La Verna Hospital taking part in World Aids DayLa Verna Hospital taking

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Stop Facebook videos chowing your data

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National Book Week comes to LadysmithNational Book Week comes to Ladysmith

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Jacó Happenings

first_imgNo related posts. Paul and Cassidy Barbeau have relocated their Pura Vida Pantry to a large, outdoor setting in Herradura, with tropical garden seating for 16. The same inventive and healthy meals are offered daily, as well as raw, vegan and gluten-free snacks (also available for takeaway).Cassidy Barbeau can prepare weekly meal plans for specialty diets. She offers private cooking lessons, and Paul Barbeau is growing some of the finest wheatgrass around. Juice cleanses and wellness detoxes are available through the pantry as well. Call 8733-4811 for more info, or email puravidapantry@gmail.com.Glen Bain from Costa Rica Pools has taken the lead on beach cleanups in Jacó. Together with John Walker and The Central Pacific Chamber of Commerce, Glen has been instrumental in motivating locals, tourists and business owners to take pride in keeping Jacó clean. More than 30 people have volunteered in what will now be a monthly event, every third Monday of the month. If you or your business would like to be involved, contact Glen at costaricapools@hotmail.com or the chamber at cenpac.chamber@gmail.com. The chamber will be having its annual public meeting June 26 at 7 p.m. in Balcón del Mar.–Christina Truittchristina_truitt@yahoo.com Facebook Commentslast_img read more

PHOTO STORY Costa Ricas Slut Walk 20

first_imgAccessibility Without Exclusion Party (PASE) presidential candidate Óscar López recentlysaid in a radio interview that there was a “thin line between consent and rape.”Those statements prompted outrage across the country, and the response was Slut Walk 2.0. Protesters last Friday night rallied to denounce López’s comments, as well as to speak out against Costa Rica’s ban on abortion, the Catholic Church’s position on social issues and violence against women, among other issues.The march began at 8 p.m. in Parque Central, in downtown San José, and then headed east on Avenida 4, past the National Theater, and then west on Central Avenue to Parque Central. Here are some photo highlights. Share your reactions with other Tico Times readers on our Facebook here. No related posts. Facebook Commentslast_img read more

Tico musician Tapado Vargas debuts song video cowritten with pop superstar Alanis

first_imgRelated posts:Neil Young vows Starbucks boycott over GMOs San José’s newest coffee shop – on wheels Lana Del Rey evokes classic singers in dark ‘Honeymoon’ Rolling Stones to tour Latin America Facebook Comments Pop icon Alanis Morissette teamed up with Costa Rican percussionist and Latin Grammy winner Carlos ‘Tapado” Vargas to release over the weekend the song “The Morning,” along with an accompanying video recorded for the upcoming documentary “A Small Section of the World,” scheduled to premiere at DOC NYC Festival on Nov. 14 before its release in theaters in December.The documentary tells the story of a group of Costa Rican women from Biolley (ASOMOBI), a rural area in the southern Pacific canton of Buenos Aires, whose ideas sparked a revolution in the coffee growing world.“After a crisis, the men of the village left in search of work and the women came together to imagine a different future for themselves, their families and their community by building their own coffee mill. They are the first women’s run micro-mill in their country,” the documentary’s official website states.See the trailer for “A Small Section of the World”:center_img Vargas, a member of the renowned Costa Rican bands Editus and Malpaís, co-wrote the song for the documentary and recorded with 16 Costa Rican musicians, including Editus’ Edín Solís. He used coffee beans and other tools used in coffee processing to create percussive elements for the track.The song was commissioned by Italian coffee giant Illy and is now available for purchase on iTunes.“By downloading ‘The Morning,’ you are helping to enrich the lives of women looking to educate and empower themselves in the world of coffee,” a message posted on the documentary’s website states. “Proceeds from every song purchase are matched by the Ernesto Illy Foundation and then go directly towards providing scholarships for women around the world to earn a master’s degree in coffee and economic sciences and expanding the programs available to women,” the message adds.“I just basically live for the feminine being and beauty — really talking about it and extolling the virtues of the feminine being celebrated in men and women alike,” Morissette told entertainment magazine The Hollywood Reporter, referring to the collaboration.Directed by Lesley Chilcott, producer of renowned documentaries such as “Waiting for Superman,” and “An Inconvenient Truth,” “A Small Section of the World” will open in U.S. theaters on Dec. 5.Recommended: Teaching pride in rural livingWatch a video clip for Alanis Morissette’s “The Morning,” featuring Costa Rican percussionist Tapado Vargas:last_img read more

Despite doubling of staff Costa Ricas judicial branch resolves far fewer cases

first_imgThe number of cases resolved by Costa Rican courts has declined precipitously over the past 13 years despite a doubling of judicial staff over the same time period, according to a new report from Costa Rica’sState of the Nation Program.The “State of Justice” report also found that resolution of legal complaints is increasingly expensive for the country, in part becuase of the justice system’s large number of employees.Per capita, the judicial branch has doubled its staff since 2000, from 120 employees for every 100,000 citizens to 238 employees for every 100,000 in 2013. This increase, however, did not translate into greater efficiency in terms of the number of cases prosecuted, the report found.In fact, the justice system may be much less efficient now than it was at the start of the millenium.In 2000, a total of 841 cases were resolved by a single court, meaning they ended without any appeals to higher courts. But that number dropped to 486 by 2013, according to the report.Costa Rican judges issued an average of 958 sentences in 2000, but by 2012 that figure was just 143.Also, the justice system began promoting alternative dispute resolution in 2000, but these mechanisms were only used in 1.3 percent of cases evaluated in the report.The report was the first time the State of the Nation Program has evaluated the country’s justice system. The program is a collaboration between Costa Rica’s public universities and the government ombudsman’s office.Supreme Court President Zarela Villanueva said justices acknowledge the “weakness in efficiency” highlighted by the report. But she said the increase in staff is justified by the growth of services offered, as well as new departments and facilities created in recent years to provide citizens with more effective service.The report also highlighted the large number of legal complaints that never make it to court. That can be a good sign, State of Justice coordinator Evelyn Villareal explained.In 2013 judicial offices received nearly 600,000 complaints, of which 65 percent were dismissed or archived, meaning they did not end in a trial or final ruling. In one of every three cases, a judge dismissed a complaint for lack of merit.Of all criminal complaints filed in 2013, 32 percent were archived by the prosecution, meaning they couldn’t attribute a crime to any suspect. Another one-third of complaints were rejected because of weak evidence.Only 15 percent of criminal complaints ended in a sentence, of which 8.7 percent resulted in conviction while the remaining 6.5 percent resulted in acquittal.Villareal conceeded that the report didn’t reflect the full reality of Costa Rica’s justice system. (But) “it is a starting point for research in areas not previously investigated in the country,” she said.The study is available on State of the Nation’s website (in Spanish). Facebook Comments Related posts:Legislative hearing on Supreme Court justice facing rape charges delayed until next week Supreme Court re-elects Jorge Chavarría as Costa Rica’s chief prosecutor despite protests No prison sentences for petty theft, lawmakers propose Costa Ricans report increasing safety concerns; 2016 is set to become most violent year on recordlast_img read more

Happy Childrens Day

first_imgStudents from the Franklin Roosevelt school in San Pedro, Montes de Oca, celebrate Children’s Day with carnival rides in the plaza in front of the school, east of San José. Facebook Comments No related posts.last_img