulations that may be preventing your credit union from helping people ignored (or worse, preyed on) by both mainstream and alternative providers. If you’re a CEO reading this, go take the temperature of your GRC team. If they are as passionate as you about extending your credit union’s reach into the deeper, unseen parts of your community, empower them. Give them the green light to dig into what’s stopping your deposits/savings, lending, financial education and payments teams from bringing the most vulnerable into your membership. Credit unions that have made a concerted effort to introduce more community members to the cooperative model of financial services will tell you that doing well by doing good is not only possible, it’s life changing. So to credit union GRC professionals, I urge you to join the conversation. Your voice is important to achieving richer financial inclusion. There are many helpful tools and experienced partners, including our team, available to assist credit unions with their financial inclusion mission. If there’s anything we can do to support you and your efforts, please reach out. Helping the credit union movement live out its purpose in a more inclusive manner is a high priority for our team. 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Erin O’Hern As Vice President of Strategic Initiatives, Erin O’Hern supports PolicyWorks’ market expansion through management of strategic relationships, development of market and product integration strategies and thought leadership in the governance, … Web: www.policyworksllc.com Detailslast_img read more

Maurizio Sarri explains shock decision to bench Chelsea ace Eden Hazard v Eintracht Frankfurt

first_img‘The Frankfurt dressing room has been given a big lift.’Owen Hargreaves added: ‘His whole life he’s been playing multiple games in a week. It’s a big risk. It needs to come good for Sarri.‘No way do you ever leave one of the best players in Europe out for a game like this.’Former Arsenal player Lee Dixon was also critical of the decision, saying: ‘Eden Hazard on the bench?‘If the manager came in and said he was leaving me out I’d say, I don’t care who you are, what you’ve won in the game, this is what the season is all about!‘It’s what you do all your prep for, play all those games, get to the semi-final which is arguably the most nerve-racking game. To rest him for Watford, I’m sorry, I can’t see it.’More: FootballBruno Fernandes responds to Man Utd bust-up rumours with Ole Gunnar SolskjaerNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira moves Metro Sport ReporterThursday 2 May 2019 7:29 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link598Shares Eden Hazard was named on Chelsea’s bench (Picture: Getty)Maurizio Sarri has explained his decision to bench Eden Hazard for Chelsea’s Europa League clash at Eintracht FrankfurtSpeaking to BT Sport before the match, Sarri said: ‘We have to play five matches in two weeks with the same level of importance. We need to make changes.‘This is why Eden is on the bench. He played ten matches in a row and usually he is really able to change the match from the bench.‘After ten matches in a row he needs a rest. I don’t want him to play for 90 minutes.’ADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityHazard is one of five changes made to the Chelsea team that started against Manchester United last weekend.AdvertisementAdvertisementPedro, Olivier Giroud, Ruben Loftus-Cheek, Andreas Christesen and Emerson all come in as Marcos Alonso, Mateo Kovacic and Gonzalo Higuain drop to the bench.Reacting to Sarri’s decision to bench Hazard, Glenn Hoddle said: ‘We’re sitting here scratching our heads – why would you leave him out?‘I really cant understand why you wouldn’t play your best player in the semi-final. You need your star players. For the life of me I can’t understand it.The team sheets are in! Here’s how we line up against Eintracht Frankfurt this evening. 💪#FRACHE pic.twitter.com/cjjR0Vt5er— Chelsea FC (@ChelseaFC) May 2, 2019 Advertisement Advertisement Maurizio Sarri explains shock decision to bench Chelsea ace Eden Hazard v Eintracht Frankfurt Commentlast_img read more

Ripley growth set to ramp up as developers invest in suburb

first_imgSekisui House is investing in one of Queensland’s fastest growing suburbs with their Echo Ripley residential community.About an hour’s drive from Brisbane’s CBD, one of Queensland’s fastest growing suburbs is showing no signs of slowing down soon.Sekisui House is investing in one of Queensland’s fastest growing suburbs with theirEcco Ripley residential community.Ripley, a suburb of Ipswich, was the second fastest growing in Queensland in 2016-17, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics.The ABS reported a 14.6 per cent increase in population to 5462, and an Urbis report, commissioned by developer Sekisui House, predicted the Ripley region would ramp up more, with an average population growth of 27.6 per cent a year until 2026.>>FOLLOW EMILY BLACK ON TWITTER< read more

WATCH: Happy Mum’s 1st Birthday

first_imgAn awesome Pampers AdA baby’s first birthday is also a mum’s first birthday. This movie is dedicated to all mums who have faced the most trying year of their life. Women who have faced their first year as mothers along with their babies. A year filled with joys and uncertainties. Thank you, for the most trying year of your lives. MUM’S 1ST BIRTHDAY. Happy 1st birthday mum.last_img

What Is Going On in US Gymnastics?

first_imgIt was very disturbing to hear about the allegations leveled against the former doctor involved with our Olympic Gymnastics program.  Both of the women involved with these allegations are calling for a complete overhaul from the Olympic Gymnastics Board.  According to their lawsuit, they were allegedly sexually abused by this Olympic doctor.  Since they brought this to the attention of the authorities, many of their colleagues have voiced the same allegations.It is sad to hear that you can’t trust those who are put in the position of authority.  Most of these young ladies are in their early teens, and as a parent, you believe that someone such as a medical doctor would have the ethics associated with such a profession.  How do people get a position like this if these allegations are true?last_img read more

Defeat drops UW to No.11

first_imgSalow provides sparkoff the benchFor junior Morgan Salow, playing time has been hard to comeby so far this season, as she has only appeared in 33 of Wisconsin’s 85 games thisyear. However, in Saturdaynight’s win against the Wildcats, Salow came off the bench and provided a sparkfor the Badgers over the finally three games. “[Salow has] been the kind who, both on the left side andthe right, has been ready to go the whole year,” Waite said. One of the reasons Waite said he brought Salow into thethird game was to provide a different kind of block on the right side.“Sometimes Kat (Dykstra) can put up such a big block thatit’s actually a detriment because it’s such a target for the hitters. And ifshe’s not really on, then it really goes off for her and we can’t even defendwhen it goes out of bounds like that. Morgan’s good size, but not the same kindof block, but [she] just kept the ball in play.”For the night, Salow had six kills and chipped in with twoblocks.“(Salow) scored at some critical times. (She) had a tip — anoff-speed kill — late in the match that really made a difference for us. It wasgreat for her. It’s going to be a great confidence for her, too.” Wisconsin wins 20againFor the ninth straight year under Waite, Wisconsin has won20 matches in a season with its win over Northwestern Saturday night.“Our goals are to play great every time,” Waite said. “It’snot always the wins because if we play great, the wins will come. And that’swhat we have to do is get the passion for the players on the court, having agreat time, playing high quality ball, and they’re going to get their wins.”During Waite’s nine-year career at Wisconsin, he has acareer record off 224-63. The fewest number of wins one of his Badger teams haswon in a season was 22, which has happened twice (2003 and 2004). Thehigh-water mark for wins under Waite is 34, which occurred during the 2000season when his team won the Big Ten title and reached the NCAA championshipmatch. JEFF SCHORFHEIDE/Herald photoAfter being upset by Michigan State Friday night, theUniversity of Wisconsin volleyball team dropped four spots to No. 11 in thelatest rankings and is now two games behind Big Ten conference leader PennState.“On Friday, it kind of took me by surprise a little bit,”head coach Pete Waite said during his Monday press conference. “Michigan Stateis a very good team, and I had said that they’re really a hot team and theyplayed maybe the best they have all season, but we were a little off. They wereout of sync for some reason.”While Waite gave credit to Michigan State’s defense forholding Wisconsin to .222 hitting percentage in the match, he cited some of hisplayers being banged up as a reason for the poor showing Friday night.“I think part of that is we’ve been a little banged up,”Waite said. “Practices during the week haven’t been able to be as highintensity all the time as we’d like because you’ve got to be careful to keeppeople on the floor. That might have had a little bit to do with it, and that’sjust kind of my decision as far as how much you can push at any given point.”While Wisconsin was able to bounce back with a win overNorthwestern Saturday night, the squad still didn’t play up to its fullpotential, including senior setter Jackie Simpson who was benched in the middleof the second game. “I thought in general, the team was a little bit flustered,”Waite said. “[Simpson] was getting a little flustered and frustrated trying tocreate things and force things a little too much.”However, Waite credited Simpson’s time on the bench asreason for her improvement over the final three games of the match“Sometimes when you take a player out, they sit on the benchand they actually see what their coaches and the fans see,” Waite said. “Ithink Jackie got back in there and did a better job.”Now after a not-so-stellar weekend for the Badgers, Waite isexpecting his team to come out this week and play at its normal high level.“It was a bit of surprise,” Waite said of his team’s playover the weekend. “That’s not typical of our team, and I think they’re going tobe real motivated this week to correct things.”last_img read more

2019 center Jesse Edwards commits to Syracuse

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on April 5, 2019 at 1:48 pm Contact Anthony: amdabbun@syr.edu Jesse Edwards became the fifth player to join Syracuse’s 2019 recruiting class Friday.Edwards is a 6-foot-11, 205-pound, center currently enrolled in IMG Academy in Florida, a team he joined in January from the Netherlands. Edwards chose the Orange over four other Division I schools, including Georgia Tech, Providence, Stanford and Creighton. Assistant head coach Allen Griffin was the lead recruiter for Edwards, who visited campus on Monday, April 1 before making his decision.He joins Joe Girard III, Brycen Goodine, Quincy Guerrier, and fellow center John Bol Ajak in the committed freshmen class for next season. The Orange will have to replace graduating senior center Paschal Chukwu in next year’s rotation. Bourama Sidibe and Marek Dolezaj will return to SU for their junior seasons. Comments AdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more